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A few stories about Brian Krebs: The independent cybercrime journalist who exposes criminals on the internet

First, a bit of introduction before we get into the living drama that is Brian Krebs.
Brian Krebs has been a journalist for decades, starting in the late 90s. He got his start at The Washington Post, but what he's most famous for are his exposes on criminal businesses and individuals who perpetuate cyber crime worldwide. In 2001, he got his interest in cybercrime piqued when a computer worm locked him out of his own computer. In 2005, he shifted from working as a staff writer at The Washington Post's tech newswire to writing for their security blog, "Security Wire". During his tenure there, he started by focusing on the victims of cybercrime, but later also started to focus on the perpetrators of it as well. His reporting helped lead to the shutdown of McColo, a hosting provider who provided service to some of the world's biggest spammers and hackers. Reports analyzing the shutdown of McColo estimated that global spam volume dropped by between 40 and 70 percent. Further analysis revealed it also played host to child pornography sites, and the Russian Business Network, a major Russian cybercrime ring.
In 2009, Krebs left to start his own site, KrebsOnSecurity. Since then, he's been credited with being the first to report on major events such as Stuxnet and when Target was breached, resulting in the leakage of 40 million cards. He also regularly investigates and reveals criminals' identities on his site. The latter has made him the bane of the world of cybercrime, as well as basically a meme, where criminals will include references like Made by Brian Krebs in their code, or name their shops full of stolen credit cards after him.
One of his first posts on his new site was a selection of his best work. While not particularly dramatic, they serve as an excellent example of dogged investigative work, and his series reveal the trail of takedowns his work has documented, or even contributed to.
And now, a selection of drama involving Krebs. Note, all posts are sarcastically-tinged retellings of the source material which I will link throughout. I also didn't use the real names in my retellings, but they are in the source material. This took way too long to write, and it still does massively condense the events described in the series. Krebs has been involved with feuds with other figures, but I'd argue these tales are the "main" bits of drama that are most suited for here.

Fly on the Wall

By 2013, Krebs was no stranger to cybercriminals taking the fight to the real world. He was swatted previously to the point where the police actually know to give him a ring and see if there'd actually been a murder, or if it was just those wacky hackers at it again. In addition, his identity was basically common knowledge to cybercriminals, who would open lines of credit in his name, or find ways to send him money using stolen credit cards.
However, one particular campaign against him caught his eye. A hacker known as "Fly" aka "Flycracker" aka "MUXACC1" posted on a Russian-language fraud forum he administered about a "Krebs fund". His plan was simple. Raise Bitcoin to buy Heroin off of a darknet marketplace, address it to Krebs, and alert his local police via a spoofed phone call. Now, because Krebs is an investigative journalist, he develops undercover presences on cybercrime forums, and it just so happened he'd built up a presence on this one already.
Guys, it became known recently that Brian Krebs is a heroin addict and he desperately needs the smack, so we have started the "Helping Brian Fund", and shortly we will create a bitcoin wallet called "Drugs for Krebs" which we will use to buy him the purest heroin on the Silk Road. My friends, his withdrawal is very bad, let’s join forces to help the guy! We will save Brian from the acute heroin withdrawal and the world will get slightly better!
Fly had first caught Krebs' attention by taunting him on Twitter, sending him Tweets including insults and abuse, and totally-legit looking links. Probably either laced with malware, or designed to get Krebs' IP. He also took to posting personal details such as Krebs' credit report, directions to his house, and pictures of his front door on LiveJournal, of all places.
So, after spotting the scheme, he alerted his local police that he'd probably have someone sending him some China White. Sure enough, the ne'er-do-wells managed to raise 2 BTC, which at the time was a cool $200 or so. They created an account on the premiere darknet site at the time, The Silk Road under the foolproof name "briankrebs7". They found one seller who had consistently high reviews, but the deal fell through for unknown reasons. My personal theory is the seller decided to Google where it was going, and realized sending a gram of dope into the waiting arms of local law enforcement probably wasn't the best use of his time. Still, the forum members persevered, and found another seller who was running a buy 10 get 2 free promotion. $165 of Bitcoin later, the drugs were on their way to a new home. The seller apparently informed Fly that the shipment should arrive by Tuesday, a fact which he gleefully shared with the forum.
While our intrepid hero had no doubt that the forum members were determined to help him grab the tail of the dragon, he's not one to assume without confirmation, and enlisted the help of a graduate student at UCSD who was researching Bitcoin and anonymity on The Silk Road, and confirmed the address shared by Fly was used to deposit 2 BTC into an account known to be used for money management on the site.
By Monday, an envelope from Chicago had arrived, containing a copy of Chicago confidential. Taped inside were tiny baggies filled with the purported heroin. Either dedicated to satisfied customers, or mathematically challenged, the seller had included thirteen baggies instead of the twelve advertised. A police officer arrived to take a report and whisked the baggies away.
Now, Fly was upset that Krebs wasn't in handcuffs for drug possession, and decided to follow up his stunt by sending Krebs a floral arrangement shaped like a cross, and an accompanying threatening message addressed to his wife, the dire tone slightly undercut by the fact that it was signed "Velvet Crabs". Krebs' curiosity was already piqued from the shenanigans with the heroin, but with the arrival of the flowers decided to dive deeper into the сука behind things.
He began digging into databases from carding sites that had been hacked, but got his first major breakthrough to his identity from a Russian computer forensics firm. Fly had maintained an account on a now-defunct hacking forum, whose database was breached under "Flycracker". It turns out, the email Flycracker had used was also hacked at some point, and a source told Krebs that the email was full of reports from a keylogger Fly had installed on his wife's computer. Now, because presumably his wife wasn't part of, or perhaps even privy to her husband's illicit dealings, her email account happened to be her full legal name, which Krebs was able to trace to her husband. Now, around this time, the site Fly maintained disappeared from the web, and administrators on another major fraud forum started purging his account. This is a step they typically take when they suspect a member has been apprehended by authorities. Nobody knew for sure, but they didn't want to take any chances.
More research by Krebs revealed that the criminals' intuition had been correct, and Fly was arrested in Italy, carrying documents under an assumed name. He was sitting in an Italian jail, awaiting potential extradition to the United States, as well as potentially facing charges in Italy. This was relayed to Krebs by a law enforcement official who simply said "The Fly has been swatted". (Presumably while slowly removing a pair of aviator sunglasses)
While Fly may have been put away, the story between Krebs and Fly wasn't quite over. He did end up being extradited to the US for prosecution, but while imprisoned in Italy, Fly actually started sending Krebs letters. Understandably distrustful after the whole "heroin" thing, his contacts in federal law enforcement tested the letter, and found it to be clean. Inside, there was a heartfelt and personal letter, apologizing for fucking with Krebs in so many ways. He also forgave Krebs for posting his identity online, leading him to muse that perhaps Fly was working through a twelve-step program. In December, he received another letter, this time a simple postcard with a cheerful message wishing him a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year. Krebs concluded his post thusly:
Cybercrooks have done some pretty crazy stuff to me in response to my reporting about them. But I don’t normally get this kind of closure. I look forward to meeting with Fly in person one day soon now that he will be just a short train ride away. And he may be here for some time: If convicted on all charges, Fly faces up to 30 years in U.S. federal prison.
Fly ultimately was extradited. He plead guilty and was sentenced to 41 months in jail

vDOS and Mirai Break The Internet

Criminals are none too happy when they find their businesses and identities on the front page of KrebsOnSecurity. It usually means law enforcement isn't far behind. One such business was known as vDOS. A DDOS-for-hire (also known as a "booter" or a "stresser") site that found itself hacked, with all their customer records still in their databases leaked. Analysis of the records found that in a four-month time span, the service had been responsible for about 8.81 years worth of attack time, meaning on average at any given second, there were 26 simultaneous attacks running. Interestingly, the hack of vDOS came about from another DDOS-for-hire site, who as it turns out was simply reselling services provided by vDOS. They were far from the only one. vDOS appeared to provide firepower to a large number of different resellers.
In addition to the attack logs, support messages were also among the data stolen. This contained some complaints from various clients who complained they were unable to launch attacks against Israeli IPs. This is a common tactic by hackers to try and avoid unwanted attention from authorities in their country of residence. This was confirmed when two men from Israel were arrested for their involvement in owning and running vDOS. However, this was just the beginning for this bit of drama.
The two men arrested went by the handles "applej4ck" and "Raziel". They had recently published a paper on DDOS attack methods in an online Israeli security magazine. Interestingly, on the same day the men were arrested, questioned, and released on bail, vDOS went offline. Not because it had been taken down by Israeli authorities, not because they had shut it down themselves, but because a DDOS protection firm, BackConnect Security, had hijacked the IP addresses belonging to the company. To spare a lot of technical detail, it's called a BGP hijack, and it basically works by a company saying "Yeah, those are our addresses." It's kind of amazing how much of the internet is basically just secured by the digital equivalent of pinky swears. You can read some more technical detail on Wikipedia. Anyway, we'll get back to BackConnect.
Following the publication of the story uncovering the inner workings of vDOS, KrebsOnSecurity was hit with a record breaking DDOS attack, that peaked at 620/Gbps, nearly double the most powerful DDOS attack previously on record. To put that in perspective, that's enough bandwidth to download 5 simultaneous copies of Interstellar in 4K resolution every single second, and still have room to spare. The attack was so devastating, Akamai, one of the largest providers of DDOS protection in the world had to drop Krebs as a pro bono client. Luckily, Google was willing to step in and place his site under the protection of Google's Project Shield, a free service designed to protect the news sites and journalists from being knocked offline by DDOS attacks.
This attack was apparently in retaliation for the vDOS story, since some of the data sent in the attack included the string "freeapplej4ck". The attack was executed by a botnet of Internet of Things (or IoT) devices. These are those "smart" devices like camera systems, routers, DVRs. Basically things that connect to the cloud. An astounding amount of those are secured with default passwords that can be easily looked up from various sites or even the manufacturers' websites. This was the start of a discovery of a massive botnet that had been growing for years.
Now time for a couple quick side stories:
Dyn, a company who provides DNS to many major companies including Twitter, Reddit, and others came under attack, leaving many sites (including Twitter and Reddit) faltering in the wake of it. Potentially due to one of their engineers' collaboration with Krebs on another story. It turned out that the same botnet that attacked Krebs' site was at least part of the attack on Dyn
And back to BackConnect, that DDOS protection firm that hijacked the IP addresses from vDOS. Well it turns out BGP Hijacks are old hat for the company. They had done it at least 17 times before. Including at least once (purportedly with permission) for the address 1.3.3.7. Aka, "leet". It turns out one of the co-founders of BackConnect actually posted screenshots of him visiting sites that tell you your public IP address in a DDOS mitigation industry chat, showing it as 1.3.3.7. They also used a BGP Hijack against a hosting company and tried to frame a rival DDOS mitigation provider.
Finally, another provider, Datawagon was interestingly implicated in hosting DDOS-for-hire sites while offering DDOS protection. In a Skype conversation where the founder of Datawagon wanted to talk about that time he registered dominos.pizza and got sued for it, he brings up scanning the internet for vulnerable routers completely unprompted. Following the publication of the story about BackConnect, in which he was included in, he was incensed about his portrayal, and argued with Krebs over Skype before Krebs ultimately ended up blocking him. He was subsequently flooded with fake contact requests from bogus or hacked Skype accounts. Shortly thereafter, the record-breaking DDOS attack rained down upon his site.
Back to the main tale!
So, it turns out the botnet of IoT devices was puppeteered by a malware called Mirai. How did it get its name? Well, that's the name its creator gave it, after an anime called Mirai Nikki. How did this name come to light? The creator posted the source code online. (The name part, not the origin. The origin didn't come 'til later.) The post purported that they'd picked it up from somewhere in their travels as a DDOS industry professional. It turns out this is a semi-common tactic when miscreants fear that law enforcement might come looking for them, and having the only copy of the source code of a malware in existence is a pretty strong indicator that you have something to do with it. So, releasing the source to the world gives a veneer of plausible deniability should that eventuality come to pass. So who was this mysterious benefactor of malware source? They went by the name "Anna-senpai".
As research on the Mirai botnet grew, and more malware authors incorporated parts of Mirai's source code into their own attacks, attention on the botnet increased, and on the people behind it. The attention was presumably the reason why Hackforums, the forum where the source code was posted, later disallowed ostensible "Server Stress Tester" services from being sold on it. By December, "Operation Tarpit" had wrought 34 arrests and over a hundred "knock and talk" interviews questioning people about their involvement.
By January, things started to come crashing down. Krebs published an extensive exposé on Anna-senpai detailing all the evidence linking them to the creation of Mirai. The post was so big, he included a damn glossary. What sparked the largest botnet the internet had ever seen? Minecraft. Minecraft servers are big business. A popular one can earn tens of thousands of dollars per month from people buying powers, building space, or other things. It's also a fiercely competitive business, with hundreds of servers vying for players. It turns out that things may have started, as with another set of companies, two rival DDOS mitigation providers competing for customers. ProTraf was a provider of such mitigation technology, and a company whose owner later worked for ProTraf had on at least one occasion hijacked addresses belonging to another company, ProxyPipe. ProxyPipe had also been hit with DDOS attacks they suspected to be launched by ProTraf.
While looking into the President of ProTraf, Krebs realized he'd seen the relatively uncommon combination of programming languages and skills posted by the President somewhere else. They were shared by Anna-senpai on Hackforums. As Krebs dug deeper and deeper into Anna-senpai's online presence, he uncovered other usernames, including one he traced to some Minecraft forums where a photoshopped picture of a still from Pulp Fiction contained the faces of BackConnect, which was a rival to ProTraf's DDOS mitigation business, and another face. A hacker by the name of Vyp0r, who another employee of ProTraf claimed betrayed his trust and blackmailed him into posting the source of another piece of malware called Bashlite. There was also a third character photoshopped into the image. An anime character named "Yamada" from a movie called B Gata H Hei.
Interestingly, under the same username, Krebs found a "MyAnimeList" profile which, out of 9 titles it had marked as watched, were B Gata H Hei, as well as Mirai Nikki, the show from which Mirai derived its name. It continues on with other evidence, including DDOS attacks against Rutgers University, but in short, there was little doubt in the identity of "Anna-senpai", but the person behind the identity did contact Krebs to comment. He denied any involvement in Mirai or DDOS attacks.
"I don’t think there are enough facts to definitively point the finger at me," [Anna-senpai] said. "Besides this article, I was pretty much a nobody. No history of doing this kind of stuff, nothing that points to any kind of sociopathic behavior. Which is what the author is, a sociopath."
He did, however, correct Krebs on the name of B Gata H Kei.
Epilogue
Needless to say, the Mirai botnet crew was caught, but managed to avoid jailtime thanks to their cooperation with the government. That's not to say they went unpunished. Anna-senpai was sentenced to 6 months confinement, 2500 hours of community service, and they may have to pay up to $8.6 million in restitution for their attacks on Rutgers university.

Other Stories

I don't have the time or energy to write another effortpost, and as is I'm over 20,000 characters, so here's a few other tidbits of Krebs' clashes with miscreants.
submitted by HereComesMyDingDong to internetdrama [link] [comments]

Beginner’s Guide to Exchanges – Part 1

Beginner’s Guide to Exchanges – Part 1

Hola Compadres! It is me u/poop_dragon here with another guide. Today I would like to run through a list of ETH exchanges. This is just Part 1 of this list, and it covers established exchanges. Soon I will post Part 2 and 3 which will go into some other types of exchanges (derivative markets, coin converters, decentralized, and foreign exchanges) Side note, I have given rating to these exchanges based on some comparisons, news, and information which I have found online. Recently, EVERY exchange has been slow/unresponsive in their customer service due to the huge influx of new users. My intention is to help educate new users about the exchanges available. I am not trying to discredit, advertise, pump up, or damage reputations. If you feel something is inaccurate, please respectfully bring it up in the comments. I will be editing as we go. Last thing of note, I have only included the lowest level trading tier to calculate trading fees, which assumes the highest rates. Most exchanges offer lower fees for bigger orders, but I have gone with the assumption that everyone here is not dropping whale amounts of cash.

00 – Concepts and Definitions

01 –Digital Exchanges

Poloniex

Exchange Type Maker Taker
All Currencies .15% .25%
Feature Details
2FA Google Authenticator Available
Wallet Security ‘Majority’ of Funds in cold storage
Personal Information Encrypted and Stored Off-Site
Tier Level Name Email DOB Phone Address Official ID Bank Info KYC Limits
Level 1 X X $2,000 USD Daily Withdrawal Limit
Level 2 X X X X X X $7,000 USD Daily Withdrawal Limit
Level 3 X X X X X X $25,000 USD Daily Withdrawal Limit
Level 4 X X X X X X X X >$25,000 USD Daily Withdrawal Limit
What is a KYC? It stands for Know Your Customer Documentation. This varies between exchanges. However, like most things, if you have to ask, you probably can’t afford it.

Bittrex

Exchange Type Maker Taker
All Currencies .25% .25%
Feature Details
2FA Google Authenticator Available
Wallet Security Multi-stage wallet Majority’ of Funds in cold storage
Personal Information IP Whitelisting restricts trading from new addresses
Tier Level Name Email DOB Phone Address Official ID Bank Info KYC Limits
Basic X X X 3 BTC or less daily
Enhanced X X X X X X 100 BTC or less daily

02– Fiat Exchanges - USA

Coinbase (GDAX)

Country Credit/Debit Linked Bank Account Wire Transfer
Australia 3.99% - -
Canada 3.99% - -
Europe 3.99% 1.49% SEPA- Free (€0.15)
Singapore 3.99% 1.49% -
UK 3.99% - SEPA Free (€0.15)
US 3.99% 1.49% $10 Deposit / $25 With / ACH Free
Exchange Type Maker Taker
ETH/FIAT 0% .30%
ETH/BTC 0% .30%
Tier Level Name Email DOB Phone Address Official ID Bank Info KYC Limits
Level 1 X X X
Level 2 X X X X X Crypto Only
Level 3 X X X X X X X Fiat Enabled
Level 4 X X X X X X X X Higher Fiat Limits
Feature Details
2FA Google Authenticator, Authy, SMS
Wallet Security 98% Assets in Cold Storage
Personal Information 3rd Party Verified, Secured, Stored Offline
Digital Currency Insurance Fully Insured by Lloyd’s of London
Fiat Insurance Up to $250,000 by FDIC
Bug Bounty Multiple bounties up to $10,000

Kraken

Country Linked Bank Account Wire Transfer
EUR Free SEPA €5-10 (€0.09 Withdrawal)
US Free SWIFT $10 ($60 Withdrawal)
UK Free SWIFT £10 (£60 Withdrawal)
CAN Free SWIFT Free ($10 Withdrawal)
Exchange Type Maker Taker
ETH/FIAT .16% .26%
ETH/BTC .16% .26%
Tier Level Name Email DOB Phone Address Official ID Bank Info KYC Limits
Level 0 X No Trading Allowed
Level 1 X X X X No Fiat, Unlimited Crypto
Level 2 X X X X Fiat $2,000Day/$10,000Mo
Level 3 X X X X X X Fiat $25,000Day/$200,000Mo
Level 4 X X X X X X X X Fiat $100,000Day/$500,000Mo
Feature Details
2FA Google Authenticator, Master Key Available
Wallet Security Majority Assets in Cold Storage
Personal Information PGP Encrypted Emails, Global Settings Lock
Digital Currency Insurance Maintain Full Reserves
Bug Bounty Multiple bounties

Gemini

Country Linked Bank Account Wire Transfer
USD Free Free
Exchange Type Maker Taker
ETH/ALL .10-.25% .25%
Tier Level Name Email DOB Phone Address Official ID Bank Info KYC Limits
Individual X X X X X X X None - Except for ACH
Feature Details
2FA Google Authenticator, Authy Available
Hot Wallet Security Hot Wallet Hosted by Amazon Web Services
Cold Wallet Stored in 2 tiers of cold and 'cryo' multi-sig storage
Personal Information Encrypted in Transit and Stored Offline
Digital Currency Insurance Fidelity bond by 'top-tier insurance company'
Fiat Insurance Up to $250,000 by FDIC

03– Fiat Exchanges - Hong Kong

Bitfinex

Country Credit/Debit Bank Transfer Express Bank Transfer
ALL - .1% ($20 Minimum) 1% ($20 Minimum)
Exchange Type Maker Taker
ETH/ALL .10% .20%
Tier Level Name Email DOB Phone Address Official ID Bank Info KYC Limits
Individual X X X X X X (2) X X No Stated Limits
Feature Details
2FA Google Authenticator, Twilio Available
Account Security New IP Addresses locked for 24 hours, require verification and detection
System Security Hosted and Backed-up on Linux, protection from DDoS
Personal Information Email encryption with OpenPGP
Wallet Security Only .5% of funds are stored in hot wallets
EDIT : Thank you to u/Ginger_Bearded_Man for the suggestion. Bittrex has been added.
submitted by poop_dragon to ethtrader [link] [comments]

Beginner's Guide to Exchanges - Part 2

Beginner’s Guide to Exchanges – Part 2

A little late, but as promised here is Part 2 of the Beginner’s Guide to Exchanges. I would like to sincerely thank everyone for their support and feedback in making these.
Link to Part 1
This time I also made a Google Docs survey in the hopes of sharing the results with the community. I thought we could share what we use as a whole and why redditors choose the exchanges they do. For skeptics (as you all should be), I assure you that I am not collecting personal information. This is for recreation and if you are still wary, then by all means abstain!
Link to Survey
In Part 3 I will be wrapping up this series by covering decentralized, semi-decentralized, and derivative exchanges. Here it goes!

00 – Concepts and Definitions (Continued)

04 – Fiat Exchanges – Canada

QuadrigaCX

Country Linked Bank Transfer Wire Transfer Paypal Credit/Debit Crypto Transfer
CAD Deposit 1%/ Withdraw Free Free Free (Withdraw Only) 1% (Withdraw Only) Free
USD - Free Free (Withdraw Only) - Free
Exchange Type Maker Taker
Fiat .5% .5%
BTC/ETH .2% .2%
Feature Details
2FA Google Authenticator or Email 2FA Available
Wallet Security Undisclosed amount of funds in cold storage
Web Security 3rd Party Security provided by CloudFlare
Bug Bounty Expired $50 bounties
Tier Level Name Email DOB Phone Address Official ID Bank Info Credit Score Limits
Basic Account X X Digital only, Limits Vary
Verified Account X X X X X X Limits Vary

05 – Fiat Exchanges – Europe

CEX.IO

Country Credit/Debit Bank Transfer Crypto Transfer
Europe 3.5%+ €0.24 Deposit €0 / Withdraw €25 (SEPA €10) Free
Russia 5% + ₽ 15.57 - -
UK 3.5%+ £0.20 Deposit £0 / Withdraw £20 (SEPA Free
US 3.5%+ $0.25 Deposit $0 / Withdraw $50 Deposit $0 / Withdraw 1%
Exchange Type Maker Taker
All Currencies 0% .20%
Feature Details
2FA Google Authenticator Available
Wallet Security Undisclosed amount of funds in cold storage
Credit Card Data Overseen by 3rd Party Kyte Consultants
Web Security SSL Certificates and Encrypted Personal Data
Tier Level Name Email DOB Phone Address ID + Photo Bank Info KYC Limits
Basic Account X X X Digital only
Verified Account X X X X X X $10,000 Daily/$100,000 Monthly

BTC-E / XBTC-E

Country Credit/Debit Bank Transfer Paypal
Europe - SEPA - Deposit .5% / Withdraw 1% (€100 min) -
Russia 6% 6% -
US 7% Deposit .5% ($20 min) / Withdraw 1% ($100 min) 7%
Exchange Type Maker Taker
All Currencies .20% .20%
Feature Details
2FA Google Authenticator Available
Password Expiration Must be changed every 6 months
DDoS Protection 3rd Party Security Services provided by CloudFlare
Bug Bounty Yes at xBTCe
Tier Level Name Email DOB Phone Address Official ID Bank Info KYC Limits
Verified User X X X X X No Stated Limits

Liqui.io

Exchange Type Maker Taker
All Digital Currencies 0.1% .25%
Feature Details
2FA Google Authenticator Available
Bug Bounty Reported bounty posted on HackerOne (unconfirmed)

06 – Fiat Exchanges – South Korea

안녕하세요 여러분! 혹시 우리 한국인 친구 이 보고서를 한국어로 읽고 싶어한다면 알려주세요. 관심이 많이 있다면 간단한 한국어 보고서도 만들 수 있습니다. This year, ETH has taken off like a rocket in the Land of the Morning Calm. With a population of just 50 million, South Koreans account for almost 30% of daily ETH trade volume. Even more surprising is that currently the daily volume of ETH is about 5 times higher than that of Bitcoin on Korean exchanges. Since demand is high, ETH is trading at a premium on Korean exchanges. Some users have been talking about capitalizing off this imbalance by trading on arbitrage between exchanges. For those who have no connection to Korea and hope to do so, I have bad news – all Korean exchanges require a National ID number and access to a Korean bank account. This makes Korean exchanges virtually closed to Korean nationals and those with long-term visas. Sorry everyone.

Bithumb

Coinone

Korbit

07 – Fiat Exchanges – China

With a great deal of anticipation, major Chinese exchanges started trading ETH this summer. Since these exchanges deal huge volumes of Bitcoin already, naturally it was expected that they invest heavily into ETH as well. So far this hasn’t quite lived up to the hype with many exchanges still favoring Bitcoin, Litecoin, Altcoins, and even Ethereum Classic (Gulp). Three of these exchanges underwent inspections by the Peoples Bank of China earlier this year and will be working closely with the government to ease fears of money laundering and market manipulation. There are a lot of Chinese sites, and since my Chinese is non-existent this list is basically just for name recognition. In many ways these sites are very similar in regards to security, verification, and fees compared to their western counterparts; just marketed at a different audience and currency. If users are seriously interested in these exchanges and making reviews, please contribute or ask!

OK Coin

Huobi

CH-BTC

Yunbi

08 – Coinswaps & Cryto-converters

ShapeShift

Changelly

submitted by poop_dragon to ethtrader [link] [comments]

Kaizen Ico : Interview with Fund Manager

Nearly a fourth of its way to completion. I took a moment to catch up with the Fund Manager for the ongoing Kaizen ICO.
https://steemit.com/ico/@cryptokage/kaizen-ico-a-word-with-its-fund-manager
The Kaizen Coin Ico has begun and the cryptokage wanted to know more! Emailing the newly appointed fund manager we discussed the project and learned a little bit about the man behind the coin, Lawrence Fischer.
Originally in an advisory position for the ICO, the thirty-nine (39) year old financial adviser was asked to take over as fund manager amidst changes by the SEC, (DAO tokens became recognized as unregulated securities). When asked about the change in team he responded;
"One problem we have had is the SEC. As all 3 people listed have securities careers up until recently the recent rulings by the SEC basically have scared a lot of people in our sector."
When confronted by the lack of team information on the website he half-jokingly yet poignantly remarked;
" I personally hate social media. I do not have a twitter (outside of the Kaizen one), I have never had the need for a LinkdIn account as I have been working for myself in crypto trading for the last several years. I honestly don't see the need to have my personal life on a pedestal. I am a boring financial guy that sits for 15 hours a day staring at 4 monitors looking for signs of life in a coin."
Understanding his attitude helps to explain the whitepaper which has been criticized as short and bland.
"I actually wish more whitepapers got rid of all the marketing crap and just made the whitepapers about 2 pages. Basically give me the highlights. Kaizen Coin is basically a collection of crypto currency and it pays a dividend in ethereum each quarter. That's all I would have put in the whitepaper. "
I asked him how he got into crypto;
"I got into crypto how a lot of people did, through a friend. Only mine paid a $50 bet he lost with me in 5,000 bitcoin. The terms of the deal were $50, not $50 in bitcoin that I couldn't see, touch, feel. I basically had to take his word on it that it was worth anything at all, and I seriously considered suing his ass. There was no coinbase or Gemini for me to withdraw to fiat. Because it was a low dollar amount, I gave up after a few hours trying to get to it. I later sold it for $500,000. That gave me some financial independence but not enough to go off of for life. It also taught me that there is something to this crypto thing and to be honest, I was a bit embarrassed for not having seen it. I began immersing myself in bitcoin and altcoins. I got in with Ethereum as a new issue and rode that. Late 2015, I began giving friends bitcoin wallets on their cellphones and $50 (what I originally received) and just told them to wait. They told friends and before long I was heading a small investment club. My phone was blowing up for investment advice. I began making youtube videos with several of my picks and the people that came to me had more and more money. I still respond to text messages all hours of the day and night. It is the fuel that keeps me going. Having a education background in sociology and mathematics, I understand and can predict a lot of human behavior. I think this has always been a key in hype with altcoins. As Kaizen gets bigger, I will be bringing on another person. I have actually begun talking to a jr staffer at a VC firm in San Francisco. The hope is he can start looking at some of these ICO through venture capitalists eyes."
Mr Fischer not only has the international resources (The Uruguay HQ location) but the technical and technological capabilities to see such a plan through. Having worked with mining platforms he is well envisioned and prepared for the security challenges holding a digital fund presents.
"Security is very important. For security reasons I cannot go into all measures, but a few of the precautionary ones are as follows: We tweeted the contract address 2 days prior to the launch in regards to some recent coin hacks. As we aren't 'day trading' the accounts, funds are left offline in paper wallets or hardware wallets. Only 2 people have access to funds. We do not advertise where we are located or even a phone number. There is no reason for anyone to visit or call. We are aware of social engineering attempts and actually have a security specialist coming out a week from tomorrow to go over things and inform us of any weaknesses and what we can do better. One area we do not take lightly."
On the more technological standpoint when asked about the change in token strategy he responded;
"The dividends in the form of KZN coin was actually the original plan. We ran with that in an earlier versions of the whitepaper that was sent out to media, coin listing sites, etc. We scrapped that idea as we are minting a finite number of coins with no coins ever being minted further. This would at some point implode the fund or cause it to buyback tokens at a potential premium. We decided a couple weeks before launch to simply make the quarterly dividend payouts using Ethereum to the wallet address the tokens are in. We will be posting both buys and sells after they complete on the site and most likely facebook. There will be monthly progress checks we make internally as well as an audit every 6 months to account for everything. All of this will be posted on the site whether good or bad."
According to coinschedule.com the Kaizen Ico is 19.58% complete and is a day away from completing its Pre-ICO sale.
"We are getting ready to launch some ad campaigns. If target not reached, we will setup a buy wall on one of the exchanges at the price people bought in on and allow people to cash out that no longer want to be involved. Those that do will continue on with us"
Kaizen is not the first crypto fund project and like a lot of Ico's it will be put under a lot of social media scrutiny. I asked Lawrence of any potential problems presented with such a business model?
"I assume you mean a small caliber office like us? Walk into a big chain retail store, then into a small boutique. There is a difference. TAAS fund got to market before us. They are a little bigger. Everyone yelled scam and shitcoin when they started their ICO. They just made their first dividend payment and it was huge. Find me a mutual fund that has a 61% quarterly dividend. We are doing the exact same thing as TAAS, but we have a smaller staff so instead of us keeping 25% profits for ourselves, we keep 5%. I have worked for mutual funds and they could not and would not ever compete with the returns. And that is why sometimes the little guy wins."
So what is stopping lawrence from just running off with the money?
" To be honest, I guess nothing at all physically. People have instilled a trust in us and we plan to reward them with high yields. Over the last few years, I have made more in bitcoin and altcoins that the KaizenCoin is worth, even at the total sellout level. I don't care for flashy things. I still drive a 2014 Toyota Camry. I always thought at this point I was supposed to have a lambo but that really isn't what interests me. If i just one day closed up shop and ran, i'd probably never see my kids/wife again. I am not the type of guy that wants to live life looking over his shoulder either. I like to think I was raised better than that too. In high school I'd go to the movies with all my friends. The plan was to buy one ticket and go from movie to movie once we were inside, theater hop. I always made sure I was the last to buy tickets and i'd buy tickets for all the shows we were planning to see. No one ever checked, my friends never got caught either. I just did it because it was the right thing to do. If I couldn't steal a $4 movie, grand larceny is completely out. I am actually still pondering this question as it is a good question and really should be one I ask before investing in ICO's. I guess whenever a new coin is started, there is hope for a legacy to be built. I don't know if that is the case with me."
In conclusion only time will tell what the Kaizen coin will bring but if this mans words are anything to be believed, Kaizen not only will happen but it may be a force.
I personally will be having a punt and will update here with the results. First dividend is expected in December, will a fool be parted with his money? or will he be rewarded for his intrigue?
*As always, this is not financial advice. Always question the bias of the author and their perspective.
submitted by CryptoKage to icocrypto [link] [comments]

Why You Should Have Mobile Payments in Your App

Hey /gamedev,
I think everyone knows the importance of IAPs. Found this article that might be helpful (full article here). Hope ya'll find it helpful.
Ever since our smartphone’s displays started growing, the number of people using them for different purposes started growing with them. Interestingly enough, we also started measuring how long we used our phones and for what purpose, and realized that the time we spent in apps has also grown dramatically. At this point, there’s no questioning that we live in a mobile-first world.
Accordingly, we also have begun to like to use our smartphones to buy things. Last time we checked, more than a third (39 per cent) of people used their smartphones for shopping.
Now, when we combine that knowledge with a few educated assumptions that both the number of smartphone users, app users, and the percentage of those using the device to purchase things will continue to grow, it brings us to a simple conclusion that there is huge demand for mobile payment.
Ever since 1999, when Ericsson and Telnor Mobil allowed us to buy movie tickets with our mobile phones, the rush towards a better, more reliable and more convenient mobile payment solution never stopped. Already, in 2009, there have been close to 100 million people making purchases via mobile devices, and once Google joined the bandwagon in 2011 by releasing Google Wallet, there was no turning back.

Why we like mobile payment

The reasons are simple, and are pretty much the same as they’ve always been – we humans like our payment systems fast, convenient, safe and transactional. On the other hand, big mobile players like Google and Apple saw an opportunity to make extra profits by tapping into the mobile payment industry. You already had the device in your pocket – they only needed to show you how to use it.
Mobile payment has significantly altered digital payments, in two big ways. First – a couple of new devices were created, some exclusively for that purpose – like the contactless payment card (first one issued byBarclaycard in 2007), or the smartwatch (sure, it has other uses too, but mobile payment is arguably at its core).
Second, mobile payment has made us focus greatly on security – prior to mobile payments, security (and this is particularly true for smartphones and mobile phones) revolved around passwords and PIN codes. Today, we have fingerprint scanners, iris scanners, facial recognition technology, two-factor authentications everywhere, you name it. We’ve learned, and we’re still learning, how to keep our digital assets secure.
This second point is quite important, too. Today’s smartphones basically hold our lives together. We don’t need to remind you of all the things you have on your phone, and unless you keep it safe, you’re in for a world of pain. That’s why it is so essential to implement mobile payment correctly.
From this intro, we can conclude two things:
  1. Mobile payment is everywhere, and if you’re not in on the action, be sure your competitors are. Mobile commerce is currently worth $230 billion, and by this time next year, will most likely hit $700 billion. This is a race you don’t want to finish last in.
  2. Mobile payment must be implemented correctly, or else. Fail to implement it properly, and you can end up being elbowed out of business completely, ruining your image and UX in the process. It really is that serious.

Tapping into mobile payment

Deciding to add mobile payment to your apps is the first, and probably most important step – but the journey can also be involved and perilous. At the core of building a proper mobile payment system for your app, are four elements: Trust, User Experience, Security and Platforms.

Trust

If we had to triage everything, and just focus on one element of the mobile payment system, this would be it. Without trust (especially in the post-Snowden world of today), nothing else matters. You need to have a system people can trust, and you can (and should) achieve that by focusing on:
  1. Transparency – Be completely open about which data you are using, which permissions you’re asking for and why, and give your users total control over both data and permissions. You can actually make them work for you – not against you.
  2. Communication and error feedback – Remember that time when you paid your bills via mobile app, but weren’t completely sure if the transaction went through or not? Remember how calling your provider and finding the right person to confirm this took ages, and how upset and annoyed you were? Making this process as seamless (and rare) as possible is the way towards your customers’ hearts

User Experience

This really should go without saying, but the user experience (UX) will determine if people will come back to your app or not, and if they’ll be willing to recommend it to their friends and family. If for no other reason, than for this Avanade report, Customer Experiences and Your Bottom Line, which basically says that for every extra dollar you invest into customer experience, you can expect three back.
“Almost half of those surveyed have experienced increased customer loyalty over the past 12 months by prioritizing a customer experience strategy,” Scott Anderson, Chief Marketing Officer at Sitecore said when they announced these results.
So what makes a quality user experience for mobile payments? Think about how you like your mobile payments to be. You’d most likely want them to be:
Obviously, with such an important and big element to any app, things like bugs, errors and crashes are bound to happen. Constant monitoring and optimization of your UX, through qualitative analytics, will allow you to quickly spot and eliminate any issues. App analytics can often be confusing, giving you a bunch of numbers that you can’t really put to good use. Qualitative analytics can literally put you in your users’ shoes, helping you better understand the hows and the whys of the complete user experience, from first contact, to the last one.

Security

Third make-or-break element of implementing a solid mobile payment solution is security. Remember the Anthem hack, back in 2015? How about the eBay one from 2014? Target one from 2013? JP Morgan Chase? Sony Entertainment? LinkedIn? Home Depot? MySpace? Data breaches are everywhere, and some reports out there suggest that there isn’t a single company out there safe, regardless of its size, or business type.
Sure, a data breach can cost you serious money. It might take time to get your app back up and running. It might cost a little extra to do all the forensics in the aftermath. It will definitely cost a little extra to fix all the holes you failed to patch up in the first place, not to mention settling any lawsuits which might come flying your way if you compromised user data (especially if that data is money-related).
But it’s not just money. A compromised mobile app can ruin your reputation, and in the long-term, that can be even more devastating. For example, this CSO report says reputational damage following a data breach is real, and its results might be hard on your bottom line. Just look at the chart below.
A OnePoll survey of 2,000 consumers says that 86 percent were ‘not at all likely’, or ‘not very likely’ to continue doing business with a breached company. We can argue that no one is ever completely safe, and that could be true – which is why having continuous quality assurance is essential. Scrutinize your security as much as you can, and constantly keep an eye out on it. Only by staying vigilant and implementing proper security initiatives/safeguards can you keep your users safe and grow your business.

Platforms

Finally – the only actual “dilemma” in the article is whether to use a pre-existing mobile payment platform, such as PayPal or Stripe, or to go with your own, developed from scratch. Both ways have their pros and cons, and should be chosen depending on your current financial, experience, and manpower situation.
By going for a pre-existing platform, you can skip the long and tedious task of coding, and let people who’ve been ‘in the zone’ for quite some time now do the heavy lifting for you. But – it comes with a price, and as long as that price is lower than what you’d need to pay for a team of developers, security experts, compliance experts, user experience analysts and testers – go for it.
Pre-existing platforms automatically handle the following key issues:
*Security *– Measures such as SSL certificates, or HTTPS will already be taken care of. They’re extremely important as it’s known that consumers won’t buy through unprotected apps.
*Anti-fraud compliance *– Payment Card Industry Compliance, Data Security Standard, or PCI-DSS. According to this blog post by Yalantis, becoming PCI certified can take months. If you’re interested in getting your app’s payment system up and running as fast as possible, you should avoid building it from scratch.
*Feature variety *– From a user experience point of view, this is essential. Big players offer a wide variety of features – that can be various types of payment (one-time or recurring, for example), different types of authentication (tokens, for example), or analytics and reporting. Creating and adding new features every once in awhile can take up a lot of your time and resources.
Those are the key elements a pre-existing platform can help you with. The heavyweights in this industry are PayPal, *Stripe *and *Braintree *(owned by PayPal). The difference between them is in the features they offer, their pricing, and the ease and speed of integration.
For software developer Pete Keen, the latter is ‘pretty important’:
“Having a pre-made integration or a reasonable API is important for getting payments up and running as fast as possible,” he told Thinkapps.
Let’s take a look further at what these platforms have to offer:

Stripe

Braintree

PayPal

PayPal comes with the biggest number of features, which is why it’s often the most popular choice, especially among companies. A standout feature is the ability to send money to multiple recipients at the same time. Other features include:

Do not forsake your mobile payment

Mobile payment has become huge, and it’s just a matter of time before we can’t even remember how it was to live without it. Adapting the new technology now, and doing it properly, means you’re securing yourself a brighter future. But it is essential to do it right – otherwise things can get real ugly – real fast. Carefully choose if you’d go for a pre-built platform, or your own.
Consider the elements above – trust, user experience and security. There are many SDKs out there that promise an ‘effortless’ and ‘seamless’ implementation process, but it can be challenging to “manage the entire process within the context of the app without making it complex, or buggy,” as TechBeacon’s Erik Sherman puts it.
submitted by MobileWiz247 to gamedev [link] [comments]

[Table] IAmA: I am Mikko Hypponen, a computer security expert. Ask me anything!

Verified? (This bot cannot verify AMAs just yet)
Date: 2014-12-02
Link to submission (Has self-text)
Questions Answers
Do you still do malware analysis as a part of your day job ? Do you have some advices for someone searching a job in the field ? You need to pick your focus area. What do you want to do? Penetration testing? Encryption? Malware analysis? Forensics? Underground intelligence? Counter-espionage? Then you need to find mentors and coaches. The easiest way to do this is via online forums dedicated to your focus area. For example, check forum.infosecmentors.com.
SANS has some great online resources for people starting up in this area: check them out.
Do you see malware analysis as a growth field for careers? Why? Good malware analysts will always get a job. And malware isn't going to go away any time soon.
It's not just security companies who are hiring people in this field. Many large companies and telcos have their own CERT teams which hire malware analysts.
Is it true that it isn't a huge challenge to modify malware in a way that it is not detected by any current anti virus program, so that people building bot nets or infiltrating computers with Trojans usually smuggle them past virus scanners? It's trivial to modify existing malware so that traditional antivirus programs won't detect it any more. It only takes couple of minutes.
That's why antivirus programs have been moving towards behaviour-based detection models as well as towards reputation-based detection models.
Do note that testing behaviour-based blocking is hard. That's why it's misleading when people post links to sites such as Virustotal as evidence that particular file is 'not detected by AVs'. There's no way to know if a particular antivirus would have blocked the file, unless you would try to run it.
"As far as we can see, this program has never been executed by anyone else anywhere. You are the first person on the planet to run this file. This is highly unusual. We will block this file, even though we can't find any known malware from the file"
The only problem with this scenario are software developers, who compile their own programs. They obviously are the first persons on the planet to run a particular program - as they made it themselves! They can easily whitelist their output folder to avoid this problem though.
Can you recommend any behaviour-based or reputation-based blocking software in particular (for Windows and/or OS X)? Well, our own antivirus has these built in.
Europol's cybercrime taskforce recently took down over a hundred darknet servers. Did the news shake your faith in TOR? People use Tor for surfing the normal web anonymized, and they use Tor Hidden Service for running websites that are only accessible for Tor users.
Both Tor use cases can be targeted by various kinds of attacks. Just like anywhere else, there is no absolute security in Tor either.
I guess the takedown showed more about capabilities of current law enforcement than anything else.
I use Tor regularily to gain access to sites in the Tor Hidden Service, but for proteting my own privacy, I don't rely on Tor. I use VPNs instead. In addition to providing you an exit node from another location, VPNs also encrypt your traffic. However, Tor is free and it's open source. Most VPNs are closed source, and you have to pay for them. And you have to rely on the VPN provider, so choose carefully. We have a VPN product of our own, which is what I use.
I use a VPN regularly from work to bypass filters, and at home to avoid those pesky cease-and-desists. Although I'm not a infosec professional I've always heard that how secure you are using a VPN is directly related to whether or not their logs of your traffic can be traced back to you. How secure in your opinion are VPN providers (such as PIA which I personally use)? And in wake of the prevalence of government surveillance now can VPN providers claims of 'not keeping logs' be trusted to protect privacy? Use a VPN provider you trust. Someone who's been in the security business for a long while. Also, aim for a vendor who doesn't store logs of user activity.
Do you keep logs on the VPN? Freedome stores no logs.
How safe are current smart phones and how secure are their connections? Are special phones used by politicians really safe, or do they get hacked as well? The operating systems on our current phones (and tablets) are clearly more secure than the operating systems on our computers. That's mostly because they are much more restricted.
Windows Phones and iOS devices don't have a real malware problem (they still have to worry about things like phishing though). Android is the only smartphone platform that has real-world malware for it (but most of that is found in China and is coming from 3rd party app stores).
It is interesting the Android is the first Linux distribution to have a real-world malware problem.
Lot's of people are afraid of the viruses and malware only simply because they are all over the news and realtively easy to explain to. I am personally more afraid of the silently allowed data mining (i.e. the amount of info Google can get their hands on) and social engineering style of "hacking". Companies like Google and Facebook make money by trying to gather as much information about you as they can. But Google and Facebook are not criminals and they are not breaking the law.
How would you compare these two different threats and their threat levels on Average Joes point of view - which of them is more likely to cause some harm. Or is there something else to be more afraid of even more (govermental level hacks/attacks)? There are different problems: problems with security and problems with privacy. Security problems come from criminals who do break the law and who directly try to steal from you with attacks like banking trojans or credit card keyloggers. Blanket surveillance of the internet also affects us all. But comparing these threats to each other is hard.
Thoughts on bitcoin from a security standpoint? Bitcoin is interesting, in many different ways.
I do believe in cryptocurrencies. It might not be Bitcoin that changes the world, but something built on that will.
We see Bitcoin in our line of work all the time. Wallet theft. Ransomware where Bitcoin are used to pay the ransoms. Mining trojans.
However, that's just like blaming cash for being too handy for drug dealers.
Bitcoin is just a tool. Can be used for good or bad.
Favorite debugging tool? I've always had a soft spot for the old DEBUG.EXE that shipped with MS-DOS...
N Yeah.com.
E0100 B0 13 CD 10 68 00 A0 07 31 FF B1 C8 E8 20 00 51.
E0110 B9 40 01 E8 19 00 D8 C3 DF 1C D8 E3 8A 04 DF 1C.
E0120 32 04 24 1F AA E2 EC 59 E2 E2 83 07 10 EB D9 89.
E0130 0C DF 04 D9 C0 DE 07 DE 74 04 D9 FE DE 4C 14 C3.
RCX.
40.
W.
Q
Is this real? Link to www.youtube.com. No, that's not how you break into a system in the real world.
Another timely rebuttal of movie hacking, speaking about the ads for the upcoming Black Hat movie: Link to carbon-dynamics.squarespace.com - this one is written by Dan Tentler.
With the rise of the Internet of Things, what measures can we take to better secure ourselves in regards to home devices (laptops, smart-tvs, etc)? Well, you won't be running an antivirus on your washing machine or toaster, that's for sure.
The real-world attacks against IoT devices are still limited - mostly because the ways of making money by hacking washing machines and so are limited.
As a result, the IoT security solutions aren't really widely available yet. They will be in the future though.
Is it unethical to release viruses that kill viruses? Or would it be hard to tell the good buys from the bad guys (eventually)? The idea of a 'good virus' has been discussed to death already years ago. The consensus is that anything good that could be done with self-replicating code could be done better without the replication.
See Dr. Vesselin Bontchev's seminal paper on this: Link to www.virusbtn.com
I have a dream. Link to i.imgur.com Nice pic...
Linux distributions generally don't need antivirus, but apart from the fact that most malware is written for Windows, why do you think this is? If linux became the popular choice on desktops, do you think it would be as prone to malware as Windows is? How about OS X? Most mobile malware IS written for Linux, since most smartphones run Linux.
So first and foremost, it's a question of market shares.
After that it's a question of attacker skillsets. If the attackers have been writing Windows malware since Windows XP, they aren't likely to stop and switch easily to OS X or Linux unless they have to. And they don't have to.
What's your take on security researchers withholding their findings regarding state sponsored malware for 'global security concerns'? Kaspersky and Symantec both withheld information about Reign malware. Is this common? Is it ethical? Why are security companies beholden to the intelligence community and not the people who pay them for their services and advice? How can this conflict of interest be resolved while retaining independence and integrity? Nobody was withholding detection. Everybody detected all Regin-related files they had, and protected the end users. Which one would you rather have us to do? Sign an NDA, get the samples and protect our users? Or not sign the NDA and not protect our users.
Many people I talk to about this privacy thingy say "I have nothing to hide, so why bother". Do you think this will ever change, that people would start caring about this? Have you already seen the general opinion sifting...? Some people will always say this. But they are always the people who haven't really thought it through.
If you have nothing to hide, you can't keep a secret. If you have nothing to hide, show me your search history. If you have nothing to hide, give me your password. If you have nothing to hide, I can't trust you.
At this point, what do you personally feel about security and mass surveillance in a post-Snowden world where still not much has changed? I've learned that many, many people just don't care. Which is depressing.
If you don't care about mass surveillance for your own case, how about caring on behalf of the future generations?
Last updated: 2014-12-06 14:37 UTC
This post was generated by a robot! Send all complaints to epsy.
submitted by tabledresser to tabled [link] [comments]

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Hacking Bitcoin network It is nearly impossible to hack the Bitcoin network and steal Bitcoins. You will need to find the private key for a particular public address. The possibilities are limitless. Still a group is working on a project to crowd While 4,700 bitcoins is a lot, the number pales in comparison to the 850,000 bitcoins lost by Japan-based bitcoin exchange Mt. Gox potentially to hackers in February 2014. – Rappler.com *1 BTC Digital money that’s instant, private, and free from bank fees. Download our official wallet app and start using Bitcoin today. Read news, start mining, and buy BTC or BCH. "Bitcoin is a technological tour de force" -- Bill Gates. I'm surprised that so many people at the end of 2013 still seem to not understand what Bitcoin is. Oh well, at least I see things changing. If Bitcoin is a scam, then the US dollar is a far greater scam. As long as there is internet access, bitcoin can do what gold does 10 times better. The monumental 2016 hack resulted in one of the single-largest losses in bitcoin of all time. Post Views: 11

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