Running A Full Node - Bitcoin

Groestlcoin 6th Anniversary Release

Introduction

Dear Groestlers, it goes without saying that 2020 has been a difficult time for millions of people worldwide. The groestlcoin team would like to take this opportunity to wish everyone our best to everyone coping with the direct and indirect effects of COVID-19. Let it bring out the best in us all and show that collectively, we can conquer anything.
The centralised banks and our national governments are facing unprecedented times with interest rates worldwide dropping to record lows in places. Rest assured that this can only strengthen the fundamentals of all decentralised cryptocurrencies and the vision that was seeded with Satoshi's Bitcoin whitepaper over 10 years ago. Despite everything that has been thrown at us this year, the show must go on and the team will still progress and advance to continue the momentum that we have developed over the past 6 years.
In addition to this, we'd like to remind you all that this is Groestlcoin's 6th Birthday release! In terms of price there have been some crazy highs and lows over the years (with highs of around $2.60 and lows of $0.000077!), but in terms of value– Groestlcoin just keeps getting more valuable! In these uncertain times, one thing remains clear – Groestlcoin will keep going and keep innovating regardless. On with what has been worked on and completed over the past few months.

UPDATED - Groestlcoin Core 2.18.2

This is a major release of Groestlcoin Core with many protocol level improvements and code optimizations, featuring the technical equivalent of Bitcoin v0.18.2 but with Groestlcoin-specific patches. On a general level, most of what is new is a new 'Groestlcoin-wallet' tool which is now distributed alongside Groestlcoin Core's other executables.
NOTE: The 'Account' API has been removed from this version which was typically used in some tip bots. Please ensure you check the release notes from 2.17.2 for details on replacing this functionality.

How to Upgrade?

Windows
If you are running an older version, shut it down. Wait until it has completely shut down (which might take a few minutes for older versions), then run the installer.
OSX
If you are running an older version, shut it down. Wait until it has completely shut down (which might take a few minutes for older versions), run the dmg and drag Groestlcoin Core to Applications.
Ubuntu
http://groestlcoin.org/forum/index.php?topic=441.0

Other Linux

http://groestlcoin.org/forum/index.php?topic=97.0

Download

Download the Windows Installer (64 bit) here
Download the Windows Installer (32 bit) here
Download the Windows binaries (64 bit) here
Download the Windows binaries (32 bit) here
Download the OSX Installer here
Download the OSX binaries here
Download the Linux binaries (64 bit) here
Download the Linux binaries (32 bit) here
Download the ARM Linux binaries (64 bit) here
Download the ARM Linux binaries (32 bit) here

Source

ALL NEW - Groestlcoin Moonshine iOS/Android Wallet

Built with React Native, Moonshine utilizes Electrum-GRS's JSON-RPC methods to interact with the Groestlcoin network.
GRS Moonshine's intended use is as a hot wallet. Meaning, your keys are only as safe as the device you install this wallet on. As with any hot wallet, please ensure that you keep only a small, responsible amount of Groestlcoin on it at any given time.

Features

Download

iOS
Android

Source

ALL NEW! – HODL GRS Android Wallet

HODL GRS connects directly to the Groestlcoin network using SPV mode and doesn't rely on servers that can be hacked or disabled.
HODL GRS utilizes AES hardware encryption, app sandboxing, and the latest security features to protect users from malware, browser security holes, and even physical theft. Private keys are stored only in the secure enclave of the user's phone, inaccessible to anyone other than the user.
Simplicity and ease-of-use is the core design principle of HODL GRS. A simple recovery phrase (which we call a Backup Recovery Key) is all that is needed to restore the user's wallet if they ever lose or replace their device. HODL GRS is deterministic, which means the user's balance and transaction history can be recovered just from the backup recovery key.

Features

Download

Main Release (Main Net)
Testnet Release

Source

ALL NEW! – GroestlcoinSeed Savior

Groestlcoin Seed Savior is a tool for recovering BIP39 seed phrases.
This tool is meant to help users with recovering a slightly incorrect Groestlcoin mnemonic phrase (AKA backup or seed). You can enter an existing BIP39 mnemonic and get derived addresses in various formats.
To find out if one of the suggested addresses is the right one, you can click on the suggested address to check the address' transaction history on a block explorer.

Features

Live Version (Not Recommended)

https://www.groestlcoin.org/recovery/

Download

https://github.com/Groestlcoin/mnemonic-recovery/archive/master.zip

Source

ALL NEW! – Vanity Search Vanity Address Generator

NOTE: NVidia GPU or any CPU only. AMD graphics cards will not work with this address generator.
VanitySearch is a command-line Segwit-capable vanity Groestlcoin address generator. Add unique flair when you tell people to send Groestlcoin. Alternatively, VanitySearch can be used to generate random addresses offline.
If you're tired of the random, cryptic addresses generated by regular groestlcoin clients, then VanitySearch is the right choice for you to create a more personalized address.
VanitySearch is a groestlcoin address prefix finder. If you want to generate safe private keys, use the -s option to enter your passphrase which will be used for generating a base key as for BIP38 standard (VanitySearch.exe -s "My PassPhrase" FXPref). You can also use VanitySearch.exe -ps "My PassPhrase" which will add a crypto secure seed to your passphrase.
VanitySearch may not compute a good grid size for your GPU, so try different values using -g option in order to get the best performances. If you want to use GPUs and CPUs together, you may have best performances by keeping one CPU core for handling GPU(s)/CPU exchanges (use -t option to set the number of CPU threads).

Features

Usage

https://github.com/Groestlcoin/VanitySearch#usage

Download

Source

ALL NEW! – Groestlcoin EasyVanity 2020

Groestlcoin EasyVanity 2020 is a windows app built from the ground-up and makes it easier than ever before to create your very own bespoke bech32 address(es) when whilst not connected to the internet.
If you're tired of the random, cryptic bech32 addresses generated by regular Groestlcoin clients, then Groestlcoin EasyVanity2020 is the right choice for you to create a more personalised bech32 address. This 2020 version uses the new VanitySearch to generate not only legacy addresses (F prefix) but also Bech32 addresses (grs1 prefix).

Features

Download

Source

Remastered! – Groestlcoin WPF Desktop Wallet (v2.19.0.18)

Groestlcoin WPF is an alternative full node client with optional lightweight 'thin-client' mode based on WPF. Windows Presentation Foundation (WPF) is one of Microsoft's latest approaches to a GUI framework, used with the .NET framework. Its main advantages over the original Groestlcoin client include support for exporting blockchain.dat and including a lite wallet mode.
This wallet was previously deprecated but has been brought back to life with modern standards.

Features

Remastered Improvements

Download

Source

ALL NEW! – BIP39 Key Tool

Groestlcoin BIP39 Key Tool is a GUI interface for generating Groestlcoin public and private keys. It is a standalone tool which can be used offline.

Features

Download

Windows
Linux :
 pip3 install -r requirements.txt python3 bip39\_gui.py 

Source

ALL NEW! – Electrum Personal Server

Groestlcoin Electrum Personal Server aims to make using Electrum Groestlcoin wallet more secure and more private. It makes it easy to connect your Electrum-GRS wallet to your own full node.
It is an implementation of the Electrum-grs server protocol which fulfils the specific need of using the Electrum-grs wallet backed by a full node, but without the heavyweight server backend, for a single user. It allows the user to benefit from all Groestlcoin Core's resource-saving features like pruning, blocks only and disabled txindex. All Electrum-GRS's feature-richness like hardware wallet integration, multi-signature wallets, offline signing, seed recovery phrases, coin control and so on can still be used, but connected only to the user's own full node.
Full node wallets are important in Groestlcoin because they are a big part of what makes the system be trust-less. No longer do people have to trust a financial institution like a bank or PayPal, they can run software on their own computers. If Groestlcoin is digital gold, then a full node wallet is your own personal goldsmith who checks for you that received payments are genuine.
Full node wallets are also important for privacy. Using Electrum-GRS under default configuration requires it to send (hashes of) all your Groestlcoin addresses to some server. That server can then easily spy on your transactions. Full node wallets like Groestlcoin Electrum Personal Server would download the entire blockchain and scan it for the user's own addresses, and therefore don't reveal to anyone else which Groestlcoin addresses they are interested in.
Groestlcoin Electrum Personal Server can also broadcast transactions through Tor which improves privacy by resisting traffic analysis for broadcasted transactions which can link the IP address of the user to the transaction. If enabled this would happen transparently whenever the user simply clicks "Send" on a transaction in Electrum-grs wallet.
Note: Currently Groestlcoin Electrum Personal Server can only accept one connection at a time.

Features

Download

Windows
Linux / OSX (Instructions)

Source

UPDATED – Android Wallet 7.38.1 - Main Net + Test Net

The app allows you to send and receive Groestlcoin on your device using QR codes and URI links.
When using this app, please back up your wallet and email them to yourself! This will save your wallet in a password protected file. Then your coins can be retrieved even if you lose your phone.

Changes

Download

Main Net
Main Net (FDroid)
Test Net

Source

UPDATED – Groestlcoin Sentinel 3.5.06 (Android)

Groestlcoin Sentinel is a great solution for anyone who wants the convenience and utility of a hot wallet for receiving payments directly into their cold storage (or hardware wallets).
Sentinel accepts XPUB's, YPUB'S, ZPUB's and individual Groestlcoin address. Once added you will be able to view balances, view transactions, and (in the case of XPUB's, YPUB's and ZPUB's) deterministically generate addresses for that wallet.
Groestlcoin Sentinel is a fork of Groestlcoin Samourai Wallet with all spending and transaction building code removed.

Changes

Download

Source

UPDATED – P2Pool Test Net

Changes

Download

Pre-Hosted Testnet P2Pool is available via http://testp2pool.groestlcoin.org:21330/static/

Source

submitted by Yokomoko_Saleen to groestlcoin [link] [comments]

Interested in contributing to the BTC network? Here is the steps to get a full node up and running in Linux.

These instructions will work both on a VPS cloud server or a personal computer. You may find cheap VPS somewhere online for rent.
What Is A Full Node?
A full node is a program that fully validates transactions and blocks. Almost all full nodes also help the network by accepting transactions and blocks from other full nodes, validating those transactions and blocks, and then relaying them to further full nodes.
Most full nodes also serve lightweight clients by allowing them to transmit their transactions to the network and by notifying them when a transaction affects their wallet. If not enough nodes perform this function, clients won’t be able to connect through the peer-to-peer network—they’ll have to use centralized services instead.
Many people and organizations volunteer to run full nodes using spare computing and bandwidth resources—but more volunteers are needed to allow Bitcoin to continue to grow. This document describes how you can help and what helping will cost you.
Costs And Warnings
Running a Bitcoin full node comes with certain costs and can expose you to certain risks. This section will explain those costs and risks so you can decide whether you’re able to help the network.
Special Cases
Miners, businesses, and privacy-conscious users rely on particular behavior from the full nodes they use, so they will often run their own full nodes and take special safety precautions. This document does not cover those precautions—it only describes running a full node to help support the Bitcoin network in general.
Please consult an expert if you need help setting up your full node correctly to handle high-value and privacy-sensitive tasks.
Secure Your Wallet
It’s possible and safe to run a full node to support the network and use its wallet to store your bitcoins, but you must take the same precautions you would when using any Bitcoin wallet. Please see the securing your wallet page for more information.
Minimum Requirements
Bitcoin Core full nodes have certain requirements. If you try running a node on weak hardware, it may work—but you’ll likely spend more time dealing with issues. If you can meet the following requirements, you’ll have an easy-to-use node.
Note: many operating systems today (Windows, Mac, and Linux) enter a low-power mode after the screensaver activates, slowing or halting network traffic. This is often the default setting on laptops and on all Mac OS X laptops and desktops. Check your screensaver settings and disable automatic “sleep” or “suspend” options to ensure you support the network whenever your computer is running.
Possible Problems
Legal: Bitcoin use is prohibited or restricted in some areas.
Bandwidth limits: Some Internet plans will charge an additional amount for any excess upload bandwidth used that isn’t included in the plan. Worse, some providers may terminate your connection without warning because of overuse. We advise that you check whether your Internet connection is subjected to such limitations and monitor your bandwidth use so that you can stop Bitcoin Core before you reach your upload limit.
Anti-virus: Several people have placed parts of known computer viruses in the Bitcoin block chain. This block chain data can’t infect your computer, but some anti-virus programs quarantine the data anyway, making it more difficult to run a full node. This problem mostly affects computers running Windows.
Attack target: People who want to disrupt the Bitcoin network may attack full nodes in ways that will affect other things you do with your computer, such as an attack that limits your available download bandwidth or an attack that prevents you from using your full node’s wallet for sending transactions.
Linux Instructions
The following instructions describe installing Bitcoin Core on Linux systems.
Ubuntu 14.10 Instructions for Bitcoin Core 0.10.0.
If you use Ubuntu Desktop, click the Ubuntu swirl icon to start the Dash and type “term” into the input box. Choose any one of the terminals listed:
Alternatively, access a console or terminal emulator using another method, such as SSH on Ubuntu Server or a terminal launcher in an alternative desktop environment.
Type the following line to add the Bitcoin Personal Package Archive (PPA) to your system:
sudo apt-add-repository ppa:bitcoin/bitcoin
You will be prompted for your user password. Provide it to continue. Afterwards, the following text will be displayed:
Stable Channel of bitcoin-qt and bitcoind for Ubuntu, and their dependencies
More info: https://launchpad.net/~bitcoin/+archive/ubuntu/bitcoin
Press [ENTER] to continue or ctrl-c to cancel adding it
Press enter to continue. The following text (with some variations) will be displayed and you will be returned to the command line prompt:
gpg: keyring /tmp/tmpixuqu73x/secring.gpg' created gpg: keyring/tmp/tmpixuqu73x/pubring.gpg' created gpg: requesting key 8842CE5E from hkp server > > > >keyserver.ubuntu.com gpg: /tmp/tmpixuqu73x/trustdb.gpg: trustdb created gpg: key 8842CE5E: public key "Launchpad PPA for Bitcoin" imported gpg: no ultimately trusted keys found gpg: Total number processed: 1 pg: imported: 1 (RSA: 1) OK
Type the following line to get the most recent list of packages:
sudo apt-get update
A large number of lines will be displayed as different update files are downloaded. This step may take several minutes on a slow Internet connection.
To continue, choose one of the following options
sudo apt-get install bitcoin-qt
sudo apt-get install bitcoind
sudo apt-get install bitcoin-qt bitcoind
After choosing what packages to install, you will be asked whether you want to proceed. Press enter to continue.
If you’re logged in as an administrative user with sudo access, you may log out. The steps in this section should be performed as the user you want to run Bitcoin Core. (If you’re an expert administrator, you can make this a locked account used only by Bitcoin Core.)
Before using the Bitcoin Core daemon, bitcoind, you need to create its configuration file with a user name and password. First create the .bitcoin directory, create (touch) the file, and set the file’s permissions so that only your user account can read it. From the terminal, type:
mkdir ~/.bitcoin touch ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf chmod 600 ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf
Then you can run the command bitcoind. It will print output similar to this:
bitcoind Error: To use the "-server" option, you must set a rpcpassword in the configuration file: /home/bitcoinorg/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf It is recommended you use the following random password: rpcuser=bitcoinrpc rpcpassword=XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX (you do not need to remember this password)
The username and password MUST NOT be the same.
If the file does not exist, create it with owner-readable-only file permissions. It is also recommended to set alertnotify so you are notified of problems; for example: alertnotify=echo %s | mail -s "Bitcoin Alert" [email protected] The “rpcpassword” displayed will be unique for your system. You can copy the rpcuser and rpcpassword lines into your configuration file using the following commands. Note that in most Ubuntu terminals, you need to press Ctrl-Shift-C to copy and Ctrl-Shift-V to paste because Ctrl-C and Ctrl-V have different meanings in a Unix-style terminal.
echo rpcuser=bitcoinrpc >> ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf echo rpcpassword=XXXXXX >> ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf (Warning: Don’t use XXXXXX as your RPC password. Copy the rpcpassword displayed by bitcoind for your system.)
Now you can start Bitcoin Core daemon for real. Type the following command:
bitcoind -daemon
It will print a message that Bitcoin Core is starting. To interact with Bitcoin Core daemon, you will use the command bitcoin-cli (Bitcoin command line interface). Note: it may take up to several minutes for Bitcoin Core to start, during which it will display the following message whenever you use bitcoin-cli:
error: {"code":-28,"message":"Verifying blocks..."}
After it starts, you may find the following commands useful for basic interaction with your node:
to safely stop your node, run the following command:
bitcoin-cli stop
A complete list of commands is available in the Bitcoin.org developer reference.
When Bitcoin Core daemon first starts, it will begin to download the block chain. This step will take at least several hours, and it may take a day or more on a slow Internet connection or with a slow computer. During the download, Bitcoin Core will use a significant part of your connection bandwidth. You can stop Bitcoin Core at any time using the stop command; it will resume from the point where it stopped the next time you start it.
Optional: Start Your Node At Boot
Starting your node automatically each time your computer boots makes it easy for you to contribute to the network. The easiest way to do this is to start Bitcoin Core daemon from your crontab. To edit your crontab, run the following command:
crontab -e
@reboot bitcoind -daemon Save the file and exit; the updated crontab file will be installed for you. Now Bitcoin Core daemon will be automatically started each time your reboot your computer.
If you’re an Ubuntu expert and want to use an init script instead, see this Upstart script.
You have now completed installing Bitcoin Core. If you have any questions, please ask in one of Bitcoin’s many communities, such as Bitcoin StackExchange, BitcoinTalk technical support, or the #bitcoin IRC chatroom on Freenode.
To support the Bitcoin network, you also need to allow incoming connections. Please read the Network Configuration section for details.
Network Configuration
If you want to support the Bitcoin network, you must allow inbound connections.
When Bitcoin Core starts, it establishes 8 outbound connections to other full nodes so it can download the latest blocks and transactions. If you just want to use your full node as a wallet, you don’t need more than these 8 connections—but if you want to support lightweight clients and other full nodes on the network, you must allow inbound connections.
Servers connected directly to the Internet usually don’t require any special configuration. You can use the testing instructions below to confirm your server-based node accepts inbound connections.
Home connections are usually filtered by a router or modem. Bitcoin Core will request your router automatically configure itself to allow inbound connections to Bitcoin’s port, port 8333. Unfortunately many routers don’t allow automatic configuration, so you must manually configure your router. You may also need to configure your firewall to allow inbound connections to port 8333. Please see the following subsections for details.
Testing Connections
The BitNodes project provides an online tool to let you test whether your node accepts inbound connections. To use it, start Bitcoin Core (either the GUI or the daemon), wait 10 minutes, and then visit the GetAddr page (https://getaddr.bitnodes.io/). The tool will attempt to guess your IP address—if the address is wrong (or blank), you will need to enter your address manually.
For more instruction and reviews based off BTC please follow my subreddit /BTC_Reviews
all material from this post was found here --> https://bitcoin.org/en/full-node
submitted by Mattjhagen to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

DECENT MINING SETUP & RESSOURCES SHORTCUT

To all DECENTants,
I would like to encourage you to become a seeder or witness (actually not miner) on DECENT.

SHORT INTRODUCTION ABOUT ME

As a pioneer with Bitcoin I truly believed in the DCT project and it's proposal. The first day of the ICO release I sent all my BTC balance to the DECENT. Not knowing when and what they will deliver. To participate in this great adventure means a lot to me. Another project from my home country I strongly encourage you to get familiar with is Ethereum. I have been an early CPU miner: before Crypto Currency I used to compute for sience projects grid for Clean Water and Cancer Research. If I hadn't bought Rainforest with the Ripple they distributed to all contributors, I'd be a rich man today. :P

DECENT SUPPORT

https://decent.ladesk.com/

DECENT WIKI

https://wiki.decent.ch/doku.php?id=decent:howto#build_decent_from_source

DECENT GITHUB

https://github.com/DECENTfoundation/DECENT-Network

BLOCK EXPLORER

https://explorer.decent.ch/

DECENT DB

https://decent-db.com/

GRAPHENE CLI Wallet Cookbook

https://github.com/bitshares/bitshares-core/wiki/CLI-Wallet-Cookbook

RESSOURCES

https://www.digitalocean.com/community/tutorials/initial-server-setup-with-ubuntu-16-04
http://www.hamvocke.com/blog/a-quick-and-easy-guide-to-tmux/
https://digitizor.com/create-swap-file-ubuntu-linux/

I - SERVER SETUP

A dedicated server with Linux Ubuntu 16.04 LTS is most recommend for 24/7 operation. I suggest you close the root and create a new user with SSH Key, secure the system with a firewall.

1. Create a new user

adduser bob 

2. Elevate him

usermod -aG sudo bob 

3. Generate a new keyset

ssh-keygen 

4- Bind the new keys

ssh-copy-id [email protected]_server_ip 
Copy the keys to your local drive. You'll need them to connect.

5. Change the config file

sudo nano /etc/ssh/sshd_config 
Change Line PasswordAuthentication no

6. Finish with

sudo systemctl reload sshd 

7. Login with your ssh key, user and password

ssh [email protected]_server_ip 

II - PREREQUISITES

1. Grab your tools

sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install build-essential autotools-dev automake autoconf libtool make cmake checkinstall realpath gcc g++ flex bison doxygen gettext git qt5-default libqt5svg5-dev libreadline-dev libcrypto++-dev libgmp-dev libdb-dev libdb++-dev libssl-dev libncurses5-dev libboost-all-dev libcurl4-openssl-dev python-dev libicu-dev libbz2-dev 

2. Download and build Boost 1.60.0

mkdir -p ~/dev/DECENTfoundation/DECENT-Network-third-party cd ~/dev/DECENTfoundation/DECENT-Network-third-party rm -rf boost_1_60_0* boost-1.60.0* wget https://sourceforge.net/projects/boost/files/boost/1.60.0/boost_1_60_0.tar.gz tar xvf boost_1_60_0.tar.gz mkdir boost-1.60.0_prefix cd boost_1_60_0 export BOOST_ROOT=$(realpath ../boost-1.60.0_prefix) ./bootstrap.sh --prefix=$BOOST_ROOT ./b2 install cd .. rm -rf boost_1_60_0 boost_1_60_0.tar.gz 

III - INSTALLATION

1. Clone the repo

mkdir -p ~/dev/DECENTfoundation cd ~/dev/DECENTfoundation #via ssh $ git clone [email protected]:DECENTfoundation/DECENT-Network.git #via url $ git clone https://github.com/DECENTfoundation/DECENT-Network.git cd DECENT-Network git submodule update --init --recursive 

2. Build and install Decent

mkdir -p ~/dev/DECENTfoundation/DECENT-Network-build cd ~/dev/DECENTfoundation/DECENT-Network-build cmake -G "Unix Makefiles" -D CMAKE_BUILD_TYPE=Debug ~/dev/DECENTfoundation/DECENT-Network cmake --build . --target all -- -j -l 3.0 cmake --build . --target install 

IV - USE DECENT

You don't want your server to shut down the process when you lose connection or quit.
I use tmux. Though nohup is sufficient for infrequent access. Use it when you fire up decentd after miner setup.
nohup ./decentd & disown 

1. RUN decentd - On first run decentd will create .decent in the home directory.

~/dev/DECENTfoundation/DECENT-Network-build/artifacts/prefix/bin/decentd 
Always close it via Ctrl+C to save the current state Ctrl+S Freeze Ctrl+Q Resume

2. Get HELP

cd ~/dev/DECENTfoundation/DECENT-Network-build/artifacts/prefix/bin/ ./decentd -h 

3. RUN cli_wallet

~/dev/DECENTfoundation/DECENT-Network-build/artifacts/prefix/bin/cli_wallet 
Close it with Ctrl+D

4. USE cli_wallet

set_password xy unlock xy 

5. IMPORT your account

import_key decentgo_username your_private_key 

6. CREATE 3 sets of keys for your new account

suggest_brain_key 
write them down, don't use the ones below. ;)

1. new owner key

{ "brain_priv_key1": "UNBUSH ROAR CHKALIK STRUE PLATTEN DEMOB COLETIT DECAYER SPERONE SPASMED ANATASE LAGGARD BESPETE AXOID SERAL CHEKI", "wif_priv_key1": "5J4brX9bydADigEtsXZhCZ1YLVXkq8frp4xcKAREQ3Gh3P2DE7e", "pub_key1": "DCT5VNJni7HypYi159qiwazZ1WZUt4p2v7NLQmFCJPDvjBpW2oG8a" } 

2. new active key

{ "brain_priv_key2": "FUSION BLART JAIL FESTAL LAXNESS ROSTEL TITI VANADYL PUG BATATA KAIK ROSETY STUCCO TETE BEMUDDY WUDGE", "wif_priv_key2": "5HvsjRsokHSeeUdRkM88JgLzYJ6vnc2e35CzyZNRnmh1fvm91Jz", "pub_key2": "DCT7G7KeUnMPVKXN2y8M7BnyosLRE3LtSnNp7kbxtYd9xHiBoX6wd" } 

3. new public signing key

{ "brain_priv_key3": "DECESS LABBA PLAN DEHUSK FISTY MOSSER SPURTER SCORIAE INDART UNDYE MASTER STEIGH SAFROLE FLURR THAPSIA JOB", "wif_priv_key3": "5JgMsecySgt2BQsmmEE9QnwAGuudC9fGeZJhreyPatcu2TVY9bs", "pub_key3": "DCT6D7TLeVJmPQWR73XHvEhTVHzTDoG6oTSUyvfGa58nuc5wL96UH" } 

7. CREATE your new account

register_account new_username pub_key1 pub_key2 decentgo_username true 

8. SEND some DCT to your new account

transfer decentgo_username target_username 3.00 DCT "memo" true 

9. IMPORT the new account

import_key new_username wif_priv_key2 

10. Close the Wallet and edit the config.ini inside /root/.decent/data/decentd/

private-key = ["pub_key2","wif_priv_key2"] 

11. Launch again and create your miner

create_miner username "proposal URL" true 

12. Change your signing key to 3rd keypair from suggest_brain_key

update_miner username "proposal URL" public_key3 true 

13. Edit the config.ini again inside /root/.decent/data/decentd/

enable-stale-production = true miner-id = "1.4.X" private-key = ["pub_key3","wif_priv_key3"] 

Your Server is now ready to run a DECENT witness.

Be aware that you should not close your daemon at any time.

V - USEFUL COMMANDS

get_brain_key_info dump_private_keys get_private_key public-key get_account texxi get_miner texxi list_my_accounts list_account_balances texxi set_desired_miner_count username 99 

Now get some support for your miner and join the community!

https://decent-project.slack.com/

You can vote for me and I will gladly return the favor. Please make sure your server runs stable and you're not missing any blocks. Good Luck!

vote_for_miner username texxi true true

All voters will receive early preview access to my first cryptocurrency trading tool to be released in 2018. But remember: Always trade for good and invest in green.

submitted by Texxer to Decentplatform [link] [comments]

Zeus/Gaw ASIC Setup Guide for Linux/Raspberry Pi

So I recently I became quite interested in mining and cyptocurrencies in general. So interested in fact that I bit the bullet and decided to buy myself a GAW Fury.
I then spent some time doing research on how to set up a GAW or Zeus ASIC on Linux, in particular on a Raspberry Pi, and have found most guides to be awful. The reason they are so bad IMHO is that they assume quite a bit of prior knowledge, either with Linux or mining, and give very little instructions. So I have tried to put together a guide that requires very little prior knowledge.
It is my aim that anyone could get their shiny new asic up and mining in no time using this guide. Anyway, I present...

The Complete Noobs Guide to Setting Up a Zeus or Gaw ASIC on Debian/Ubuntu/Raspberry Pi

Resources

About Cyrptocurrencies and Their Jargon

If you are new to cryptocurrencies and how they work I suggest taking a look at this series of KhanAcademy videos. They are for Bitcoin but the theory is the same. I found them very helpful when it came to understanding what mining actually does and the mechanics of cyrptocurrencies.
Also take a look at sircamm22 his info found here, is great and breaks down a large number of concepts. I slightly disagree with no. 21 regarding preordering. Just exercise common sense.

Linux

If you are new to Linux you could follow along by simply typing in the commands. However I highly recommend taking the time to learn what you are doing. This course is a great place to start.

Computer Setup

By the end of this section you will have your device turned on, fully setup and connected to the internet with.
Note: Commands to be typed into the command line will be displayed like this:
echo Hello World

Desktop/Laptop

For laptops and desktops already running Ubuntu or Debian I will assume you have setup your internet setup as part of the installation.
If not: There are plenty of guides out there and the installation/setup process is very easy. A good place to start for Ubuntu is here.
Now open up a terminal window. Ctrl + alt + t on a standard Ubuntu installation.
If you plan on using this PC without a monitor I would suggest installing an SSH Server.
These commands will be discussed later on in the guide.
sudo apt-get -y install openssh-server
sudo service openssh-server start

Raspberry Pi

The Raspberry Pi Foundation has put together a great guide in PDF format.
Use NOOBS it will save you a lot of trouble. NB: Some SD cards don't support NOOBs but will work fine if the image is put on using a different method.
Here is a great guide for setting up the Raspberry Pi SD card from Elinux.org. In fact it's a great place to start for anything RPi related. Raspberry Pi hub at Elinux.
Once the SD card is setup you will need to insert it into the Raspberry Pi and boot. Install Raspbian from the NOOBs menu and wait.
Follow this guide by Adafruit for first time setup. You will need to enable SSH Server.
I suggest not starting the desktop on boot. It can be easily run from the command line by typing startx.
Follow this guide by Adafruit to setup your network. Found here. No need to do this if you set up previously in the first time config.
We will also at this point want to setup ssh. Again I will point you to an Adafruit guide.
Once done exit back to a standard command line interface. This can be done in LXDE by using the power off menu located in the bottom right corner.

Miner Setup

Installing BFGMiner

If you want to the Raspberry Pi or PC without a monitor go ahead and SSH into your device.
So now you should be staring at a command line interface whether on the device with a monitor or via SSH.
First things first lets make sure we are all up to date. This will update our package list from the repositories and upgrade them to the newest version. "-y" Will simply say yes to any prompts.
sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get -y upgrade
We are going to need to install some useful tools. Git-core is how we will clone and download BFGMiner from GitHub and Screen allows multiple command line instances and means if we exit out of ssh session or quit Terminal on Ubuntu, BFGMiner will continue to run.
sudo apt-get install git-core screen
We also need to download some other tools/dependencies to ensure that BFGMiner will compile successfully.
sudo apt-get -y install build-essential autoconf automake libtool pkg-config libcurl4-gnutls-dev libjansson-dev uthash-dev libncursesw5-dev libudev-dev libusb-1.0-0-dev libevent-dev libmicrohttpd-dev libc-bin
Ok now change into your home directory.
cd ~
And clone BFGMiner by Darkwinde.
git clone https://github.com/Darkwinde/bfgminer.git
Once the download has completed move into the bfgminer directory.
cd bfgminer
The following steps may take a while.
Now run autogen.sh
sudo ./autogen.sh
You will need to make the configure script execuitable.
sudo chmod +x ./configure
Now configure bfgminer
sudo ./configure CFLAGS="-O3" --enable-scrypt
Now lets make!
sudo make
Install BFGMiner
sudo make install
One more thing...
sudo ldconfig

Running BFGMiner

If you haven't already plug in your ASIC.
Just confirm your system is recognising the ASIC.
lsusb
Its output should look similar to this (no need to type this in):
Bus 001 Device 005: ID 10c4:ea60 Cygnal Integrated Products, Inc. CP210x UART Bridge / myAVR mySmartUSB light
Yep there it is our ASIC listed as device 005. There is no need to install any drivers, unlike in windows, as they come in the kernel.
Now lets actually start BFGMiner.
You will want to start a screen session to ensure BFGMiner doesn't quite when you exit.
"-S" is the option for starting a new screen session. You can replace "miner" with anything you like.
screen -S miner
Now you can run the commands below.
Here is a sample of what you should type. You will need to replace somethings with your own values.
sudo bfgminer --scrypt -o stratum+tcp://URL:PORT -u USERNAME -p PASSWORD --zeus-cc CHIPCOUNT --zeus-clk 328 -S zeus:/dev/ttyUSB0
Where:
URL:PORT is the address and port of the pool you wih to use. Now I won't suggest a pool. I will leave that decision up to you. If you do wish to mine DOGE take a look at this site for a list of pools and comparisons.
USERNAME this is the username you use on the pool. Every pool is different. Check your pool's website for details. PASSWORD same as above. Specific to your pool, not every pool requires one.
CHIPCOUNT this is specific to which ASIC you are using.
For GAWMiner ASIC's:
  • War Machine: 256
  • Falcon: 128
  • Black Widow: 64
  • Fury: 6
For ZeusMiner ASIC's:
  • Blizzard: 6
  • Cyclone: 96
  • Hurricane X2: 48
  • Hurricane X3: 64
  • Thunder X2: 96
  • Thunder X3: 128
Now to make sure you don't stop mining when you exit ssh or terminal. Press:
ctrl + a + d
To come back to the BFGMiner screen simply run:
screen -r miner
You're done!!

Start on Boot

First off you will want to make sure you have BFGMiner running correctly. Ensure you have the miners set up properly and your pool correctly configured.
Start a BFGMiner instance, detailed above.
Once the instance has started and you are happy with how everything is working press "s" on your keyboard to enter the settings menu.
Now press the "w" key. Don't press enter. We want to specify where our config will go. Type:
/home/USERNAME/bfgminer.conf
Substitute USERNAME for your user. On a standard RPI install its pi. On ubuntu it's what you set during the instillation.
Now press the enter key to return back to the main BFGMiner screen. Press "q" on your keyboard to exit BFGMiner. You should now be back in the command line.
Now we want to edit a file called rc.local. Any commands in this file will be executed on boot.
sudo nano /etc/rc.local
Depending on your system this file may already contain some commands. Be careful not to delete them.
After the last command and before "exit 0" type the following on one line:
sudo -u USERNAME screen -d -m sudo bfgminer --config /home/USERNAME/bfgminer.conf
Where USERNAME = your username
Hit ctrl + x then y to save and exit nano.
The above command will create a new screen session and run bfgminer using the config we created earlier. All while as our username so that we can easily reattach.
Lets reboot to ensure it is working correctly:
sudo reboot
Once rebooted and logged in, show all running screen sessions:
screen -ls
Reattach to the session. You only need to use the numbers before the first dot.
e.g Mine looks like: 2480..hostname (13/07/14 12:02:09) (Detached). So I type:
screen -r 2480
Verify everything worked as expected. Then ctrl + a + d to exit.
You have now setup BFGMiner to restart on reboot.

Power Failure

If you are using a Raspberry Pi and it loses power it will automatically reboot on receiving power again.
For standard desktop PCs there is an option in some BIOS/UEFI to turn the computer on when it receives power. Consult your motherboard's manual and manufacturer's website.

Sources

Here is where I got my info from.
And of course /dogemining

Wrap Up

Congrats you've done it. You have managed to successfully get your shiny new asic mining away.
I do plan to make another guide detailing how to setup and use StarMiner a ready to go RPi mining distro.
So I hope this is helpful for you guys. I have seen lots of posts asking the exact same questions again and again and I have tried to answer these as best I can. I am still learning about this stuff so if there is something I have missed or a mistake I have made please tell me.
Anyway good luck. And I'll see you at the moon.
Cheers Frogsiedoodle
Edit 1: Layout and formatting.
Edit 2: Added instructions for screen which I initially forgot.
Edit 3: Removed 1 unneeded dependency
Edit 4: Added section on start on reboot and power failure.
submitted by Frogsiedoodle to dogemining [link] [comments]

How To Mine Doge with Ubuntu 13.10. (Part 1, for AMD Graphics Cards)

I feel the community really needs a resource like this. Because if I had a Doge for every-time taught a newbie how to Mine on Ubuntu, I would be a very rich doge!
EDIT: Sorry if it looks funny, Reddit doesn't like the numbers I put in for some reason.
If you have Ubuntu you have likely not upgraded because you think you cant mine on 13.10, and while that has been true in the past, a few people have got it figured out. So feel free to upgrade. If you are not on Ubuntu, Seriously you should consider using it. Even if its just on an older desktop.
Alright, so lets get a few things clear, I am assuming that you just FRESHLY installed Ubuntu 13.10 x64 on your system. I am assuming that you have no drivers, and no miners. You will need at least a key board and a mouse. The guide will be done in several parts, this first part is for most AMD Graphics cards. If you have an Nvidia, or just want to mine with your CPU, please check back later for those guides!
When reading this guide, please remember that as I give you commands to type into the terminal, Anything between { and} must be included. Do not copy and paste the {}.
Lets get started, If you have not already done so, Install Ubuntu 13.10 64Bit From Here (http://www.ubuntu.com/index_asus.html)
*1. Lets start by making sure you are up to date. Open up the terminal and enter this:
{sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get upgrade} 
Let that run for a bit.
*2. Once that has finished we are going to download some applications we will need:
{sudo apt-get install dh-make dh-modaliases execstack libxrandr2 libice6 libsm6 libfontconfig1 libxi6 libxcursor1 libgl1-mesa-glx libxinerama1 libqtgui4} 
*3. Once that has run its course we are going to install the ssh server. Remember this command is going to make your computer shut down. While it is shut down, carefully install your graphics cards. If you don't have any experience with this, I suggest you 3 minutes to watch this guide, because failure to install a graphics card the right way can destroy it.
(http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O9x097QRXeA)
{sudo apt-get install openssh-server sudo shutdown now} 
*4.Install your Card(s) and turn the computer back on.
*5. Make a new folder called "AMD DRIVERS123" inside of your download folder. Downoad the following 3 things into that folder. (1. AMD Drivers: http://support.amd.com/en-us/download/incomplete) (2. AMD APP SDK: http://developer.amd.com/tools-and-sdks/heterogeneous-computing/amd-accelerated-parallel-processing-app-sdk/downloads/) (3. AMD ADL SDK:http://developer.amd.com/tools-and-sdks/graphics-development/display-library-adl-sdk/)
*6. Ok, now we need to unzip and compile those drivers. So, open a terminal my right clicking inside of "AMD DRIVERS123". The enter this:
{unzip amd-catalyst*.zip chmod +x amd-catalyst*.run} {sudo ./amd-catalyst*.run --buildpkg Ubuntu/saucy} 
*7. Now we need to install the drivers. Enter the code exactly as you see it, don't worry, the first command will fail, we are expecting it too.
{sudo dpkg -i fglrx*.deb} {sudo apt-get -f install} {sudo dpkg -i fglrx*.deb} {sudo reboot} 
Your computer should now reboot.
(If this failed, you probibly need to remove the old drivers. Do this
{cd /etc/default sudo pico grub} 
Change the line:
GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="quiet splash nomodeset" 
Now save by pressing [CTRL+x]
{sudo update-grub} this will make the change perminent. {sudo reboot -n} Reboot with new settings. Once it starts back up try installing the new drivers again.) 
*8.GREAT! You are really on a roll! Now we need to update AtiConfig
{sudo aticonfig --initial --adapter=all} 
*9.Time to install the APP ADK:
{tar xvf AMD-APP-SDK*.tgz} {sudo ./Install-AMD-APP.sh} {sudo reboot} 
*10. WOOT! You are so close to diggin that sweet Doge!! Its time to download CGMiner. IMPORTANT NOTE! You need to get CGminer 3.7, IT IS THE ONLY ONE THAT WILL WORK. Do not get any older or newer, Just this. :
{sudo apt-get install git unzip git clone -b 3.7 https://github.com/ckolivas/cgminer} 
*11. Ok, now go back to "AMD DRIVERS123", Unzip AMD SDL SDK 6.0. Once you have it unzipped, go the file called "include", open it up, copy everything inside, then go find CGminer. Copy these files into the CGminer file called ADL_SDK.
*12. To install CGminer, we are going to need a few things. Get all of these.
{sudo apt-get install build-essential autoconf libtool libcurl4-openssl-dev libncurses5-dev pkg-config libudev-dev} 
*13. Lets go ahead and compile CGminer.
{cd cgminer} {./autogen.sh} 
*14. Ok, when you did that, it told you GPU was not supported, time to fix it.
{./configure --enable-opencl --enable-scrypt} 
(if you did it right you should now get this: OpenCL...............: FOUND. GPU mining support enabled scrypt...............: Enabled ADL..................: SDK found, GPU monitoring support enabled)
*15. If everything has been good so far then
{make} 
*16. MATHEMATICAL! Now lets get it set up to run a test.
{nano test.sh} {!/bin/bash export DISPLAY=:0 export GPU_MAX_ALLOC_PERCENT=100 export GPU_USE_SYNC_OBJECTS=1} {./cgminer -n} 
*17. Now save by hitting [Control+x][y][Enter]
*18.Lastly lets CHmod test.sh
{chmod+x test.sh} 
*19. TIME TO RUN THE TEXT!!!
{./test.sh} 
(If your output looks like this your ready to go!!! CL Platform 0 vendor: Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. CL Platform 0 name: AMD Accelerated Parallel Processing CL Platform 0 version: OpenCL 1.2 AMD-APP (1214.3) Platform 0 devices: 1 0 Tahiti GPU 0 AMD Radeon HD 7900 Series hardware monitoring enabled 1 GPU devices max detected)
*20. Excellent! Now we have it installed, its time to pick 2-3 pools, and get accounts set up at each of them. I currently use These 2, and If I find another I like I'll update. If you have a really awesome pool you would like me to include on the list, feel free to message me.
Pools: http://doge.cryptovalley.com/ (great community, server not super stable, but they have a chat. I hang out here a lot under the handle 'StrongBad' feel free to stop buy and ask questions)
https://dogehouse.org/ (Super stable pool, Great contests, super friendly, and they pay your miner a bonus if you find the block!)
Choose your pools, go to their sites and sign up. VERY IMPORTANT!!! Use different usernames and passwords for every mining site. If one site gets hacked, you don't want to give them a way to steal everything!!!!! Don't worry about the worker names and passwords being unique or complex tho, the most they can do with this is mine for you.
*21. Ok, now go to the CGminer folder, and open up a Terminal Window.
{sudo ./cgminer} 
This should start ./cgminer up with some really basic settings, and not pointed at any pool. Lets fix that: First press [p] to go to pool settings Now [A] and enter the information for the 1st pool. For instance if you are signing on for dogehouse: (Input server details: stratum+tcp://stratum.dogehouse.org:3333 Username: 'yourusername.workername password: 'yourpassword') If you got no errors, you did it right! Your miner should now connect and start to mine very slowly.
Now, do the same thing for all your other pools. the reason we do this is because Doge Coin pools are constantly being DDoS attacked, and this way your worker automatically switches over to a good pool if one go's down.
*22. time to save your current settings press [Enter] to get back out to the main menu, then [s] to bring up settings. Now press [W] to write a Config file. Name it DogeCoin.conf, and make sure to save it in the location it directs you too.
*23.OK! So, now we have everything set up to its basics. What you need to do now is sit down, and fine tune your Card(s). Its really early in the morning, and I need to get some sleep, I will add more on how to tune your card tomorrow in another post, and link it HERE:
Or, I will help you find the best configuration for your card(s). However as this is quite a bit of work, I do charge a small fee. Contact me with your card(s) information and I will get back to you right away. I generally let you decide how much to pay me.
This is my first ever guide on reddit! If you enjoyed it, or if it helped you please remember to upvote! I am going to start doing an educational YouTube series about Bitcoin, and will likely be doing a side program about Doge, if I find time and funding!! You can find that here: All tips are appreciated! DPTwcQreASwzt6TeWBWFb6Kz9ZU5Sezvr9 If you have any Questions, feel free to ask, I will get back to you ASAP.
Happy Digging everybody!
submitted by Sonofchange to Dogecoinmining [link] [comments]

[P2pool] How to make your own personal p2pool Node!

Tired of getting no block rewards and sending many dead shares? Need a p2pool node close to your miner? MAKE YOUR OWN! :D
And, Yep, P2pools give 0.5% Rewards to block finders!
Here's some info about p2ools: http://whatisp2pool.com/
The stronger the P2Pool network becomes the more resistant the digibyte network is to 51% attacks!
Oh and, P2pools are DDOS proof! Now that's News! So if your node gets DDOS'd .. you dont lose your shares as the shares have been saved in the p2pool, its called the sharechain. So you get paid anyhow! Thanks to the p2pool network. and you ccan set your workers to another pool using the "--failover only" command in cgminer (if im not wrong) and get it back to work on the p2pool network!
TL;DR; P2POOL = 1 Big fat network Decentrazlized pool!
STEPS TO MAKE A P2POOL:
Install Ubuntu server or Desktop if you want http://www.ubuntu.com/download/ or u can use a VPS (VirtualPrivateServer -- Link Below with coupon code)
So Let's start off in the command line (Open Terminal.. and all you have to do is Cut, Copy Paste! ;) )
Start by updating and upgrading Ubuntu, you know you want the best ;)
sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get upgrade sudo apt-get install python-software-properties sudo add-apt-repository ppa:bitcoin/bitcoin sudo apt-get update 
Time for the DigiByteProject dependencies!
sudo apt-get install build-essential libboost-all-dev libcurl4-openssl-dev libdb5.1-dev libdb5.1++-dev git qt-sdk libminiupnpc-dev sudo apt-get install qrencode libqrencode-dev 
And, Now to compile DigiByte on your system!
git clone git://github.com/digibyte/DigiByteProject.git digibyte #renaming makes it easier ;) cd ~/digibyte/src mkdir obj make -f makefile.unix USE_UPNP=- sudo cp digibyted /usbin cd ~ 
After it has compiled try running 'digibyted'
./digibyte/src/digibyted 
If you get an error saying you need to make the digibyte.conf file, good! :) If it doesnt give you that error, make sure you followed the compiling steps appropriately.
So, Lets create the conf file here...
cd .digibyte #edited from 'digibyted' .. fixed!! nano digibyte.conf 
Paste the following, CHANGING THE USERNAME AND PASS!! make sure to take note of both, you'll need these later!
rpcuser=CHANGEusername rpcpassword=ChangePassword daemon=1 server=1 rpcport=14022 port=12024 gen=1 rpcallowip=127.0.0.1 addnode=74.208.230.160 addnode=31.220.25.91 addnode=184.155.218.183 addnode=24.119.23.61 addnode=70.196.193.231 addnode=198.98.118.241 addnode=142.4.204.115 addnode=23.90.191.58 addnode=216.250.125.121 addnode=115.28.31.25 addnode=83.172.105.46 
Press 'CTRL' + ' X', and then 'Y' to save when prompted
cd ~ ./digibyte/src/digibyted ./digibyte/src/digibyted getinfo 
Make sure you check the latest block in the block chain or on your local DigiByte Wallets. This is to see how far your p2pool node has gotten! This is gonna take quite a while so lets CONTINUE!
Let's get the p2pool software and frontend in! Install the p2pool dependencies!
sudo apt-get install python-zope.interface python-twisted python-twisted-web git clone https://github.com/Rav3nPL/p2pool-rav p2pool #renaming it! cd ~/p2pool/digibyte_subsidy #Thanks to Chaeplin sudo python setup.py install 
Time to edit and customise the html code to personalise your p2pool's frontend. Feel free to change the p2pool name and if you're an advanced user, feel free to add your own frontend from git hub after removing the web-static folder. (OPTIONAL: by using rm -f -r web-static #in that directory. And then you can choose whichever frontend you want! by cloning it in the web-static folder)
Editing the current frontend html!
cd .. cd web-static nano index.html 
After personalising the page, i.e. changing the p2pool name and adding some info! Lets go back and check how far the block downloading has gotten! You can check this by typing this in the command line after going back to the root directory:
cd ~ ./digibyte/src/digibyted getinfo 
This is gonna take a while so might as well check for updates again :P
sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get upgrade 
After making sure that all the blocks have been synced locally! We're ready to run the p2pool node! Simply enter the string below in the command line, entering your USERNAME and PASS that you saved earlier!
screen -d -m -S myp2pool ~/p2pool/run_p2pool.py --give-author 0 --net digibyte NEWUSER NEWPASS --outgoing-conns 4 
If you want to charge a fee for your node add this to your string, adding your fee address!:
--fee 1.0 --address NEWDGBADDRESS 
To see if the node is up and running enter this in the command line:
screen -x myp2pool 
'CTRL' + 'A' + 'D' to close the terminal if you press 'CTRL' + 'C', it will terminate the p2pool program and you'll have to restart the pool by using the string above!
Once, Everything is setup as planned! Check your p2pool node's ip Address by entering this into the command line:
ifconfig 
inet addr: 192.168.1.1 #You'll see a line like this.
So, Your cgminer string should look something like this:
cgminer --scrypt -o 192.168.1.1:9022 -u DGBADDRESS -p x
And your p2pool WEB ADDRESS should look like this:
192.168.1.1:9022
example: http://192.168.1.1:9022/
You can monitor your p2pool using that web address! Enjoy, your personal p2pool node!! :D
If for whatever reason the server shuts off and you need to restart the p2pool node, you should run digibyted again and after it has synced successfully, just type in your p2pool string:
./digibyte/src/digibyted
screen -d -m -S myp2pool ~/p2pool/run_p2pool.py --give-author 0 --net digibyte NEWUSER NEWPASS --outgoing-conns 4 --fee 1.0 --address NEWADDRESS
PRESS CTRL + A + D to Detach from screen
UPDATE Follow Guide below if you used this guide before DigibByte v2.0 was released (28th Feb 2014)
You must check whether you're on the right ShareChain. Make Sure the block Value says 7960!
https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=408268.msg5440858#msg5440858
This Tutorial was made with the help of an existing Guide: http://doges.org/index.php?topic=5586.0 Kudos to crypto49er!
If you want to do this on a VPS:
Here's a link to a VPS hosting site:
https://www.digitalocean.com/
Feel free to use my $10 ref. code -- it doesnt really make a difference, though.
https://www.digitalocean.com/?refcode=dc909c442664
Let me know if this guide helped!
submitted by StormMiner to Digibyte [link] [comments]

To help you get started on bitcoins...

Sup fellow reddit members!
Today I'm here to give you guys a long introduction about bitcoins.
Intro to bitcoins:
Bitcoins are the first decentralized digital currency.
Bitcoins are basically digital coins that you can send through the internet.
Some advantages of bitcoins:
  1. It can be transfered through other people without a bank having involved in the transaction.
  2. The transaction fees are much lower.
  3. You can use them in any and every country.
  4. Your account (explained later) can never be frozen.
  5. No limits!
How it works:
There are several online bitcoin currency exchange where you can exchange bitcoins for money and vice versa.
Bitcoins are kept in a digital wallet on your computemobile device. coinbase.com is one of the most trustworthy online bitcoin wallet, IMO.
Sending bitcoins is as simple as sending an email, and you can purchase ANYTHING with bitcoins as long as they accept the currency.
The bitcoin software is completely open-sourced, so anyone can review the code.
Bitcoins are easy + free to setup, and there are no chargebacks!
How to obtain bitcoins:
There are two ways to obtain bitcoins:
  1. Buying them from exchanges/privately. The one that I trust the most is http://www.bitstamp.net.
  2. Mining them using applications. Miners solve math problems/bitcoin algorithms (which takes computing power) and are rewarded bitcoins for doing that. This is the one that I'm going to focus on, as it is pretty hard to grasp.
Mining bitcoins:
Using special software application, you are able to mine bitcoins. Mining means to solve math problems/bitcoin algorithms using your computing power.
Blocks are a chunk of 25 bitcoins, and if you solve one math problem you automatically get a block.
The speed of mining bitcoins is measured in Hashes/Second (KH/s, MH/s, GH/s, TH/s etc.)
The difficulty of the problems gradually increases as more bitcoins are found. Now, it is almost impossible to find bitcoin blocks by yourself, as more than 10 million bitcoins have been mined.
Using special hardware (ASIC, Application-Specific Integrated Circuit chips) that specifically is aimed to mine bitcoins increases your mining speed by a lot. You can buy these hardware anywhere online/offline. amazon.com has many ASIC hardware on sale.
But even ASIC mining can still take a long time to find a block by yourself. That's how the pooled mining began.
Pooled mining basically combines the work of many miners toward a common goal. Pool of miners find the solution of the math problems faster than individuals, and they share the block equally based on each miner's hash rate.
There are many pools right now that are pretty trustworthy, but that one that I use is triple mining: http://evilbeans124.triplemining.com
Mining bitcoins on a Mac:
This part is only dedicated on mining bitcoins for Mac users. If you're a PC user or a Linux/Ubuntu user, skip this.
  1. Go to asteroidapp.com and download the latest version of Asteroid
  2. Open Asteroid
  3. Under Mining Pool, select TripleMining
  4. Hide the application, go to whatever browser you use, and go to http://evilbeans124.triplemining.com
  5. Register for an account
  6. Under the workers tab, add a new worker (on the right side)
  7. Go back to Asteroid, and fill in your worker username + password.
  8. Start mining
  9. You're done
Mining bitcoins on a PC:
This part is only dedicated on mining bitcoins for PC users. If you're a Mac user, view above. If you're a Linux/Ubuntu user, skip this.
  1. Go to https://bitcointalk.org/?topic=3878.0 and download the latest version of GUI miner
  2. Open GUI miner
  3. Select Triplemining for the server
  4. Hide the application, go to whatever browser you use, and go to http://evilbeans124.triplemining.com
  5. Register for an account
  6. Under the workers tab, add a new worker (on the right side)
  7. Go back to GUI miner, enter in your worker username/password
  8. If you have any hardware, then select them in the device tab. If not, skip this step
  9. Start mining
  10. You're done
Mining bitcoins on a Ubuntu/Linux:
This part is only dedicated on mining bitcoins for Linux/Ubuntu users. If you're a Mac or PC user, view above.
Unfortunately, I have no experience in how to install any miner on Linux. The following website does however, so just follow it
http://www.distrogeeks.com/install-cgminer-3-7-2-ubuntu/
The end
I think I covered most of the points on bitcoins. However, if there is any mistakes/stuff that I should add, please put a comment below or PM me! It will be greatly valued!
I spent sometime doing this, so some donation will be very appreciated. My bitcoin address is on my signature.
Credits to bitcoin.com, bitcoinmining.com, triplemining.com/help, http://www.distrogeeks.com/install-cgminer-3-7-2-ubuntu/
Helpful? Considering mining in my pool: http://evilbeans124.triplemining.com (PM me if you STILL don't know how to mine bitcoins) Tip me at: http://evilbeans124.tip.me
submitted by evilbeans124 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Interested in contributing to the BTC community? Here is a exhaustive manual to get you up and running. (Only takes about 20-30 minutes if you are fluent in command prompt on linux).

These instructions will work both on a VPS cloud server or a personal computer. You may find cheap VPS somewhere online for rent.
What Is A Full Node?
A full node is a program that fully validates transactions and blocks. Almost all full nodes also help the network by accepting transactions and blocks from other full nodes, validating those transactions and blocks, and then relaying them to further full nodes.
Most full nodes also serve lightweight clients by allowing them to transmit their transactions to the network and by notifying them when a transaction affects their wallet. If not enough nodes perform this function, clients won’t be able to connect through the peer-to-peer network—they’ll have to use centralized services instead.
Many people and organizations volunteer to run full nodes using spare computing and bandwidth resources—but more volunteers are needed to allow Bitcoin to continue to grow. This document describes how you can help and what helping will cost you.
Costs And Warnings
Running a Bitcoin full node comes with certain costs and can expose you to certain risks. This section will explain those costs and risks so you can decide whether you’re able to help the network.
Special Cases
Miners, businesses, and privacy-conscious users rely on particular behavior from the full nodes they use, so they will often run their own full nodes and take special safety precautions. This document does not cover those precautions—it only describes running a full node to help support the Bitcoin network in general.
Please consult an expert if you need help setting up your full node correctly to handle high-value and privacy-sensitive tasks.
Secure Your Wallet
It’s possible and safe to run a full node to support the network and use its wallet to store your bitcoins, but you must take the same precautions you would when using any Bitcoin wallet. Please see the securing your wallet page for more information.
Minimum Requirements
Bitcoin Core full nodes have certain requirements. If you try running a node on weak hardware, it may work—but you’ll likely spend more time dealing with issues. If you can meet the following requirements, you’ll have an easy-to-use node.
Note: many operating systems today (Windows, Mac, and Linux) enter a low-power mode after the screensaver activates, slowing or halting network traffic. This is often the default setting on laptops and on all Mac OS X laptops and desktops. Check your screensaver settings and disable automatic “sleep” or “suspend” options to ensure you support the network whenever your computer is running.
Possible Problems
Legal: Bitcoin use is prohibited or restricted in some areas.
Bandwidth limits: Some Internet plans will charge an additional amount for any excess upload bandwidth used that isn’t included in the plan. Worse, some providers may terminate your connection without warning because of overuse. We advise that you check whether your Internet connection is subjected to such limitations and monitor your bandwidth use so that you can stop Bitcoin Core before you reach your upload limit.
Anti-virus: Several people have placed parts of known computer viruses in the Bitcoin block chain. This block chain data can’t infect your computer, but some anti-virus programs quarantine the data anyway, making it more difficult to run a full node. This problem mostly affects computers running Windows.
Attack target: People who want to disrupt the Bitcoin network may attack full nodes in ways that will affect other things you do with your computer, such as an attack that limits your available download bandwidth or an attack that prevents you from using your full node’s wallet for sending transactions.
Linux Instructions
The following instructions describe installing Bitcoin Core on Linux systems.
Ubuntu 14.10 Instructions for Bitcoin Core 0.10.0.
If you use Ubuntu Desktop, click the Ubuntu swirl icon to start the Dash and type “term” into the input box. Choose any one of the terminals listed:
Alternatively, access a console or terminal emulator using another method, such as SSH on Ubuntu Server or a terminal launcher in an alternative desktop environment.
Type the following line to add the Bitcoin Personal Package Archive (PPA) to your system:
sudo apt-add-repository ppa:bitcoin/bitcoin
You will be prompted for your user password. Provide it to continue. Afterwards, the following text will be displayed:
Stable Channel of bitcoin-qt and bitcoind for Ubuntu, and their dependencies
More info: https://launchpad.net/~bitcoin/+archive/ubuntu/bitcoin
Press [ENTER] to continue or ctrl-c to cancel adding it
Press enter to continue. The following text (with some variations) will be displayed and you will be returned to the command line prompt:
gpg: keyring /tmp/tmpixuqu73x/secring.gpg' created gpg: keyring/tmp/tmpixuqu73x/pubring.gpg' created gpg: requesting key 8842CE5E from hkp server > > > >keyserver.ubuntu.com gpg: /tmp/tmpixuqu73x/trustdb.gpg: trustdb created gpg: key 8842CE5E: public key "Launchpad PPA for Bitcoin" imported gpg: no ultimately trusted keys found gpg: Total number processed: 1 pg: imported: 1 (RSA: 1) OK
Type the following line to get the most recent list of packages:
sudo apt-get update
A large number of lines will be displayed as different update files are downloaded. This step may take several minutes on a slow Internet connection.
To continue, choose one of the following options
sudo apt-get install bitcoin-qt
sudo apt-get install bitcoind
sudo apt-get install bitcoin-qt bitcoind
After choosing what packages to install, you will be asked whether you want to proceed. Press enter to continue.
If you’re logged in as an administrative user with sudo access, you may log out. The steps in this section should be performed as the user you want to run Bitcoin Core. (If you’re an expert administrator, you can make this a locked account used only by Bitcoin Core.)
Before using the Bitcoin Core daemon, bitcoind, you need to create its configuration file with a user name and password. First create the .bitcoin directory, create (touch) the file, and set the file’s permissions so that only your user account can read it. From the terminal, type:
mkdir ~/.bitcoin touch ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf chmod 600 ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf
Then you can run the command bitcoind. It will print output similar to this:
bitcoind Error: To use the "-server" option, you must set a rpcpassword in the configuration file: /home/bitcoinorg/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf It is recommended you use the following random password: rpcuser=bitcoinrpc rpcpassword=XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX (you do not need to remember this password)
The username and password MUST NOT be the same.
If the file does not exist, create it with owner-readable-only file permissions. It is also recommended to set alertnotify so you are notified of problems; for example: alertnotify=echo %s | mail -s "Bitcoin Alert" [email protected] The “rpcpassword” displayed will be unique for your system. You can copy the rpcuser and rpcpassword lines into your configuration file using the following commands. Note that in most Ubuntu terminals, you need to press Ctrl-Shift-C to copy and Ctrl-Shift-V to paste because Ctrl-C and Ctrl-V have different meanings in a Unix-style terminal.
echo rpcuser=bitcoinrpc >> ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf echo rpcpassword=XXXXXX >> ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf (Warning: Don’t use XXXXXX as your RPC password. Copy the rpcpassword displayed by bitcoind for your system.)
Now you can start Bitcoin Core daemon for real. Type the following command:
bitcoind -daemon
It will print a message that Bitcoin Core is starting. To interact with Bitcoin Core daemon, you will use the command bitcoin-cli (Bitcoin command line interface). Note: it may take up to several minutes for Bitcoin Core to start, during which it will display the following message whenever you use bitcoin-cli:
error: {"code":-28,"message":"Verifying blocks..."}
After it starts, you may find the following commands useful for basic interaction with your node:
to safely stop your node, run the following command:
bitcoin-cli stop
A complete list of commands is available in the Bitcoin.org developer reference.
When Bitcoin Core daemon first starts, it will begin to download the block chain. This step will take at least several hours, and it may take a day or more on a slow Internet connection or with a slow computer. During the download, Bitcoin Core will use a significant part of your connection bandwidth. You can stop Bitcoin Core at any time using the stop command; it will resume from the point where it stopped the next time you start it.
Optional: Start Your Node At Boot
Starting your node automatically each time your computer boots makes it easy for you to contribute to the network. The easiest way to do this is to start Bitcoin Core daemon from your crontab. To edit your crontab, run the following command:
crontab -e
@reboot bitcoind -daemon Save the file and exit; the updated crontab file will be installed for you. Now Bitcoin Core daemon will be automatically started each time your reboot your computer.
If you’re an Ubuntu expert and want to use an init script instead, see this Upstart script.
You have now completed installing Bitcoin Core. If you have any questions, please ask in one of Bitcoin’s many communities, such as Bitcoin StackExchange, BitcoinTalk technical support, or the #bitcoin IRC chatroom on Freenode.
To support the Bitcoin network, you also need to allow incoming connections. Please read the Network Configuration section for details.
Network Configuration
If you want to support the Bitcoin network, you must allow inbound connections.
When Bitcoin Core starts, it establishes 8 outbound connections to other full nodes so it can download the latest blocks and transactions. If you just want to use your full node as a wallet, you don’t need more than these 8 connections—but if you want to support lightweight clients and other full nodes on the network, you must allow inbound connections.
Servers connected directly to the Internet usually don’t require any special configuration. You can use the testing instructions below to confirm your server-based node accepts inbound connections.
Home connections are usually filtered by a router or modem. Bitcoin Core will request your router automatically configure itself to allow inbound connections to Bitcoin’s port, port 8333. Unfortunately many routers don’t allow automatic configuration, so you must manually configure your router. You may also need to configure your firewall to allow inbound connections to port 8333. Please see the following subsections for details.
Testing Connections
The BitNodes project provides an online tool to let you test whether your node accepts inbound connections. To use it, start Bitcoin Core (either the GUI or the daemon), wait 10 minutes, and then visit the GetAddr page (https://getaddr.bitnodes.io/). The tool will attempt to guess your IP address—if the address is wrong (or blank), you will need to enter your address manually.
For more instruction and reviews based off BTC please follow my subreddit /BTC_Reviews
all material from this post was found here --> https://bitcoin.org/en/full-node
submitted by Mattjhagen to rBitcoin [link] [comments]

Running a full node using Bitcoin-daemon. Instructions for Linux.

These instructions will work both on a VPS cloud server or a personal computer. You may find cheap VPS somewhere online for rent.
What Is A Full Node?
A full node is a program that fully validates transactions and blocks. Almost all full nodes also help the network by accepting transactions and blocks from other full nodes, validating those transactions and blocks, and then relaying them to further full nodes.
Most full nodes also serve lightweight clients by allowing them to transmit their transactions to the network and by notifying them when a transaction affects their wallet. If not enough nodes perform this function, clients won’t be able to connect through the peer-to-peer network—they’ll have to use centralized services instead.
Many people and organizations volunteer to run full nodes using spare computing and bandwidth resources—but more volunteers are needed to allow Bitcoin to continue to grow. This document describes how you can help and what helping will cost you.
Costs And Warnings
Running a Bitcoin full node comes with certain costs and can expose you to certain risks. This section will explain those costs and risks so you can decide whether you’re able to help the network.
Special Cases
Miners, businesses, and privacy-conscious users rely on particular behavior from the full nodes they use, so they will often run their own full nodes and take special safety precautions. This document does not cover those precautions—it only describes running a full node to help support the Bitcoin network in general.
Please consult an expert if you need help setting up your full node correctly to handle high-value and privacy-sensitive tasks.
Secure Your Wallet
It’s possible and safe to run a full node to support the network and use its wallet to store your bitcoins, but you must take the same precautions you would when using any Bitcoin wallet. Please see the securing your wallet page for more information.
Minimum Requirements
Bitcoin Core full nodes have certain requirements. If you try running a node on weak hardware, it may work—but you’ll likely spend more time dealing with issues. If you can meet the following requirements, you’ll have an easy-to-use node.
Note: many operating systems today (Windows, Mac, and Linux) enter a low-power mode after the screensaver activates, slowing or halting network traffic. This is often the default setting on laptops and on all Mac OS X laptops and desktops. Check your screensaver settings and disable automatic “sleep” or “suspend” options to ensure you support the network whenever your computer is running.
Possible Problems
Legal: Bitcoin use is prohibited or restricted in some areas.
Bandwidth limits: Some Internet plans will charge an additional amount for any excess upload bandwidth used that isn’t included in the plan. Worse, some providers may terminate your connection without warning because of overuse. We advise that you check whether your Internet connection is subjected to such limitations and monitor your bandwidth use so that you can stop Bitcoin Core before you reach your upload limit.
Anti-virus: Several people have placed parts of known computer viruses in the Bitcoin block chain. This block chain data can’t infect your computer, but some anti-virus programs quarantine the data anyway, making it more difficult to run a full node. This problem mostly affects computers running Windows.
Attack target: People who want to disrupt the Bitcoin network may attack full nodes in ways that will affect other things you do with your computer, such as an attack that limits your available download bandwidth or an attack that prevents you from using your full node’s wallet for sending transactions.
Linux Instructions
The following instructions describe installing Bitcoin Core on Linux systems.
Ubuntu 14.10 Instructions for Bitcoin Core 0.10.0.
If you use Ubuntu Desktop, click the Ubuntu swirl icon to start the Dash and type “term” into the input box. Choose any one of the terminals listed:
Alternatively, access a console or terminal emulator using another method, such as SSH on Ubuntu Server or a terminal launcher in an alternative desktop environment.
Type the following line to add the Bitcoin Personal Package Archive (PPA) to your system:
sudo apt-add-repository ppa:bitcoin/bitcoin
You will be prompted for your user password. Provide it to continue. Afterwards, the following text will be displayed:
Stable Channel of bitcoin-qt and bitcoind for Ubuntu, and their dependencies
More info: https://launchpad.net/~bitcoin/+archive/ubuntu/bitcoin
Press [ENTER] to continue or ctrl-c to cancel adding it
Press enter to continue. The following text (with some variations) will be displayed and you will be returned to the command line prompt:
gpg: keyring /tmp/tmpixuqu73x/secring.gpg' created gpg: keyring/tmp/tmpixuqu73x/pubring.gpg' created gpg: requesting key 8842CE5E from hkp server > > > >keyserver.ubuntu.com gpg: /tmp/tmpixuqu73x/trustdb.gpg: trustdb created gpg: key 8842CE5E: public key "Launchpad PPA for Bitcoin" imported gpg: no ultimately trusted keys found gpg: Total number processed: 1 pg: imported: 1 (RSA: 1) OK
Type the following line to get the most recent list of packages:
sudo apt-get update
A large number of lines will be displayed as different update files are downloaded. This step may take several minutes on a slow Internet connection.
To continue, choose one of the following options
sudo apt-get install bitcoin-qt
sudo apt-get install bitcoind
sudo apt-get install bitcoin-qt bitcoind
After choosing what packages to install, you will be asked whether you want to proceed. Press enter to continue.
If you’re logged in as an administrative user with sudo access, you may log out. The steps in this section should be performed as the user you want to run Bitcoin Core. (If you’re an expert administrator, you can make this a locked account used only by Bitcoin Core.)
Before using the Bitcoin Core daemon, bitcoind, you need to create its configuration file with a user name and password. First create the .bitcoin directory, create (touch) the file, and set the file’s permissions so that only your user account can read it. From the terminal, type:
mkdir ~/.bitcoin touch ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf chmod 600 ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf
Then you can run the command bitcoind. It will print output similar to this:
bitcoind Error: To use the "-server" option, you must set a rpcpassword in the configuration file: /home/bitcoinorg/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf It is recommended you use the following random password: rpcuser=bitcoinrpc rpcpassword=XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX (you do not need to remember this password)
The username and password MUST NOT be the same.
If the file does not exist, create it with owner-readable-only file permissions. It is also recommended to set alertnotify so you are notified of problems; for example: alertnotify=echo %s | mail -s "Bitcoin Alert" [email protected] The “rpcpassword” displayed will be unique for your system. You can copy the rpcuser and rpcpassword lines into your configuration file using the following commands. Note that in most Ubuntu terminals, you need to press Ctrl-Shift-C to copy and Ctrl-Shift-V to paste because Ctrl-C and Ctrl-V have different meanings in a Unix-style terminal.
echo rpcuser=bitcoinrpc >> ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf echo rpcpassword=XXXXXX >> ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf (Warning: Don’t use XXXXXX as your RPC password. Copy the rpcpassword displayed by bitcoind for your system.)
Now you can start Bitcoin Core daemon for real. Type the following command:
bitcoind -daemon
It will print a message that Bitcoin Core is starting. To interact with Bitcoin Core daemon, you will use the command bitcoin-cli (Bitcoin command line interface). Note: it may take up to several minutes for Bitcoin Core to start, during which it will display the following message whenever you use bitcoin-cli:
error: {"code":-28,"message":"Verifying blocks..."}
After it starts, you may find the following commands useful for basic interaction with your node:
to safely stop your node, run the following command:
bitcoin-cli stop
A complete list of commands is available in the Bitcoin.org developer reference.
When Bitcoin Core daemon first starts, it will begin to download the block chain. This step will take at least several hours, and it may take a day or more on a slow Internet connection or with a slow computer. During the download, Bitcoin Core will use a significant part of your connection bandwidth. You can stop Bitcoin Core at any time using the stop command; it will resume from the point where it stopped the next time you start it.
Optional: Start Your Node At Boot
Starting your node automatically each time your computer boots makes it easy for you to contribute to the network. The easiest way to do this is to start Bitcoin Core daemon from your crontab. To edit your crontab, run the following command:
crontab -e
@reboot bitcoind -daemon Save the file and exit; the updated crontab file will be installed for you. Now Bitcoin Core daemon will be automatically started each time your reboot your computer.
If you’re an Ubuntu expert and want to use an init script instead, see this Upstart script.
You have now completed installing Bitcoin Core. If you have any questions, please ask in one of Bitcoin’s many communities, such as Bitcoin StackExchange, BitcoinTalk technical support, or the #bitcoin IRC chatroom on Freenode.
To support the Bitcoin network, you also need to allow incoming connections. Please read the Network Configuration section for details.
Network Configuration
If you want to support the Bitcoin network, you must allow inbound connections.
When Bitcoin Core starts, it establishes 8 outbound connections to other full nodes so it can download the latest blocks and transactions. If you just want to use your full node as a wallet, you don’t need more than these 8 connections—but if you want to support lightweight clients and other full nodes on the network, you must allow inbound connections.
Servers connected directly to the Internet usually don’t require any special configuration. You can use the testing instructions below to confirm your server-based node accepts inbound connections.
Home connections are usually filtered by a router or modem. Bitcoin Core will request your router automatically configure itself to allow inbound connections to Bitcoin’s port, port 8333. Unfortunately many routers don’t allow automatic configuration, so you must manually configure your router. You may also need to configure your firewall to allow inbound connections to port 8333. Please see the following subsections for details.
Testing Connections
The BitNodes project provides an online tool to let you test whether your node accepts inbound connections. To use it, start Bitcoin Core (either the GUI or the daemon), wait 10 minutes, and then visit the GetAddr page (https://getaddr.bitnodes.io/). The tool will attempt to guess your IP address—if the address is wrong (or blank), you will need to enter your address manually.
For more instruction and reviews based off BTC please follow my subreddit /BTC_Reviews
all material from this post was found here --> https://bitcoin.org/en/full-node
submitted by Mattjhagen to BTC_Reviews [link] [comments]

Updated: How to Mine Zcash on Ubuntu - CPU Pool Miner GUIMiner Howto installation and configuration Guide Tuto : Install Crypto Mining Pool - Yiimp (With SSL) on Ubuntu 16.04 Server Tuto : Install Crypto Mining Pool - Yiimp on Ubuntu (Vanilla Yiimp) How to install Network Miner in Kali Linux -- New

WARNING: don't use cpuminer or any miner software on remote hosted machines, it's considered as an abuse of common resources and can be treated as an attack to the hosted system. NOTE: Bitcoin mining is very time consuming and you need a very powerful network of server machines to obtain even a small result (less than a bitcoin in most cases). CCMiner – CUDA Miner. CCMiner stands for Crypto Currency Miner and is an open source software developed specifically for NVIDIA’s CUDA-compatible GPUs. This software is available and works on both Linux and Windows. Since this miner is open source, all versions, source code and download links are available on GitHub. sudo apt-get install libboost-all-dev: sudo add-apt-repository ppa:bitcoin/bitcoin: sudo apt-get update: sudo apt-get install bitcoind: mkdir ~/.bitcoin/ && cd ~/.bitcoin/ nano bitcoin.conf ** Add config to bitcoin.conf file ** rpcuser=username: rpcpassword=password: testnet=1: rpcport=8332: rpcallowip=127.0.0.1: rpcallowip=195.154.11.93 Click the large blue Download Bitcoin Core button to download the Bitcoin Core installer to your desktop. Optional: Verify the release signatures. If you know how to use PGP, you should also click the Verify Release Signatures link on the download page to download a signed list of SHA256 file hashes. Introduction Cgminer is an open source ASIC/FPGA bitcoin miner developed for a range of platforms, including Windows, Linux and OSx. It consists of sophisticated algorithms which are developed with C programming language to utilize the maximum hardware performance to yield a profitable amount of bitcoin with ease depending on the machine’s performance.

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Updated: How to Mine Zcash on Ubuntu - CPU Pool Miner

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