Stocks and bonds | Finance and capital markets - Khan Academy

Weekly Wrap 03/04

Market News
In the earlier part of the week, Bitcoin broke down to the $5800 level but managed to successfully close back above $6400. As expected, we eventually saw a move to the $7200 level that was followed by a swift rejection. Recent CME data released indicates that large-sized traders doubled down on their 2020 short positions between $8200 and $10,700. We are thus expecting the $8000 region to act as a large resistance level in the future.
In a new report, Binance Research found a ‘moderate’ positive correlation between Bitcoin and US equities during the first quarter of 2020, with neither being correlated to gold. Amongst their findings was the conclusion that despite Bitcoin displaying a positive correlation with US equities, this correlation coefficient remains unlikely to persist in the medium to long term as it was merely a result of global investors' flight to liquidity across all asset classes in the wake of COVID-19. This is positive news for investors who continue to use cryptoasset investments for diversification purposes.
Global markets are also up following Trump’s comments that crude oil production will likely be cut back. The announcement sent Brent crude levels up by over 25%. The move comes as oil was already climbing after Beijing instructed government agencies to start buying cheap crude for its strategic reserves.
Industry News
Other News
submitted by Camaa to InvictusCapital [link] [comments]

Weekly Wrap 03/04

Market News
In the earlier part of the week, Bitcoin broke down to the $5800 level but managed to successfully close back above $6400. As expected, we eventually saw a move to the $7200 level that was followed by a swift rejection. Recent CME data released indicates that large-sized traders doubled down on their 2020 short positions between $8200 and $10,700. We are thus expecting the $8000 region to act as a large resistance level in the future.
In a new report, Binance Research found a ‘moderate’ positive correlation between Bitcoin and US equities during the first quarter of 2020, with neither being correlated to gold. Amongst their findings was the conclusion that despite Bitcoin displaying a positive correlation with US equities, this correlation coefficient remains unlikely to persist in the medium to long term as it was merely a result of global investors' flight to liquidity across all asset classes in the wake of COVID-19. This is positive news for investors who continue to use cryptoasset investments for diversification purposes.
Global markets are also up following Trump’s comments that crude oil production will likely be cut back. The announcement sent Brent crude levels up by over 25%. The move comes as oil was already climbing after Beijing instructed government agencies to start buying cheap crude for its strategic reserves.
Industry News
Other News
submitted by Camaa to cryptotwenty [link] [comments]

Educate Yourself Before Using Robinhood

TL;DR: Robinhood is a great way to get into investing, but the market is volatile, even the professionals lose to pure randomness, and so will you. The time-tested strategy is boring, low-cost index funds like VOO that you hold until you die. And you should concentrate on tax-advantaged accounts like your 401K and IRA before any of that.
Edit: I don't mean this to come off as outrage, or imply that Roosterteeth shouldn't be advertising Robinhood. Robinhood is amazing, I personally have had some great success with it, and was even a little excited to see Roosterteeth advertising it. I have also seen plenty of people see its simplicity, assume that's all there is to investing, and make fatal mistakes, often by buying shit options, or assuming Robinhood Gold is free money. I just want to be a quick buffer between that.
I want to start this off by saying that I am in no way a financial expert. I'm an amateur investor who considers themselves reasonably well informed when it comes to finances and investments. I submit this as an introduction to educating yourself, and will list far more quality resources to learn from at the end.
My Concern
Roosterteeth, Funhaus, and other podcasts I listen to have recently been advertising for Robinhood as a simple way to get into investing, with the implication being that investing is what smart, responsible, rich people do, and you should too. But there's some stipulations to this, and I feel Robinhood and Roosterteeth are both a little flippant about the risks involved, especially when introducing large, inexperienced audiences to the investment world. That being said, investing is important to your long-term prosperity, and Robinhood is great with 0 fees, and its simplification of investments that typically sound far more complicated than they are. But it's important to identify your tolerance to risk, and use this to know what investments you're making, and exactly how risky they are. Below I want to give a basic overview of what exactly stocks and options are, how risky they are, and some general advice surrounding them.
What are Stocks?
When a company wants to raise money quickly, but doesn't want to take out loans, they typically decide to go public. This means they split the company up into shares of stock, each of which represents a small piece of the company. These shares each cost a certain amount of money to buy called their share price. At the time of writing, Apple (AAPL) stock is at $207.48, and there are currently 4,829,926,000 shares of Apple out there. Meaning that $207.48 will buy you 1 / 4,829,926,000 of Apple. This also means that Apple as a company is currently worth 4,829,926,000 * $207.48 = $1,002,113,000,000. This price is dictated largely by how confident people are in the future of the company. If a report comes out that Apple is doing really well, the stock price will likely go up, and vice versa.
What are Options?
Options are another security (security is a largely general term used for investments you can buy) that are not stocks themselves, but are contracts regarding what you can do with stocks. They're more complicated than just buying and selling stocks, and can be far more risky. There's a lot to them, but the basic idea is that you are buying the option to buy or sell a stock at a certain price, by a certain time. There are two basic types of options, put and call options. A call option is where you believe that the stock price will go up, a put option is where you believe a stock price will go down. I'll leave Khan Academy to explain the specifics as they can do far better than I. The short and skinny of it being that options are more complicated, riskier, and you should take some serious caution before jumping into this space. Options are where I simultaneously love and hate Robinhood, as they make it very easy for people to understand them, but simultaneously make it far too easy for people who shouldn't be investing in them, to do so.
How Does Robinhood Fit Into This?
Robinhood is a brokerage, which is effectively a store through which you can buy stocks and options. There are tons of brokerages, some popular ones being Schwab, Fidelity, and TD Ameritrade. They all offer different services and products at different prices. The one point we'll focus on is commission fees. A commission fee is how much you are charged for the privilege of buying a stock or option, which is typically around $8 per trade. So if I bought 1 share of Apple for $200, it would usually cost me $208. Robinhood is unique in that it charges $0 per trade. It's also unique in that it's primarily a simple mobile app, while other brokerages are far more complicated.
Robinhood Gold
My immediate advice, do not touch this. My main criticism with Robinhood is not really explaining what this is. It is a loan that you are effectively gambling with. If you are a professional (which means you've gone to school, and gotten a job doing this stuff, not that you've made $1000 on lucky trades) this can be useful. But even the pros get absolutely wrecked by using this kind of stuff, and I absolutely urge you to not touch this. Using Robinhood Gold (otherwise known as margin) in the investing world exposes you to far more risk.
Cool, How Do I Get Rich?
Slowly. There's tons of cases of people making it big with Bitcoin, some bullshit penny stock, or a lucky options trade that makes them millions in a matter of days. These are the exception, not the rule. Smart investing is typically a slow and boring process. Warren Buffett, the greatest investor of all time, espouses the idea of long-term investments in good companies. This has made him one of the richest people in the world, making him someone you want to listen to on the topic. His advice? Don't bother with Robinhood. Use your company's 401K to its fullest extent, and buy boring, stable ETFs. ETFs are a large collection of stocks that track the general direction of the stock market. Over 10, 20, 30 years, these consistently make money. They're not sexy, and won't make you rich in a few days, but will reliably make you comfortable far in the future. These are the responsible thing to do, and will ensure you spend retirement without a lot of stress. Check out /investing's wiki which has a lot of great info on this.
But I Want to be Rich Now!
You won't. Or rather, it's statistically unlikely that you will. The odds are better than if you were buying lottery tickets, but they still aren't great. If however, you've got a gambler's penchant, and are totally fine with losing 100% of your investment in a matter of hours, you can try actively trading options. Once you are done looking through /investing's wiki and have done the responsible thing, I authorize you to do the dumb shit and expose yourself to the whims of luck. A community attempting this path is /wallstreetbets, and they openly joke about how stupid they are for attempting this. They're extremely crass, and exhibit every symptom of a gambling addiction. If you decide to go down this route, you should absolutely only use money you are willing to lose. Treat it like a casino, where you know that eventually, you will absolutely lose all of that money. You're just paying for the hope that you won't.
Further Reading
There's plenty of resources out there, here's a collection of my favorites.
Through the Internet
At your Library
Never pay for investing clubs, or those YouTube channels that have hosts with ferraris telling you they can make you rich. You're buying them the ferraris, when you could have bought a book that will be far more valuable for a fraction of the price.
submitted by watchinggodbleed to roosterteeth [link] [comments]

Story about how I went from having no job, no education and in debt to financially independent in 7 years

In the summer of 2010 I was in my early 20s, took a year off from school and tried working on a business with a friend in the IT field, but the business failed. I was studying Computer Science in college, but was not doing too well. I had my credit cards maxed out at about 20k in debt due to irresponsible spending. I made some money in the past because I worked in the summer in an IT job thanks to a connection, but that opportunity went away. I was living with my parents and wanted ANY job - I was desperate. I tried to get a job at the mall in a clothing store, so I walked around handing out my resume, but failed the interviews. I even interviewed at McDonalds, but they didn't take me. I felt like a loser.

In the fall of 2010 I hit rock bottom and decided to turn things around. I quit smoking and started taking my school seriously, because I realized that it’s my only way out of the mess I was in. I realized that succeeding in business (like Bill Gates) is super hard and started doing pretty well in Computer Science. Later that year I got a job in an electronics store for a few months, at which point I was happy. Later on, I got a part time job in a field related to IT to support myself.

I graduated with debt in 2013 and got an entry level IT job in the city where I grew up, making around 50k a year. I was so happy when I got the offer, but later on I found the job to be boring. My dream was to get into Silicon Valley, so I started learning more about coding and practicing for coding interviews. I was still living with my parents and was slowly paying off my credit cards and student debts.

In early 2014, I interviewed at 2 companies in Silicon Valley and one of them gave me an offer. The salary and stocks offer was much better than I could have dreamed of, including a good signing bonus. That was one of the best days of my life.

I moved and started working. I was saving up most of my money and paying off my debts aggressively. Then, in the winter of 2015, I came across this video on Reddit about Bitcoin. It made an impression on me and I became very curious: what are all those those machines doing? I heard the word Bitcoin before, but had no idea what it was and decided to look into it seriously.

I found a great introduction on Khan Academy (which I already used when I was in school and respected it). I was blown away ... wow that's so clever, I thought. I immediately bought this audiobook, which was recently released at the time and listened to the whole thing in just a few days. I loved the book and learned so much from it: the history of Bitcoin and it discussed things like "why is money valuable at all?".

I was also randomly browsing Wikipedia around this time and came across this page from 2015. I briefly researched the top projects on that page, but what got me interested was item #2: Ethereum. I started researching it on youtube. I found these videos https://youtu.be/l9dpjN3Mwps and https://youtu.be/fbEtivJIfIU and they made SO MUCH sense to me. I also read the white paper like 5 times becoming more and more impressed every time I read it.

I became depressed when I realized that I missed the crowdsale in 2014 and there was no way to invest at that point. I thought that my chance to acquire ETH at a good price was gone forever. I was sure that after it is released the price will be much higher than the crowdsale price of 30 cents per ETH. My thinking at the time was that Ethereum is at least 10 times better than Bitcoin in every possible way and if Bitcoin market cap was a few billion, then ETH should at least match that.

When Ethereum was released in the summer, I started buying it. My debts were paid off by this point thanks to a high salary. The initial price was around $3, but was quickly falling. I was praying that the price falls more and more. The price dropped to below a dollar and I put all of my net worth into it because I thought it was an unbelievable bargain. Every extra penny I had I would put into ETH. I ended up investing around 30k. To me it was so obvious that it is much more valuable than $1 and that people were completely out of their minds for selling it for so low. It felt like people are selling gold bars for a dollar. Bitcoin market cap was a few billion, but Ethereum was something like 50 million AND it is better than Bitcoin in every way by at least 10x I kept telling myself. I remember predicting to people that it will go up 1000x in 10 years. I was talking to some friends about it at the time, but none of them bought as far as I know (until much later).

The price jumped to about $10 in the spring of 2016. I didn’t even think about selling. I held through the DAO hack and DDOS attacks, when the price dropped by more than half. I actually felt that these things are good for the system because it’s antifragile.

In early 2017 the price jumped from $10 to around $30 and I was officially a millionaire. Was I thinking about selling at this point? Hell no, it’s still undervalued! It went to 400, then dropped to 180, slashing my net worth in half and I lost like 10 million on the way down. I still felt it was undervalued at this point. It was kind of crazy: eating lunch with my coworkers, then checking the price and realizing I lost like 1 million in the past hour. And then going to meetings, discussing some bugs or features with my teammates at work.

I did not participate in any ICOs because I felt they were not a good value and if some ICO succeeds, it would be good for Ethereum anyways. I think I’m a pretty unusual crypto investor: I don’t hold any Bitcoins, only ETH and no other tokens. I only used BTC in order to buy ETH in 2015, and converted all of them to ETH ASAP. I remember a friend asking “what is so good about Bitcoin? Is there anything I can buy with Bitcoin, that you can’t with dollars”. I jokingly answered ETH.

I didn’t sell a single ETH until the price hit about $500 in the fall of 2017. At every point before $500, I thought that it was still extremely undervalued. I started selling to diversify. I ended up selling on the way up to $1400 and continued selling until it went down to about $600. I cashed out a few million dollars, about 20% of my holdings. I actually didn't feel great selling, because I still felt that the assets are still more valuable than what I’m getting for them.

After paying taxes, I diversified into stocks and bonds. According to my calculations, I can live comfortably for the rest of my life without working or selling a single ETH again. I quit my job in 2018 and traveled around the world for many months.

I think to myself, did I get lucky? Or am I some kind of investment genius and maybe I should go into angel investing? I looked around for some investment opportunities, but nothing comes close to how I felt about ETH in 2015. Back then it felt to me extremely obvious that this thing is extremely undervalued. I never got that feeling about any other investment since, even though I looked, so I never invested in anything else. I still find it surprising that people were willing to sell ETH for under a dollar just a few years ago.
submitted by ThrowAway329565 to financialindependence [link] [comments]

Educate Yourself Before Using Robinhood (X-Post RoosterTeeth)

TL;DR: Robinhood is a great way to get into investing, but the market is volatile, even the professionals lose to pure randomness, and so will you. The time-tested strategy is boring, low-cost index funds like VOO that you hold until you die. And you should concentrate on tax-advantaged accounts like your 401K and IRA before any of that.
Edit: I don't mean this to come off as outrage, or imply that Roosterteeth shouldn't be advertising Robinhood. Robinhood is amazing, I personally have had some great success with it, and was even a little excited to see Roosterteeth advertising it. I have also seen plenty of people see its simplicity, assume that's all there is to investing, and make fatal mistakes, often by buying shit options, or assuming Robinhood Gold is free money. I just want to be a quick buffer between that.
I want to start this off by saying that I am in no way a financial expert. I'm an amateur investor who considers themselves reasonably well informed when it comes to finances and investments. I submit this as an introduction to educating yourself, and will list far more quality resources to learn from at the end.
My Concern
Roosterteeth, Funhaus, and other podcasts I listen to have recently been advertising for Robinhood as a simple way to get into investing, with the implication being that investing is what smart, responsible, rich people do, and you should too. But there's some stipulations to this, and I feel Robinhood and Roosterteeth are both a little flippant about the risks involved, especially when introducing large, inexperienced audiences to the investment world. That being said, investing is important to your long-term prosperity, and Robinhood is great with 0 fees, and its simplification of investments that typically sound far more complicated than they are. But it's important to identify your tolerance to risk, and use this to know what investments you're making, and exactly how risky they are. Below I want to give a basic overview of what exactly stocks and options are, how risky they are, and some general advice surrounding them.
What are Stocks?
When a company wants to raise money quickly, but doesn't want to take out loans, they typically decide to go public. This means they split the company up into shares of stock, each of which represents a small piece of the company. These shares each cost a certain amount of money to buy called their share price. At the time of writing, Apple (AAPL) stock is at $207.48, and there are currently 4,829,926,000 shares of Apple out there. Meaning that $207.48 will buy you 1 / 4,829,926,000 of Apple. This also means that Apple as a company is currently worth 4,829,926,000 * $207.48 = $1,002,113,000,000. This price is dictated largely by how confident people are in the future of the company. If a report comes out that Apple is doing really well, the stock price will likely go up, and vice versa.
What are Options?
Options are another security (security is a largely general term used for investments you can buy) that are not stocks themselves, but are contracts regarding what you can do with stocks. They're more complicated than just buying and selling stocks, and can be far more risky. There's a lot to them, but the basic idea is that you are buying the option to buy or sell a stock at a certain price, by a certain time. There are two basic types of options, put and call options. A call option is where you believe that the stock price will go up, a put option is where you believe a stock price will go down. I'll leave Khan Academy to explain the specifics as they can do far better than I. The short and skinny of it being that options are more complicated, riskier, and you should take some serious caution before jumping into this space. Options are where I simultaneously love and hate Robinhood, as they make it very easy for people to understand them, but simultaneously make it far too easy for people who shouldn't be investing in them, to do so.
How Does Robinhood Fit Into This?
Robinhood is a brokerage, which is effectively a store through which you can buy stocks and options. There are tons of brokerages, some popular ones being Schwab, Fidelity, and TD Ameritrade. They all offer different services and products at different prices. The one point we'll focus on is commission fees. A commission fee is how much you are charged for the privilege of buying a stock or option, which is typically around $8 per trade. So if I bought 1 share of Apple for $200, it would usually cost me $208. Robinhood is unique in that it charges $0 per trade. It's also unique in that it's primarily a simple mobile app, while other brokerages are far more complicated.
Robinhood Gold
My immediate advice, do not touch this. My main criticism with Robinhood is not really explaining what this is. It is a loan that you are effectively gambling with. If you are a professional (which means you've gone to school, and gotten a job doing this stuff, not that you've made $1000 on lucky trades) this can be useful. But even the pros get absolutely wrecked by using this kind of stuff, and I absolutely urge you to not touch this. Using Robinhood Gold (otherwise known as margin) in the investing world exposes you to far more risk.
Cool, How Do I Get Rich?
Slowly. There's tons of cases of people making it big with Bitcoin, some bullshit penny stock, or a lucky options trade that makes them millions in a matter of days. These are the exception, not the rule. Smart investing is typically a slow and boring process. Warren Buffett, the greatest investor of all time, espouses the idea of long-term investments in good companies. This has made him one of the richest people in the world, making him someone you want to listen to on the topic. His advice? Don't bother with Robinhood. Use your company's 401K to its fullest extent, and buy boring, stable ETFs. ETFs are a large collection of stocks that track the general direction of the stock market. Over 10, 20, 30 years, these consistently make money. They're not sexy, and won't make you rich in a few days, but will reliably make you comfortable far in the future. These are the responsible thing to do, and will ensure you spend retirement without a lot of stress. Check out /investing's wiki which has a lot of great info on this.
But I Want to be Rich Now!
You won't. Or rather, it's statistically unlikely that you will. The odds are better than if you were buying lottery tickets, but they still aren't great. If however, you've got a gambler's penchant, and are totally fine with losing 100% of your investment in a matter of hours, you can try actively trading options. Once you are done looking through /investing's wiki and have done the responsible thing, I authorize you to do the dumb shit and expose yourself to the whims of luck. A community attempting this path is /wallstreetbets, and they openly joke about how stupid they are for attempting this. They're extremely crass, and exhibit every symptom of a gambling addiction. If you decide to go down this route, you should absolutely only use money you are willing to lose. Treat it like a casino, where you know that eventually, you will absolutely lose all of that money. You're just paying for the hope that you won't.
Further Reading
There's plenty of resources out there, here's a collection of my favorites.
Through the Internet
At your Library
Never pay for investing clubs, or those YouTube channels that have hosts with ferraris telling you they can make you rich. You're buying them the ferraris, when you could have bought a book that will be far more valuable for a fraction of the price.
submitted by watchinggodbleed to funhaus [link] [comments]

Subreddit Stats: AskEconomics posts from 2018-07-29 to 2018-10-19 16:52 PDT

Period: 82.20 days
Submissions Comments
Total 984 6990
Rate (per day) 11.97 84.00
Unique Redditors 705 1188
Combined Score 5816 20552

Top Submitters' Top Submissions

  1. 240 points, 28 submissions: benjaminikuta
    1. So, what's the difference between this new trade deal with Mexico and Canada and the old one, and what are the implications? (69 points, 12 comments)
    2. The EU is considering making product life expectancy a mandatory piece of info for consumer electronics. What would the economic implications of that be? (61 points, 24 comments)
    3. What would be a better alternative to Bernie's proposal to tax employers of welfare recipients? (15 points, 68 comments)
    4. What's happening right now with the agriculture industry in South Africa? (15 points, 3 comments)
    5. To what degree is planned obsolescence due to consumer behavior, rather than the other way around? (12 points, 1 comment)
    6. Why do changes in bitcoin price and mining difficulty not have a greater effect on the amount of mining being done? (8 points, 7 comments)
    7. How effectively can negative externalities be quantified? (7 points, 7 comments)
    8. What exactly is "Capitalism" anyway? (7 points, 17 comments)
    9. Are open source projects, such as VLC, subject to market forces? (6 points, 7 comments)
    10. What happened to the agricultural industry in South Africa? (6 points, 0 comments)
  2. 168 points, 37 submissions: Whynvme
    1. When economists refer to industrialization, does it mean a move from agricultural to manufacturing economy? Is the growth in services a different term? (24 points, 6 comments)
    2. Do economists actually calculate consumer surplus empirically, or is it more of s theoretical concept? (19 points, 5 comments)
    3. Does employees of a company with a relatively inelastic demand have an incentive not to care too much? (13 points, 9 comments)
    4. why is ceteris paribus important for analyzing/thinking about the world? (12 points, 7 comments)
    5. Is me making more money than I would necessarily require to work( so more than my 'opportunity wage') for a job an economic inefficiency? or is ineffiency in labor markets a wedge between my marginal revenue product and my wage? (11 points, 3 comments)
    6. With a land value tax, since the supply of land is perfectly inelastic(or less elastic than demand), would theory suggest land owners will pay most of the tax? (10 points, 4 comments)
    7. Are policies such as the gov creating jobs that arent necessary(like gas station attendants) an example of the Broken window fallacy? (7 points, 7 comments)
    8. what is meant by value added? (7 points, 3 comments)
    9. Question about planned economies without price mechanism and forced labor (5 points, 2 comments)
    10. Why does inflation necessarily mean wages will be increasing too? (5 points, 3 comments)
  3. 116 points, 10 submissions: pattersonisagamer
    1. Why do economists believe rent control policies harm the poor instead of carrying out the intent and helping them out greatly? (49 points, 26 comments)
    2. Under Sen Sanders (I-VT) single payer healthcare system he guarantees the average family would pay $466/year on healthcare. Is this true/possible? Would you favor this policy? (27 points, 46 comments)
    3. What is a good type of internship for an undergrad summer going into senior year? (11 points, 6 comments)
    4. What would the economic effect be if the United States removed its $7.25/hr minimum wage? Would you support this? Why/why not? (10 points, 21 comments)
    5. How can you tell if someone's preferences are convex? (7 points, 11 comments)
    6. What is quantitative easing and how does it differ from normal actions taken by the Fed? (4 points, 19 comments)
    7. Is it true that you can make decent money out of college as an independent financial advisor with a BS in Economics/other independent, self employed jobs? (3 points, 6 comments)
    8. What exactly is a negative income tax? Would you support implementing this policy? (3 points, 8 comments)
    9. Carbon tax in the USA? (2 points, 2 comments)
    10. Should we have a central bank? (0 points, 3 comments)
  4. 92 points, 9 submissions: Fart_Gas
    1. Is free public transport a good idea? (44 points, 23 comments)
    2. Will Venezuela's plummeting economy make it a good choice for low-wage industries? (18 points, 8 comments)
    3. Why do some countries without hyperinflation use a foreign currency in everyday life? (10 points, 3 comments)
    4. What might cause sudden inflation? (7 points, 2 comments)
    5. Has any country tried reducing the minimum wage, and ended up with a good result from it? (4 points, 9 comments)
    6. How could ranchers and meat-dependent countries adjust to a world that is switching away from meat due to environmental and health concerns? (3 points, 7 comments)
    7. What is the cause of Taiwan's economic failure? (3 points, 1 comment)
    8. How come rationing in the UK during World War II went rather smoothly? (2 points, 4 comments)
    9. Do boycotts really work? (1 point, 3 comments)
  5. 84 points, 8 submissions: Serpenthrope
    1. Have there been any serious proposals for economic systems that don't use money? (24 points, 67 comments)
    2. Pockets in women's clothing (18 points, 30 comments)
    3. Is there a formal name for this? (16 points, 6 comments)
    4. Could a company ever become quality-control for a market in which they're competing, assuming no government interference? (15 points, 4 comments)
    5. I saw this article on a UN report calling for the dismantling of Capitalism to stop Global Warming, and was wondering what most economists think of the claims? (3 points, 4 comments)
    6. What would the economic impact be if the Extended Family returns? (3 points, 3 comments)
    7. Why are second-hand clothing donations fundamentally different from other types of imports? (3 points, 1 comment)
    8. Peter Navarro and Lyndon Larouche? (2 points, 1 comment)
  6. 80 points, 2 submissions: MrDannyOcean
    1. Announcing a new policy direction for /AskEconomics (68 points, 135 comments)
    2. The new rules for AskEconomics are now in place. Please see the details within. (12 points, 17 comments)
  7. 58 points, 8 submissions: Jollygood156
    1. Why didn't quantitative easing + low interest rates raise inflation high? (20 points, 36 comments)
    2. How do we actually refute MMT? (11 points, 68 comments)
    3. Tax Cuts boost Consumption, but the growth is short term while investments are long term. Why? (11 points, 7 comments)
    4. What is Nominal GDP targeting and why do so many people advocate for it? (6 points, 16 comments)
    5. How exactly are land value taxes calculated? (5 points, 3 comments)
    6. What even is Austerity? (3 points, 3 comments)
    7. During the time of economic upswing is it good to look to balance the budget or run a surplus? (1 point, 7 comments)
    8. How do we know that money is neutral in the longrun? (1 point, 22 comments)
  8. 52 points, 11 submissions: lalze123
    1. Will Bernie's "STOP BEZOS" plan lower the opportunity cost of hiring non-poor workers, thereby harming poor workers? (19 points, 15 comments)
    2. What does the current economic literature say about the effects of net neutrality? (12 points, 0 comments)
    3. What government programs have been empirically proven to help displaced workers from import competition? (5 points, 0 comments)
    4. By how much does lowering the budget deficit lower the trade deficit? (4 points, 4 comments)
    5. How much revenue would a negative income tax require? (3 points, 3 comments)
    6. How would replacing the minimum wage with a negative income tax turn out? (3 points, 4 comments)
    7. Is it possible for advertisements to have signaling effects that are detrimental? (3 points, 3 comments)
    8. Can you have a negative income tax system without inherent tax mechanisms? (1 point, 1 comment)
    9. What are some good studies analyzing the difference in efficiency between markets and central planning? (1 point, 1 comment)
    10. Would economists prefer bilateral/multilateral free trade agreements or unilateral free trade? (1 point, 4 comments)
  9. 48 points, 6 submissions: CanadianAsshole1
    1. If free trade is so good, then why do countries insist on making trade deals? Why can't we just abolish all tariffs? (17 points, 11 comments)
    2. Does the wage gap still exist after controlling for factors like education, career choice, and hours worked (13 points, 39 comments)
    3. Do I understand the problem with"trickle-down" economics correctly? (8 points, 38 comments)
    4. If climate change is such a huge problem, then why aren't countries utilizing nuclear energy more? (6 points, 17 comments)
    5. How much of the Reagan administration's deficits could be attributed to increased defense spending? (3 points, 3 comments)
    6. If automation will result in less jobs, then shouldn't the government stop incentivizing childbirth through tax credits and stop immigration? (1 point, 12 comments)
  10. 48 points, 1 submission: Traveledfarwestward
    1. What do most Economists think about The Economist? (48 points, 26 comments)
  11. 46 points, 8 submissions: Chumbaka
    1. Why is inflation and deflation bad? (12 points, 8 comments)
    2. Can a monopoly also be a monopsony? (10 points, 13 comments)
    3. Can anyone explain why this happens and what it means? (10 points, 3 comments)
    4. Stupid question but : Why does printing lots of money lead to inflation? (5 points, 14 comments)
    5. What do you think of Khan's Academy Economy lessons? (4 points, 2 comments)
    6. What does this stock market fall mean to the economy as a whole? (4 points, 4 comments)
    7. How would an universal free market deal with situations like NK? (1 point, 21 comments)
    8. How do I pick an economist ideology to support? (0 points, 3 comments)
  12. 46 points, 2 submissions: prman222
    1. What is the difference in knowledge between academic economists(Krugman, Acemoglu, Mankiw etc) and hedge fund managers and the like(Soros, James Simons)? (44 points, 5 comments)
    2. is a recession likely to come by 2020? (2 points, 11 comments)
  13. 46 points, 1 submission: TheHoleInMoi
    1. Are there any papers/solid arguments about the benefits of having more local business as opposed to corporate consolidation? (46 points, 2 comments)
  14. 44 points, 1 submission: Akehc99
    1. Those who went into the job market after an Econ Undergrad, what do you do and briefly what does it entail? (44 points, 27 comments)
  15. 44 points, 1 submission: piltonpfizerwallace
    1. What would happen if the US printed $12.3 trillion tomorrow and paid off all of its debt? (44 points, 30 comments)
  16. 43 points, 2 submissions: ConditionalDew
    1. How much would the iPhone be if it was made in the US? (41 points, 15 comments)
    2. Who are some famous people/celebrities that were economics majors? (2 points, 2 comments)
  17. 42 points, 1 submission: Turnt_Up_For_What
    1. You've just been declared supreme potentate of Venezuela. Now how do you fix the economy? (42 points, 24 comments)
  18. 42 points, 1 submission: rangerlinks
    1. Who are the best economist to follow on Twitter? (42 points, 16 comments)
  19. 41 points, 5 submissions: TeaRev1ew
    1. Is there any basis to the theoretic economics of Anarchism? Could such a system work outside of coffee shops/other low level enterprises? (15 points, 18 comments)
    2. Are sovereign wealth funds a new phenomenon? (12 points, 1 comment)
    3. How do state funded enterprises lead to corruption? Is there a difference between developed and developing nations (or a patron-client relationship)? (6 points, 11 comments)
    4. How does releasing a new currency curb inflation in the era of fiat? (5 points, 5 comments)
    5. How do companies do business in states where their government doesn't recognize the sovereign entity? (3 points, 1 comment)
  20. 36 points, 1 submission: JeffGotSwags
    1. What are the most commonly held misconceptions about economics among people with at least some background? (36 points, 34 comments)

Top Commenters

  1. BainCapitalist (2631 points, 654 comments)
  2. RobThorpe (864 points, 280 comments)
  3. zzzzz94 (719 points, 147 comments)
  4. Calvo_fairy (715 points, 198 comments)
  5. smalleconomist (605 points, 179 comments)
  6. Cross_Keynesian (489 points, 94 comments)
  7. bbqroast (458 points, 103 comments)
  8. penguin_rider222 (428 points, 128 comments)
  9. riggorous (330 points, 115 comments)
  10. Integralds (326 points, 65 comments)
  11. whyrat (314 points, 68 comments)
  12. MrDannyOcean (248 points, 42 comments)
  13. isntanywhere (201 points, 64 comments)
  14. RedditUser91805 (179 points, 30 comments)
  15. emeraldcity27 (161 points, 8 comments)
  16. CapitalismAndFreedom (143 points, 66 comments)
  17. raptorman556 (142 points, 34 comments)
  18. LucasCritique (132 points, 30 comments)
  19. lawrencekhoo (129 points, 19 comments)
  20. roboczar (120 points, 21 comments)

Top Submissions

  1. So, what's the difference between this new trade deal with Mexico and Canada and the old one, and what are the implications? by benjaminikuta (69 points, 12 comments)
  2. Announcing a new policy direction for /AskEconomics by MrDannyOcean (68 points, 135 comments)
  3. The EU is considering making product life expectancy a mandatory piece of info for consumer electronics. What would the economic implications of that be? by benjaminikuta (61 points, 24 comments)
  4. Why do economists believe rent control policies harm the poor instead of carrying out the intent and helping them out greatly? by pattersonisagamer (49 points, 26 comments)
  5. What do most Economists think about The Economist? by Traveledfarwestward (48 points, 26 comments)
  6. Are there any papers/solid arguments about the benefits of having more local business as opposed to corporate consolidation? by TheHoleInMoi (46 points, 2 comments)
  7. What would happen if the US printed $12.3 trillion tomorrow and paid off all of its debt? by piltonpfizerwallace (44 points, 30 comments)
  8. Those who went into the job market after an Econ Undergrad, what do you do and briefly what does it entail? by Akehc99 (44 points, 27 comments)
  9. Is free public transport a good idea? by Fart_Gas (44 points, 23 comments)
  10. What is the difference in knowledge between academic economists(Krugman, Acemoglu, Mankiw etc) and hedge fund managers and the like(Soros, James Simons)? by prman222 (44 points, 5 comments)

Top Comments

  1. 124 points: emeraldcity27's comment in Why do economists believe rent control policies harm the poor instead of carrying out the intent and helping them out greatly?
  2. 74 points: BainCapitalist's comment in What would happen if the US corporate income tax was abolished?
  3. 56 points: Calvo_fairy's comment in Could someone explain the wage gap and whether it's a myth or not.
  4. 56 points: RedditUser91805's comment in The EU is considering making product life expectancy a mandatory piece of info for consumer electronics. What would the economic implications of that be?
  5. 55 points: TheBellmanHimself's comment in Why is the Soviet Union generally considered to be a "failure"?
  6. 55 points: hbtn's comment in Why are Little Caesar's cheese pizzas the same price as its pepperoni pizzas?
  7. 54 points: arctigos's comment in What do most Economists think about The Economist?
  8. 49 points: sethg's comment in Why do economists believe rent control policies harm the poor instead of carrying out the intent and helping them out greatly?
  9. 47 points: RedditUser91805's comment in You've just been declared supreme potentate of Venezuela. Now how do you fix the economy?
  10. 47 points: smalleconomist's comment in What are the most commonly held misconceptions about economics among people with at least some background?
Generated with BBoe's Subreddit Stats
submitted by subreddit_stats to subreddit_stats [link] [comments]

Bitcoin 2017 a Comprehensive Timeline

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submitted by BitcoinChronicler to btc [link] [comments]

Supercharging primecoin and this subreddit

Hey folks,
So this subreddit hasn't been that popular and so I have some projects on the pipeline right now specifically based on primecoin that might be helpful. I have been working on these for a while and hope to get this all pushed out by June-July. This subreddit has a lot of potential and I think we can use it to promote primecoin!
  1. First and foremost: We need to spread more awareness about what primecoin is and how is it different, this is not your usual scrypt coin and has significant scientific value. I was thinking about making a 5-6 video course, like khan academy did for bitcoin on what primecoin is and how it's different. It's not that difficult to do but I need to have a better understanding of the basics and for that I need to ask you guys to point me to where to go in terms of literature and reading. Don't worry I'm not a n00b so I can catch on fairly quick.
  2. Another thing is the android wallet, I think it might be doable by forking one of the popular android wallets, I'm starting to work on it and will report my progress soon on it.
  3. We need to specifically purpose this coin, I love dogecoin because of the value behind it being used for tipping, in a way it shows respect towards the authomakecreator for what they have done on the internet. Any coin is only as good as the infrastructure supporting it so I will make a subreddit primecoininfra/ for that. I think primecoin can be used to re-purpose almost anything scientific. There are many projects out there for instance at CERN and so on, that we can donate to. Another area really is research for non-profits for diseases and the like, so that's one way to go about it and get publicity, trust me fellows if we give primcoin the kickstart that it needs, it will rise very very easily.
  4. Going off what I mentioned in 3, I will be launching a primecoin startup support platform. What that means is, it will be just like a sort of kickstarter but for scientific projects only. These projects will require moderate amount of funding and thus can be launched with moderate community interest.
  5. Another thing from the kickstarter that I would like to do is to build a stocks-platform for lifescience (there can be other categories) ventures. The idea here would be to open up new venues for folks to propose their startup-ideas who already have some funding. Then to get more funding for development they can post a kickstarter backer reward type system, if you give us x amount, you'll get y amount of shares of this startup, if that makes any sense. This again is all to purpose primecoin sort of how devcoin is made to support open source porjects and so on.
Primecoin can be the backbone of promoting startups and the scientific economy. What do you guys think? Please let me know more about your thoughts and if you guys are working on similar projects. PM me if you're interested on working on some of this stuff with me, I'd love to get more ppl to work on these projects!
submitted by blindswordsman to primecoin [link] [comments]

Blockchain protocol vs Bitcoin vs bitcoins

There seems to be a lot of confusion in this sub about what Bitcoin is. Everyone feels the need to weigh in on why it's tulip mania, why it's the best thing ever, etc. I just want to make some demarcations in the reality of the thing so it can be talked about more accurately.
First, "blockchain protocol". A blockchain protocol is a cryptographic method to ensure a trusted network without having any centralized trusted party. The short of it is that it solves the Byzantine Generals problem with a method based on proof-of-work cryptography. This is a new technology, something that has not existed before its invention by Satoshi Nakamoto in 2008. What this enables is the transmission of ownership through the internet without a trusted third party. It eliminates counterparty risk, as payments are push only, and are verified or not verified at the time of transaction. It also enables digital scarcity.
Next, "Bitcoin". Bitcoin is a specific implementation of a blockchain protocol. It is a brand name, a flavor if you will. It has many shortcomings, weaknesses, and these weaknesses are not present in some other implementations of blockchain protocol. These other implementations are called alt-coins because their market cap is not close to Bitcoin's. Bitcoin currently has $7.9B market cap, while 2nd and 3rd place have $441M (litecoin) and $69M (peercoin).
Next, "bitcoins" (small b, plural). These are the units of account in the Bitcoin brand, abbreviated as BTC. These are the things that are currently trading for $631 each. There was an arbitrary number created at the beginning, and currently 25 more are created every 10 minutes. People accept them as payment because it can be used as payment. The amount of these is scheduled to inflate at a very regular schedule, and will cap at 21 million.
Regardless of whether you believe that Bitcoin the brand will be successful, or that bitcoins the unit will have different value in the future, the importance of blockchain based protocols can not be underestimated. They can be used for currency (such as with BTC, LTC, PPC, etc), but can also be used to track ownership of goods like homes, cars, even stocks. This technology along with a scripting language like Ethereum enables fully autonomous capital flows, which may lead to autonomous corporations. A decentralized stock market could open here, and a company could list their stock without getting any regulatory system involved - the terms of the IPO would be visible to everyone on the network instantly.
There is a lot more to Bitcoin. Khan Academy has a good introduction here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/money-and-banking/bitcoin/v/bitcoin-what-is-it
I posted this here because this technology has huge ramifications to the financial world, and also because I believe Bitcoin has a very large first mover advantage in this space (making it a reasonable investment).
submitted by Polycephal_Lee to investing [link] [comments]

Stocks and bonds  Finance and Capital Markets  Khan Academy Bitcoin: What is it?  Money, banking and central banks  Finance & Capital Markets  Khan Academy Bitcoin - Khan Academy - YouTube Basic shorting  Stocks and bonds  Finance & Capital Markets  Khan Academy

If you're behind a web filter, please make sure that the domains *.kastatic.org and *.kasandbox.org are unblocked. Then, in early 2014, I watched a “What is Bitcoin?” video on Khan Academy and realised I didn’t understand money at all. I understood numbers, and conflated them with “money,” as most Khan Academy – Bitcoin Udemy – Bitcoin or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Crypto Coursera – Cryptocurrency University of Nicosia – Introduction to Digital Currencies 10 Hours of Bitcoin Crypto Dictionary Bitcoin stock to flow model live chart Google Trends : Search Term “Bitcoin” Over the next few years, Bitcoin’s price fluctuated heavily - when it managed to reach and climb over the $1 mark, it was a great day for the coin and some people considered that Bitcoin had actually “made it”. As the years went by, Bitcoin gained more and more traction. Khan Academy is a nonprofit with a mission to provide a free, world-class education for anyone, anywhere. We use intelligent software, data analytics, and intuitive user interfaces to help

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Stocks and bonds Finance and Capital Markets Khan Academy

Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: Learn about bitcoins and how they work. Videos by Zulfikar Ramzan. Zulfikar is a world-leading expert in computer security and cryptography and is ... About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the ... Save Money - Buy company stock direct - Direct Stock Purchase Plans. ... 📌 INVEST IN BITCOIN WITH COINBASE EARN $10 OF FREE BITCOIN! ... Khan Academy 588,911 views. 13:47. Stocks and bonds Finance and Capital Markets Khan Academy Khan Academy; 42 videos; 50,132 views; Last updated on Jul 2, 2018 Khan Academy is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization with the mission of providing a free, world-class education for anyone, anywhere. Our interactive practice...

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