Bitcoin Hard Forks - List Wiki

Bitcoin Danmark

Danske bitcoin nyheder, erfaringer, stil et spørgsmål mm.
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Primecoin

Primecoin is an innovative cryptocurrency, a form of digital currency secured by cryptography and issued through a decentralized mining market. Derived from Satoshi Nakamoto's Bitcoin, Primecoin introduces an unique form of proof-of-work based on searching for prime numbers.
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Cryptocurrency News & Discussion

The official source for CryptoCurrency News, Discussion & Analysis.
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US Senators introduce bill to FORCE all device and software providers in the US to build backdoors into their products. Bill would make encryption ILLEGAL unless it had a backdoor for the US government.

This is the best tl;dr I could make, original reduced by 77%. (I'm a bot)
US lawmakers have introduced the Lawful Access to Encrypted Data Act to ensure law enforcement can access encrypted information.
The committee noted that the bill "Promotes technical and lawful access training and provides real-time assistance" and "Directs the Attorney General to create a prize competition to award participants who create a lawful access solution in an encrypted environment, while maximizing privacy and security."
The Lawful Access to Encrypted Data Act "Is actually even more out of touch with reality than many other recent anti-encryption bills," said Andrew Crocker, a senior staff attorney on the civil liberties team of the Electronic Frontier Foundation.
The policy analyst noted: "The idea that an exceptional access backdoor can safely be developed solely for government use has been debunked over and over again by experts, including former senior members of the U.S. Justice Department." The Lawful Access to Encrypted Data bill can be found here.
What do you think about the Lawful Access to Encrypted Data Act? Let us know in the comments section below.
Tags in this story Backdoor, backdoor mandate, earn it, encryption, encryption illegal, Lawful Access to Encrypted Data Act, us billImage Credits: Shutterstock, Pixabay, Wiki Commons.
Summary Source | FAQ | Feedback | Top keywords: bill#1 Access#2 Encrypted#3 encryption#4 backdoor#5
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NOTICE: This thread is for discussing the submission topic. Please do not discuss the concept of the autotldr bot here.
submitted by autotldr to autotldr [link] [comments]

PSA, to get the full benefits of a hardware wallet, connect it to ur own full node. Only then is ur financial sovereignty complete.

"When you use the hardware wallet it is connecting to the ledgetrezor servers and telling you what you have in those addresses. You can’t actually verify what they are telling you is the truth. If you run your own node and connect that node to your wallets, you can verify the truth."
But that is not the only reason. The fact that only economic full nodes can help enforce concensus is perhaps just as important:
"Running a full node is kind of like voting where the weight of your vote is the amount of money you transact through that full node (sort of)."
In other words, when ur full node is not connected to ur actual BTC stash, u are giving up ur leverage to enforce consensus on the bitcoin network. Many don't realize that running a full node with an empty wallet does nothing for the network. It is completely redundant.
That happens a lot these days because bitcoin core's compatibility with hardware wallets is minimal. U need to run code to connect it, and even then it is cluncky, there isn't even a GUI. It also happens because folks don't know about the importance of economic nodes.
Here it is from the wiki:
As explained previously, full nodes enforce the consensus rules no matter what. However, lightweight nodes do not do this. Lightweight nodes do whatever the majority of mining power says. Therefore, if most of the miners got together to increase their block reward, for example, lightweight nodes would blindly go along with it. If this ever happened, the network would split such that lightweight nodes and full nodes would end up on separate networks, using separate currencies. People using lightweight nodes would be unable to transact with people using full nodes. If all businesses and many users are using full nodes, then this network split is not a critical problem because users of lightweight clients will quickly notice that they can't send or receive bitcoins to/from most of the people who they usually do business with, and so they'll stop using Bitcoin until the evil miners are overcome, which is the appropriate response. However, if almost everyone on the network is using lightweight nodes in this situation, then everyone would continue being able to transact with each other, and so Bitcoin could very well end up "hijacked" by evil miners.
https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Full_node#Economic_strength
submitted by ting_jun48 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

The Best Cryptocurrency Mining Pools in 2020

This review is not sponsored! Neither it is an ad.
How to choose a mining pool? How to avoid stale shares? The pros and cons of different services.

What is a cryptocurrency mining pool?

A “mining pool" is a server that distributes the task of calculating the block signature between all connected participants. The contribution of each of them is evaluated using the so-called “shares”, which are potential candidates for receiving a signature. As soon as one of the “shares” hits the target, the pool announces the readiness of the block and distributes the reward.
However, if you participate in the pool, then you will have to share the profit with all the participants in the pool, but for the majority, this usually is the most profitable option.

Which pool is better for mining?

The best mining pools should meet the following criteria:

Key selection criteria

To select a good pool for each specific cryptocurrency, you need to carefully study all the information available about it on its website and on the forums.
To reduce the number of stale shares, it is better to mine on the pool closest to the miner. You can choose the fastest mining pool by studying the information about the processing speed of the share in the mining program or by pinging the time it takes for the signal to pass from the miner's computer to the servers of the pool.

10 most popular and powerful pools: Description

ViaBTC

Coins: BTC, BCH, BSV, LTC, ETH, ETC, ZEC, DASH, XMR, CKB
Commission: 3%, lifetime discount: 1%

EMCD

Coins: BTC, BSV, BCH, LTC, ETC, ETH, DASH
Commission: 0%. There is a donation option: 0.5% of the income

Ethermine

Coins: ETH, ETC, ZEC
Commission: 1%

F2pool

Coins: BTC, LTC, and many other coins
Commission: 3-5%

NanoPool

Coins: XMR, ETH, ETC, SiaCoin, ZEC, PASC, ETN
Commission:1%

Mining Pool Hub

Coins: BTC, BSV, BCH, LTC
Commission: 0.9%

NiceHash

Coins: BTC, ETH, XRP, BCH, LTC, ZEC, DASH, XLM, EOS, USDT, LINK, BAT, ZRX, HOT, OMG, REP, BTG, NEXO, MATIC, ENJ, SNT, ELF, BNT, KNC, POLY, MTL + 20 more.
Commission: 2-5%

Coinotron

Coins: ETH, ETC, PASC, LTC, Zcash, BTG, DASH, FTC, VTC
Commission: 1-1.5%

Monero Mining Pool

Coins: XMR
Commission: 2%

Baikalmine

Coins: ETH, ETC, MOAC, CLO
Commission: 0.5-1%

Independent Pool Statistics

To make sure that the pools work and really exist, check independent sources. These are:
Keep up with the news of the crypto world at CoinJoy.io Follow us on Twitter and Medium. Subscribe to our YouTube channel. Join our Telegram channel. For any inquiries mail us at [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]).
submitted by CoinjoyAssistant to dogemining [link] [comments]

The Best Cryptocurrency Mining Pools in 2020

This review is not sponsored! Neither it is an ad.
How to choose a mining pool? How to avoid stale shares? The pros and cons of different services.

What is a cryptocurrency mining pool?

A “mining pool" is a server that distributes the task of calculating the block signature between all connected participants. The contribution of each of them is evaluated using the so-called “shares”, which are potential candidates for receiving a signature. As soon as one of the “shares” hits the target, the pool announces the readiness of the block and distributes the reward.
However, if you participate in the pool, then you will have to share the profit with all the participants in the pool, but for the majority, this usually is the most profitable option.

Which pool is better for mining?

The best mining pools should meet the following criteria:

Key selection criteria

To select a good pool for each specific cryptocurrency, you need to carefully study all the information available about it on its website and on the forums.
To reduce the number of stale shares, it is better to mine on the pool closest to the miner. You can choose the fastest mining pool by studying the information about the processing speed of the share in the mining program or by pinging the time it takes for the signal to pass from the miner's computer to the servers of the pool.

10 most popular and powerful pools: Description

ViaBTC

Coins: BTC, BCH, BSV, LTC, ETH, ETC, ZEC, DASH, XMR, CKB
Commission: 3%, lifetime discount: 1%

EMCD

Coins: BTC, BSV, BCH, LTC, ETC, ETH, DASH
Commission: 0%. There is a donation option: 0.5% of the income

Ethermine

Coins: ETH, ETC, ZEC
Commission: 1%

F2pool

Coins: BTC, LTC, and many other coins
Commission: 3-5%

NanoPool

Coins: XMR, ETH, ETC, SiaCoin, ZEC, PASC, ETN
Commission:1%

Mining Pool Hub

Coins: BTC, BSV, BCH, LTC
Commission: 0.9%

NiceHash

Coins: BTC, ETH, XRP, BCH, LTC, ZEC, DASH, XLM, EOS, USDT, LINK, BAT, ZRX, HOT, OMG, REP, BTG, NEXO, MATIC, ENJ, SNT, ELF, BNT, KNC, POLY, MTL + 20 more.
Commission: 2-5%

Coinotron

Coins: ETH, ETC, PASC, LTC, Zcash, BTG, DASH, FTC, VTC
Commission: 1-1.5%

Monero Mining Pool

Coins: XMR
Commission: 2%

Baikalmine

Coins: ETH, ETC, MOAC, CLO
Commission: 0.5-1%

Independent Pool Statistics

To make sure that the pools work and really exist, check independent sources. These are:
Keep up with the news of the crypto world at CoinJoy.io Follow us on Twitter and Medium. Subscribe to our YouTube channel. Join our Telegram channel. For any inquiries mail us at [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]).
submitted by CoinjoyAssistant to MiningPoolHub [link] [comments]

Mining and Dogecoin - Some FAQs

Hey shibes,
I see a lot of posts about mining lately and questions about the core wallet and how to mine with it, so here are some facts!
Feel free to add information to that thread or correct me if I did any mistake.

You downloaded the core wallet

Great! After a decade it probably synced and now you are wondering how to get coins? Bad news: You don't get coins by running your wallet, even running it as a full node. Check what a full node is here.
Maybe you thought so, because you saw a very old screenshot of a wallet, like this (Version 1.2). This version had a "Dig" tab where you can enter your mining configuration. The current version doesn't have this anymore, probably because it doesn't make sense anymore.

You downloaded a GPU/CPU miner

Nice! You did it, even your antivirus system probably went postal and you started covering all your webcams... But here is the bad news again: Since people are using ASIC miners, you just can't compete with your CPU hardware anymore. Even with your more advanced GPU you will have a hard time. The hashrate is too high for a desktop PC to compete with them. The blocks should be mined every 1 minute (or so) and that's causing the difficulty to go up - and we are out... So definitly check what is your hashrate while you are mining, you would need about 1.5 MH/s to make 1 Doge in 24 hours!

Mining Doge

Let us start with a quote:
"Dogecoin Core 1.8 introduces AuxPoW from block 371,337. AuxPoW is a technology which enables miners to submit work done while mining other coins, as work on the Dogecoin block chain."
- langerhans
What does this mean? You could waste your hashrate only on the Dogecoin chain, probably find never a block, but when, you only receive about 10.000 Dogecoins, currently worth about $25. Or you could apply your hashrate to LTC and Doge (and probably even more) at the same time. Your change of solving the block (finding the nonce) is your hashrate divided by the hashrat in sum - and this is about the same for Doge and LTC. This means you will always want to submit your work to all chains available!

Mining solo versus pool

So let's face it - mining solo won't get you anywhere, so let's mine on a pool! If you have a really bad Hashrate, please consider that: Often you need about $1 or $2 worth of crypto to receive a payout (without fees). This means, you have to get there. With 100 MH/s on prohashing, it takes about 6 days, running 24/7 to get to that threshold. Now you can do the math... 1 MH/s = 1000 KH/s, if you are below 1 MH/s, you probably won't have fun.

Buying an ASIC

You found an old BTC USB-miner with 24 GH/s (1 GH/s = 1000 MH/s) for $80 bucks - next stop lambo!? Sorry, bad news again, this hashrate is for SHA-256! If you want to mine LTC/Doge you will need a miner using scrypt with quite lower numbers on the hashrate per second, so don't fall for that. Often when you have a big miner (= also loud), you get more Hashrate per $ spent on the miner, but most will still run on a operational loss, because the electricity is too expensive and the miners will be outdated soon again. Leading me to my next point...

Making profit

You won't make money running your miner. Just do the math: What if you would have bougth a miner 1 year ago? Substract costs for electricity and then compare to: What if you just have bought coins. In most cases you would have a greater profit by just buying coins, maybe even with a "stable" coin like Doges.

Cloud Mining

Okay, this was a lot of text and you are still on the hook? Maybe you are desperated enough to invest in some cloud mining contract... But this isn't a good idea either, because most of such contracts are scams based on a ponzi scheme. You often can spot them easy, because they guarantee way to high profits, or they fake payouts that never happened, etc.
Just a thought: If someone in a subway says to you: Give me $1 and lets meet in one year, right here and I give you $54,211,841, you wouldn't trust him and if some mining contract says they will give you 5% a day it is basically the same.
Also rember the merged mining part. Nobody would offer you to mine Doges, they would offer you to buy a hashrate for scrypt that will apply on multiple chains.

Alternative coins

Maybe try to mine a coin where you don't have ASICs yet, like Monero and exchange them to Doge. If somebody already tried this - feel free to add your thoughts!

Folding at Home (Doge)

Some people say folding at home (FAH - https://www.dogecoinfah.com/) still the best. I just installed the tool and it says I would make 69.852 points a day, running on medium power what equates to 8 Doges. It is easy, it was fun, but it isn't much.
Thanks for reading
_nformant
submitted by _nformant to dogecoin [link] [comments]

Why has Bitcoin fallen so short of its promises?

I was looking at web archives, and Bitcoin Talk forums, and when I looked at the discussion on these forums, apparently Satoshi Nakamoto claimed that Bitcoin is actually very much capable of surpassing VISA's transactions per second cap, with hardware back in 2010. Not to mention, in the old wiki, it stated that Bitcoin very easily has the potential to scale to 8,000+ transactions per second. I was just wondering why no cryptocurrency (and even though BCH is far better than BTC) has been able to reach these goals, despite our significant improvements in technology.
submitted by 1MightBeAPenguin to btc [link] [comments]

What Is Bitcoin? What is bitcoin Mining?

Bitcoin Overview
Bitcoin is digital-currency, It is known as the cryptocurrency. Bitcoin is a widely used cryptocurrency. It is one of the most secure cryptocurrencies in the world. It doesn't govern by a central bank or any government. Here you don't need to pay high transaction fees while you are making a transaction over the bitcoin network. Here your privacy is also hidden. So no one knows who transferring fund to whom. This is the main reason why people start taking an interest in bitcoin. From the researcher, It is the future of the digital currency.
What Is Bitcoin Mining? Why It Is Important?
Bitcoin mining is the process done by miners from the world. Miners can participate in mining to secure the whole bitcoin network. Miners confirm the transaction over a bitcoin network called blockchain and regularly update to the bitcoin ledger called a blockchain. This process is done by powerful bitcoin mining hardware such as GPUs, AICS' chips, Mining Rigs, etc. Mining hardware help to solve a complex mathematical problem. If miners successfully solve the problem then they rewarded with newly generated bitcoins. The current reward is 12.5 BTC + Transaction fees.
What Is Bitcoin Cloud Mining? List Of Best Free Cloud Mining Website
If you don't want to invest in costly mining hardware then here is the solution. You can participate in the bitcoin mining cloud. Here mining hardware is maintained by mining companies. You just need to purchase hardware on lease or hashing power on rent. Then you participate in bitcoin mining using mining hardware & mining software. Rest of the things done by mining companies.
If you are interested in bitcoin mining? I highly recommended to join Global Mining, It is one of the best bitcoin mining service provider. The regularly maintain hardware and also get 24/7 support from their efficient support team. This is one of the best free cloud mining company which provides everything in a transparent way. You bitcoin is 100% secure and it is a trustworthy bitcoin mining company.
You can find more info about bitcoin or bitcoin mining from here Wikipedia, Bitcoin.it, Bitcoinwiki.org
submitted by anneandersn8 to u/anneandersn8 [link] [comments]

You can call you a Bitcoiner if you know/can explain these terms...

03/Jan/2009
10 Minutes
10,000 BTC Pizza
2016 Blocks
21 Million
210,000 Blocks
51% Attack
Address
Altcoin
Antonopoulos
Asic
Asic Boost
Base58
Batching
Bech32
Bit
Bitcoin Cash
Bitcoin Improvement Proposal (BIP)
Bitcoin SV
Bitmain
Block
Block height
Block reward
Blockchain
Blockexplorer
Bloom Filter
Brain Wallet
Buidl
Change Address
Child pays for parent (CPFP)
Coinbase (not the exchange)
CoinJoin
Coinmarketcap (CMC)
Colored Coin
Confirmation
Consensus
Custodial Wallet
Craig Wright
David Kleinman
Difficulty
Difficulty adjustment
Difficulty Target
Dogecoin
Dorian Nakamoto
Double spend
Elliptic Curve Digital Signature Algorithm (ECDSA)
Ethereum
Faketoshi
Fork
Full Node
Gavin Andresen
Genesis Block
Getting goxed
Halving
Hard Fork
Hardware Wallet
Hash
Hashing
Hierarchical Deterministic (HD) Wallet
Hodl
Hot Wallet
Initial Coin Offering (ICO)
Initial Exchange Offering (IEO)
Ledger
Light Node
Lightning
Litecoin
Locktime
Mainnet
Malleability
Master Private Key
Master Public Key
Master Seed
mBTC
Mempool
Merkle Tree
Mining
Mining Farm
Mining Pool
Mixing
MtGox
Multisig
Nonce
Not your keys,...
Opcode
Orphan block
P2PKH
P2SH
Paper Wallet
Peers
Pieter Wuille
Premining
Private key
Proof of Stake (PoS)
Proof of Work (PoW)
Pruning
Public key
Pump'n'Dump
Replace by Fee (RBF)
Ripemd160
Roger Ver
sat
Satoshi Nakamoto
Schnorr Signatures
Script
Segregated Witness (Segwit)
Sha256
Shitcoin
Sidechain
Signature
Signing
Simplified Payment Verification (SPV)
Smart Contract
Soft Fork
Stratum
Syncing
Testnet
Transaction
Transaction Fees
TransactionId (Txid)
Trezor
User Activated Soft Fork (UASF)
Utxo
Wallet Import Format (WIF)
Watch-Only Address
Whitepaper
List obviously not complete. Suggestions appreciated.
Refs:
https://bitcoin.org/en/developer-glossary https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Main_Page https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCgo7FCCPuylVk4luP3JAgVw https://www.youtube.com/useaantonop
submitted by PolaT1x to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Subreddit Stats: CryptoTechnology top posts from 2017-12-23 to 2020-01-20 15:51 PDT

Period: 758.36 days
Submissions Comments
Total 956 13660
Rate (per day) 1.26 18.01
Unique Redditors 584 3144
Combined Score 21553 44566

Top Submitters' Top Submissions

  1. 1166 points, 43 submissions: Neophyte-
    1. "Do you need a Blockchain?" - this paper is fantastic, everyone should read this before evaluating a coin and if requires a block chain to solve a solution the coin is promising to solve. (136 points, 41 comments)
    2. Do any of you foresee a crypto being widely adopted as a general purpose payment coin? nano, btc, btccash etc (take your pick). I think it won't happen for reasons in this post. What do you think? (59 points, 54 comments)
    3. Noticed the huge rise of EOS lately what does it have over NEO and ethereum and to a lesser extent Cardano? I tried researching it, but wasn't sold. (54 points, 55 comments)
    4. Hard Problems in Cryptocurrency: Five Years Later ~Vitalik (46 points, 1 comment)
    5. I had a Q&A with Bruno head architect / CEO of oyster, thought you guys might like it. (45 points, 2 comments)
    6. A good article that explains in simple terms how Eth2 works, how it will be rolled out and migrated from eth1 (42 points, 4 comments)
    7. DAI the stablecoin can now be transferred GAS free (article explaining how it works via new MCD DAI contract). This holds alot of promise for the so called "Web3" (40 points, 8 comments)
    8. Veriblock is consuming 27% of bitcoins block space - what does this mean for bitcoins future? (39 points, 16 comments)
    9. Vitalik: Alternative proposal for early eth1 <-> eth2 merge (38 points, 3 comments)
    10. Is launching a PoW permissionless blockchain still possible today? or would it be too susceptible to a 51% attack? (37 points, 37 comments)
  2. 578 points, 16 submissions: crypto_ha
    1. Why is Ripple considered a cryptocurrency (by many)? (109 points, 63 comments)
    2. So reportedly there are serious vulnerabilities found in EOS’ code. And it seems like those are more than just random software bugs. (97 points, 29 comments)
    3. Guide: How to get started with Blockchain development? (60 points, 6 comments)
    4. A newly found vulnerability in Nano's Android wallet (44 points, 12 comments)
    5. The history and state of Ethereum's Casper research - Vitalik Buterin (39 points, 4 comments)
    6. What is the difference between Sidechain vs Child Chain vs Off Chain? (39 points, 12 comments)
    7. EOS mainnet is official live (finally), but... (36 points, 24 comments)
    8. Bitcoin's "doomsday" economics - Bank of International Settlements (34 points, 23 comments)
    9. How Wall Street’s embrace could undermine Bitcoin (30 points, 9 comments)
    10. Ethereum ERC 1497: DApp Dispute Evidence Standard (24 points, 0 comments)
  3. 513 points, 20 submissions: ndha1995
    1. Ethereum Classic is currently being 51% attacked (103 points, 31 comments)
    2. Why are there so many garbage posts the past 24 hours? (58 points, 10 comments)
    3. Google Unveils 72-Qubit Quantum Processor With Low Error Rates (48 points, 24 comments)
    4. IOTA's Network-Bound PoW consensus, is it feasible? (42 points, 13 comments)
    5. The Challenges of Investigating Cryptocurrencies and Blockchain Related Crime (29 points, 7 comments)
    6. Deep dive into zk-STARKs with Vitalik Buterin's blog posts (26 points, 3 comments)
    7. Tether discussion thread (26 points, 21 comments)
    8. Vitalik Buterin Proposes a Consensus Algorithm That Requires Only 1% to Be Honest (24 points, 8 comments)
    9. Can somebody compare Qtum vs. NEO, technology-wise? (E.g. PoS vs. PoW; smart contract protocols...) (21 points, 15 comments)
    10. Introduction to Non Fungible Tokens (NFTs) (21 points, 9 comments)
  4. 377 points, 16 submissions: turtleflax
    1. Around 13% of DASH's privateSends are traceable to their origin (69 points, 3 comments)
    2. "Big Bang" attack could leverage Monero's dynamic blocksize to bloat the blockchain to 30TB in only 36 hours (52 points, 3 comments)
    3. The case for the obsolescence of Proof of Work and why 2018 will be the year of Proof of Stake (41 points, 29 comments)
    4. Monero vs PIVX: The First Scheduled Privacy Coin Debate Thread on /CryptoCurrency (38 points, 12 comments)
    5. Introducing the Privacy Coin Matrix, a cross-team collaboration comparing 20 privacy coins in 100 categories (26 points, 25 comments)
    6. Do permissioned blockchains have any merits? (25 points, 23 comments)
    7. The State of Hashing Algorithms — The Why, The How, and The Future (21 points, 4 comments)
    8. How Zerocoin Works in 5 Minutes (19 points, 5 comments)
    9. Errors made by Satoshi (17 points, 8 comments)
    10. How Much Privacy is Enough? Threats, Scaling, and Trade-offs in Blockchain Privacy Protocols - Ian Miers (Cornell Tech, Zerocoin, Zerocash) (17 points, 4 comments)
  5. 321 points, 6 submissions: Qwahzi
    1. Technical comparison of LIGHTNING vs TANGLE vs HASHGRAPH vs NANO (133 points, 37 comments)
    2. Addressing Nano's weaknesses (bandwidth usage and disk IO). Nano voting traffic to be reduced by 99.9% by implementing vote by hash, lazy bootstrapping, and reduced vote rebroadcasting (x-post CryptoCurrency) (78 points, 8 comments)
    3. Emergent centralization due to economies of scale (PoW vs DPoS) – Colin LeMahieu (52 points, 37 comments)
    4. Nano community member developing a distributed "mining" service to pay people to do PoW for third-parties (e.g. exchanges, light wallet services, etc) (32 points, 20 comments)
    5. What do you think about OpenCAP, the cryptocurrency alias protocol that mirrors traditional email addresses? (15 points, 12 comments)
    6. Bitcoin would be a calamity, not an economy (11 points, 52 comments)
  6. 256 points, 4 submissions: rockyrainy
    1. Bitcoin Gold hit by Double Spend Attack (51% attack). The Attacker reversed 22 blocks. (179 points, 102 comments)
    2. ZK-starks white paper published (44 points, 16 comments)
    3. [Q] How does a network reach consensus on what time it is? (21 points, 17 comments)
    4. Stateless (no history) Cryptocurrency via snapshots? (12 points, 7 comments)
  7. 244 points, 3 submissions: HSPremier
    1. From a technical standpoint: Why does every blockchain projects need their own coins? (181 points, 50 comments)
    2. What is Reddit's obsession with REQ? (61 points, 43 comments)
    3. What is the technological difference between a privacy coin and a privacy coin platform? Won't a privacy coin platform be more superior than a privacy coin? (2 points, 3 comments)
  8. 234 points, 2 submissions: Realness100
    1. A Guided Reading of Bitcoin’s Original White Paper (202 points, 10 comments)
    2. A Guided Reading of Ethereum's Original White Paper! (32 points, 5 comments)
  9. 185 points, 4 submissions: tracyspacygo
    1. My brief observation of most common Consensus Algorithms (159 points, 49 comments)
    2. What are the main Trends/Challenges for Bitcoin and whole crytpocurrencies industry? (12 points, 33 comments)
    3. Guideline for Newbies: Trying out Bitcoin transactions with TESTNET (7 points, 1 comment)
    4. Most advanced Cryptocurrencies Comparison Table (7 points, 8 comments)
  10. 177 points, 9 submissions: benmdi
    1. What's the best argument against cryptotechnology? I.e. Steelman the cryptocurrency skeptic (43 points, 42 comments)
    2. Would there be interest from this community in crypto resources aimed at developers? If so, what topics? (29 points, 14 comments)
    3. Has the window for bootstrapping a new PoW coin closed? (24 points, 57 comments)
    4. What can we, as a community, learn from the rise & acquisition of GitHub (23 points, 8 comments)
    5. 🍱 Rollup Roundup: Understanding Ethereum's Emerging Layer 2 (19 points, 1 comment)
    6. Video Tutorial: Introducing An Experience Dev To Smart Contract Coding (17 points, 3 comments)
    7. Do we need a blockchain to be decentralized? What questions would you ask a self described fan of decentralization, but blockchain skeptic? (11 points, 19 comments)
    8. ETH Block Rewards And Second Order Effects On Hardware Availability (7 points, 8 comments)
    9. Which Of The Big Tech Companies Is Most Likely To Bring Crypto Mainstream? Here's Why I Think It's Apple (4 points, 7 comments)
  11. 175 points, 9 submissions: galan77
    1. Is the Lightning Network a massive threat to the blockchain? (49 points, 66 comments)
    2. TPS of Lightning Network vs. Sharding, which one does better? (28 points, 7 comments)
    3. Are there any major downsides to sharding? (21 points, 33 comments)
    4. What's the difference between trustlessness and permissionlessness (19 points, 7 comments)
    5. Which consensus algorithm is the best, PoW, PoS, PoAuthority, PoAsset? (18 points, 57 comments)
    6. How can XRP reach 50,000 TPS when they have no sharding and every node has to validate every single transaction. (15 points, 14 comments)
    7. A few questions about the Lightning Network (14 points, 6 comments)
    8. Pascalcoin can do 72,000 tps apparently. Is this legit? The new Nano? (8 points, 39 comments)
    9. How does Ripple's (XRB's) consensus algorithm Proof of Correctness work, are there any downsides? (3 points, 23 comments)
  12. 175 points, 1 submission: ilielezi
    1. Why white papers in crypto world are so unprofessional? (175 points, 88 comments)
  13. 165 points, 6 submissions: CryptoMaximalist
    1. Facebook's Libra (48 points, 55 comments)
    2. “Fake Stake” attacks on some Proof-of-Stake cryptocurrencies responsibly disclosed by researchers from the Decentralized Systems Lab at UIUC (31 points, 9 comments)
    3. Quantum Computing and the Cryptography in Crypto (27 points, 14 comments)
    4. PING and REJECT attacks on ZCash (Patch available) | Stanford Applied Crypto Group (22 points, 1 comment)
    5. Introduction to Cryptography: Part 1 - Jinglan Wang (19 points, 1 comment)
    6. New site howmanyconfs.com shows the amount of time and confirmations of Proof of Work coins to match 6 confirmations on Bitcoin (18 points, 11 comments)
  14. 163 points, 10 submissions: GainsLean
    1. Videos For Developers Who Want To Learn Blockchain In A Practical Way (36 points, 17 comments)
    2. What Do You Want To Learn? (32 points, 20 comments)
    3. Get Involved With The Smart Contract Coding Challenge (25 points, 4 comments)
    4. Solution To $10K Art Prize (25 points, 3 comments)
    5. Blockchain Course Outline Has Been Released - Feedback warranted (22 points, 12 comments)
    6. Introduction To Distributed Systems And Consensus Protocols (9 points, 2 comments)
    7. Are there any closed source crypto wallets? (4 points, 19 comments)
    8. Are there any successful proof of identity projects? (4 points, 8 comments)
    9. SPV Wallets Vs API Wallets (4 points, 1 comment)
    10. 12 Popular Consensus Algorithms - Explained (2 points, 0 comments)
  15. 163 points, 7 submissions: QRCollector
    1. Part 5. I'm writing a series about blockchain tech and possible future security risks. This is the fifth part of the series talking about an advanced vulnerability of BTC. (43 points, 43 comments)
    2. I'm writing a series about blockchain tech and possible future security risks. This is the third part of the series introducing Quantum resistant blockchains. (36 points, 4 comments)
    3. Part 4B. I’m writing a series about blockchain tech and possible future security risks. This is the fourth part of the series explaining the special quality of going quantum resistant from genesis block. (25 points, 21 comments)
    4. Part 6. (Last part) I'm writing a series about blockchain tech and possible future security risks. Failing shortcuts in an attempt to accomplish Quantum Resistance (24 points, 38 comments)
    5. I'm writing a series about blockchain tech and possible future security risks. This is the first part of the series introducing the basic concept of blockchain and what makes it reliable. (23 points, 10 comments)
    6. I'm writing a series about blockchain tech and possible future security risks. This is the fourth part of the series explaining the special quality of going quantum resistant from genesis block. (7 points, 1 comment)
    7. Part 2. I'm writing a series about blockchain tech and possible future security risks. This is the second part of the series: An accessible description of hashing and signature schemes. (5 points, 0 comments)
  16. 162 points, 3 submissions: FashionistaGuru
    1. How do we change the culture around cryptocurrency? (118 points, 54 comments)
    2. Which cryptos have the best new user experience? (30 points, 34 comments)
    3. Why does Apple prevent many crypto apps from entering the App Store? (14 points, 8 comments)
  17. 157 points, 7 submissions: SamsungGalaxyPlayer
    1. Breaking Monero Episodes 1-3: Introduction, Ring Signatures, 0-Decoy and Chain Reactions (45 points, 1 comment)
    2. "No, dPoW Isn't a Perfect Solution" (35 points, 48 comments)
    3. Breaking Mimblewimble’s Privacy Model - Dragonfly Research (27 points, 10 comments)
    4. Breaking Monero (and Zcash) Episodes 7-9: Remote Nodes, Timing Attacks, Poisoned Outputs (EAE Attack) (21 points, 2 comments)
    5. "Attacker Collection of IP Metadata" (18 points, 10 comments)
    6. "Tracing Transactions Across Cryptocurrency Ledgers" Using Shapeshift and Changelly (6 points, 4 comments)
    7. Breaking Monero Episodes 4-6: Chain Splits (Key Image Attack), Input Selection Algorithm, Unusual Ringsize (5 points, 2 comments)
  18. 147 points, 1 submission: shunsaitakahashi
    1. Proof-of-Approval: Stake Based, 1 Block Finality & History Attack Defense (147 points, 4 comments)
  19. 146 points, 6 submissions: themoderndayhercules
    1. "The selfish mining fallacy" explained and debunked (60 points, 8 comments)
    2. A Discussion of Stable coins and Decentralized Oracles (35 points, 8 comments)
    3. A Selfish Mining Double Spending attack Simulator (25 points, 2 comments)
    4. Why reputation systems don't work (15 points, 12 comments)
    5. A better incentivization for Swarm (6 points, 0 comments)
    6. When Mises met Szabo - A Discussion of the value of Bitcoin (5 points, 16 comments)
  20. 143 points, 7 submissions: KomodoWorld
    1. Komodo Platform's core developer and founder jl777 has started his own blog on Medium. The blog is aimed for senior developers who want to learn about blockchain. (46 points, 15 comments)
    2. Delayed Proof of Work (dPoW) security explained (36 points, 46 comments)
    3. Proof-of-Gameplay (19 points, 3 comments)
    4. Good guide for getting started with the Custom Consensus tech for Komodo-based blockchains (17 points, 0 comments)
    5. Cross-chain migration of coins with Crypto Conditions - by smk762 (12 points, 0 comments)
    6. A step-by-step example of working with a Crypto Conditions based Oracle - by smk762 (10 points, 0 comments)
    7. Changing consensus rules on the fly with Crypto Conditions (3 points, 0 comments)
  21. 141 points, 8 submissions: Stormy1997
    1. What technical/business advantages does a private blockchain have over a SQL server? (49 points, 79 comments)
    2. Is sharding to scale bad? (24 points, 28 comments)
    3. How would one create a fiat gateway theoretically? (19 points, 19 comments)
    4. Looking for Stellar smart contract/side chain code examples (16 points, 1 comment)
    5. Question - Securing personal information on a centralized server with user-owned keys (13 points, 3 comments)
    6. How do blockchains/smart contracts communicate with oracles? (10 points, 4 comments)
    7. Bandwidth scaling for TPS (8 points, 2 comments)
    8. Best method to transmit detailed data between two parties via existing platforms (2 points, 1 comment)
  22. 141 points, 3 submissions: seventyfiver
    1. Why does Ethereum use Solidity while other ecosystems like NEO stick with popular ones like Java and C#? (94 points, 26 comments)
    2. Chainlink's initial Go implementation went live this morning. Has anyone reviewed the code and can comment on it's quality? (40 points, 3 comments)
    3. What are some great books on cryptoeconomics or blockchain technology? (7 points, 4 comments)
  23. 134 points, 6 submissions: johnny_milkshakes
    1. Sub dedicated to DAG based coins (42 points, 8 comments)
    2. Thoughts on this? (28 points, 38 comments)
    3. This is very interesting (24 points, 19 comments)
    4. Educational presentation by Clara Shikhelman (18 points, 0 comments)
    5. Ethics question. (12 points, 40 comments)
    6. How to scale on chain? (10 points, 30 comments)
  24. 127 points, 4 submissions: sukitrebek
    1. What are you currently obsessed with, and why? (58 points, 150 comments)
    2. Crypto-based social network without a cryptocurrency. (42 points, 23 comments)
    3. How does underlying architecture affect what kinds of applications are possible? (17 points, 3 comments)
    4. Holochain vs. Radix DLT (10 points, 11 comments)
  25. 126 points, 1 submission: RufusTheFirefly
    1. Everytime I try to investigate the technology behind Cardano(Ada), I come across the words "scientific" and "peer-reviewed" over and over but almost no actual details. Can someone fill how this coin actually works and where they are in development? (126 points, 49 comments)
  26. 112 points, 1 submission: rocksolid77
    1. Can we have a real debate about the Bitcoin scaling issue? (112 points, 89 comments)
  27. 110 points, 4 submissions: kelluk
    1. What one can learn from browsing 30 million Ethereum addresses (72 points, 21 comments)
    2. I wanted to categorize all coins/tokens, and this is my proposal (23 points, 33 comments)
    3. Should whitepapers be understood by ordinary people? (10 points, 41 comments)
    4. Querying the Ethereum blockchain: how to & what to? (5 points, 5 comments)
  28. 107 points, 1 submission: NewDietTrend
    1. Outside of currency and voting, blockchain is awful and shouldnt be used. Can anyone explain where blockchain is worth the cost? (107 points, 166 comments)
  29. 105 points, 1 submission: insette
    1. /CryptoTech PSA: there are broadly TWO TYPES of Decentralized Exchanges. Which type are you investing in? (105 points, 55 comments)
  30. 103 points, 3 submissions: dtheme
    1. How to accept crypto payments for digital downloads if you are a small business? Solutions, e-commerce sites are lacking (46 points, 38 comments)
    2. How many 24 letter seeds and "Bitcoin" keys can there be? (34 points, 24 comments)
    3. Is there any reason why the big tech companies are not getting into crypto? (23 points, 36 comments)
  31. 103 points, 3 submissions: dvnielng
    1. Why do so many of these businesses need a token? (Unsure) (61 points, 86 comments)
    2. DAPPS - Only coins that have intrinsic value? Ethereum , Neo? (31 points, 10 comments)
    3. How could blockchain work for expensive purchases/escrow? (11 points, 2 comments)
  32. 101 points, 1 submission: kickso
    1. Is NANO everything it says it is? (101 points, 96 comments)
  33. 98 points, 3 submissions: heart_mind_body
    1. How can we breathe some life into this sub? (56 points, 22 comments)
    2. Can anyone give an example for a technology that provides a "public permissioned blockchain"? (28 points, 16 comments)
    3. Can we do a discussion on ICON and "clusters of private chains connected to a public chain" ? (14 points, 13 comments)
  34. 97 points, 8 submissions: kelraku
    1. Thoughts on Mimblewimble? (23 points, 13 comments)
    2. Has anyone looked at the lelantus protocol? (18 points, 6 comments)
    3. How much control do developers have over the coins (18 points, 6 comments)
    4. Lesser known protocols? (11 points, 17 comments)
    5. Zerocoin and Blockchain Analysis (9 points, 5 comments)
    6. Zerocoin vs Cryptonote (7 points, 14 comments)
    7. Lightning network privacy (6 points, 13 comments)
    8. Integrity of the DAG (5 points, 17 comments)
  35. 96 points, 6 submissions: blockstasy
    1. How to Get to One Million Devs (32 points, 12 comments)
    2. The Decade in Blockchain — 2010 to 2020 in Review (27 points, 4 comments)
    3. Ethereum by the Numbers – The Year of 2019 (26 points, 9 comments)
    4. Knowledge Drop: Mining and the role it plays with the Ethereum blockchain (5 points, 0 comments)
    5. A great article that explains Ethereum’s Muir Glacier Update (4 points, 0 comments)
    6. Youtube Silences Crypto Community (2 points, 6 comments)
  36. 93 points, 3 submissions: OneOverNever
    1. Which is the last WHITE PAPER you've read that's truly impacted you? (77 points, 81 comments)
    2. [CMV] Bitcoin's intrinsic technological value. (14 points, 29 comments)
    3. What are some weak points that still hold XVG back from becoming a top player in crypto? (Technically speaking, not marketing and etc.) (2 points, 19 comments)
  37. 93 points, 3 submissions: ryano-ark
    1. (ARK) ACES Completes Integration of ARK Channels for Two-way Transfers for Easy ICOs When Paired With ARK Deployer (Push-Button-Blockchains) (57 points, 5 comments)
    2. (ARK) ACES Releases Fast (Ansible) Deployments for all ACES Applications. (23 points, 4 comments)
    3. A Future of Cryptocurrencies and Blockchains (13 points, 3 comments)
  38. 92 points, 2 submissions: BobUltra
    1. Our blockchains are all centralized! (51 points, 34 comments)
    2. List of qualities needed to dethrone Bitcoin. (41 points, 43 comments)
  39. 90 points, 1 submission: refreshx2
    1. CMV: It doesn't make sense for (crypto)companies to create coins linked to their tech (90 points, 18 comments)
  40. 89 points, 1 submission: perceptron01
    1. What does Nano do better than Steem? (89 points, 55 comments)
  41. 87 points, 1 submission: Shuk
    1. How does one begin to develop an employable skill in blockchain development? (87 points, 25 comments)
  42. 87 points, 1 submission: conorohiggins
    1. I spent three weeks researching and writing a huge guide to stablecoins. Enjoy! (87 points, 36 comments)
  43. 86 points, 1 submission: Bacon_Hero
    1. ELI5: Why did it take so long for blockchain technology to be created? (86 points, 66 comments)
  44. 85 points, 3 submissions: theFoot58
    1. If crypto now is like 'the Internet' of the past, where are we? (65 points, 53 comments)
    2. If the Internet had its Genesis Block, what would it be? (14 points, 9 comments)
    3. Coin grouping - ruby and CryptoCompare API (6 points, 1 comment)
  45. 85 points, 1 submission: youngm2
    1. Which decentralised exchange has the most promise for 2018? (85 points, 89 comments)
  46. 84 points, 4 submissions: bLbGoldeN
    1. On Mass Adoption of Cryptocurrencies (28 points, 68 comments)
    2. Join the Bloom team for our first tech AMA tomorrow (Tuesday, March 13th) at 7 PM GMT! (23 points, 2 comments)
    3. Join the Decred team for an AMA - Friday, June 1st from 19:00 to 22:00 UTC (17 points, 10 comments)
    4. Join the district0x team for an AMA Monday, April 2nd at 5:00 PM (GMT) (16 points, 0 comments)
  47. 82 points, 2 submissions: SubsequentDownfall
    1. Has a 51% attack ever been witnessed? (45 points, 46 comments)
    2. Is a DAG coin like RaiBlocks able to be private like Monero? (37 points, 40 comments)
  48. 82 points, 2 submissions: guidre
    1. Tron and other source Code (42 points, 24 comments)
    2. Why Will companies adopt blockchain, the user interface is complex and i'm not sure that many companies want all their internal dealings made public. (40 points, 19 comments)
  49. 81 points, 4 submissions: solar128
    1. New Atomic Swap Tools Released (35 points, 4 comments)
    2. Using Blockchain to make a censorship-resistant Reddit (28 points, 14 comments)
    3. Best security practices for addressing Spectre & Meltdown (13 points, 0 comments)
    4. Influence of on-chain governance weighted by wealth - good or bad? (5 points, 2 comments)
  50. 81 points, 2 submissions: Blockchainsapiens
    1. Blockchain study finds 0.00% success rate and vendors don't call back when asked for evidence (47 points, 30 comments)
    2. The elephant in the room: would the public ever use a volatile currency over a stable currency? (34 points, 45 comments)
  51. 81 points, 1 submission: Mycryptopedia
    1. Understanding the Tech Behind RaiBlocks (81 points, 7 comments)
  52. 81 points, 1 submission: davidvanbeveren
    1. Article thoroughly analysing / comparing IOTA and RaiBlocks (x-post /CryptoCurrency) (81 points, 10 comments)
  53. 77 points, 4 submissions: DeleteMyOldAccount
    1. HD Wallets Explained: What they are, and how to make them coin agnostic (28 points, 11 comments)
    2. Bitcoin Cash May 15th fork (23 points, 22 comments)
    3. So you want to build a Bitcoin HD wallet? Part 1 (23 points, 3 comments)
    4. Applications of Blockchain in Supply Chain (3 points, 9 comments)
  54. 76 points, 3 submissions: kryptofinger
    1. Why would anyone bother using any DPOS coins for dapps like Eos over normal systems like AWS? (44 points, 104 comments)
    2. Could a state backed privacy coin work? (22 points, 32 comments)
    3. Thoughts on Elastos? (10 points, 8 comments)
  55. 76 points, 1 submission: francohab
    1. 55% of the Nano representative nodes are "official representatives", presumably held by developers. How big of an issue is that? (76 points, 46 comments)
  56. 75 points, 2 submissions: MerkleChainsaw
    1. The biggest challenge for cryptocurrencies and how to mitigate it (73 points, 37 comments)
    2. Short and long term design tradeoffs in crypto (2 points, 2 comments)
  57. 75 points, 1 submission: jatsignwork
    1. Raiblocks & Spam (75 points, 60 comments)
  58. 74 points, 1 submission: behindtext
    1. Hello, this is Jake Yocom-Piatt. Ask me anything about Decred! (74 points, 49 comments)
  59. 73 points, 2 submissions: TexasRadical83
    1. Why use a new "currency" at all? (40 points, 48 comments)
    2. Why are big price increases for crypto a good thing? (33 points, 41 comments)

Top Commenters

  1. Neophyte- (1649 points, 746 comments)
  2. ndha1995 (583 points, 98 comments)
  3. turtleflax (406 points, 116 comments)
  4. senzheng (326 points, 193 comments)
  5. holomntn (294 points, 40 comments)
  6. manly_ (286 points, 43 comments)
  7. signos_de_admiracion (250 points, 18 comments)
  8. fgiveme (231 points, 77 comments)
  9. crypto_kang (222 points, 45 comments)
  10. jatsignwork (220 points, 37 comments)
  11. GainsLean (218 points, 76 comments)
  12. benthecarman (211 points, 48 comments)
  13. rockyrainy (200 points, 39 comments)
  14. hungryforitalianfood (197 points, 58 comments)
  15. rocksolid77 (190 points, 20 comments)
  16. bannercoin (189 points, 11 comments)
  17. insette (181 points, 47 comments)
  18. DiogenicOrder (175 points, 41 comments)
  19. islanavarino (173 points, 51 comments)
  20. behindtext (172 points, 14 comments)
  21. takitus (171 points, 25 comments)
  22. sukitrebek (170 points, 42 comments)
  23. UnknownEssence (170 points, 31 comments)
  24. crypto_ha (170 points, 26 comments)
  25. AlexCoventry (167 points, 17 comments)
  26. DragonWhsiperer (165 points, 38 comments)
  27. stop-making-accounts (164 points, 57 comments)
  28. KnifeOfPi2 (157 points, 13 comments)
  29. Edgegasm (156 points, 42 comments)
  30. ippond (152 points, 15 comments)
  31. dontlikecomputers (151 points, 61 comments)
  32. QRCollector (150 points, 46 comments)
  33. alexrecuenco (145 points, 18 comments)
  34. BobUltra (144 points, 88 comments)
  35. SpamCamel (135 points, 22 comments)
  36. InterdisciplinaryHum (133 points, 107 comments)
  37. theglitteringone (132 points, 10 comments)
  38. ChocolateSunrise (128 points, 23 comments)
  39. PM_ME_UR_QUINES (125 points, 4 comments)
  40. narwhale111 (122 points, 15 comments)
  41. pepe_le_shoe (121 points, 47 comments)
  42. Darius510 (119 points, 39 comments)
  43. glen-hodl (118 points, 21 comments)
  44. HOG_ZADDY (117 points, 23 comments)
  45. coranos2 (116 points, 44 comments)
  46. etherenvoy (116 points, 15 comments)
  47. johnny_milkshakes (115 points, 55 comments)
  48. galan77 (115 points, 52 comments)
  49. hybridsole (113 points, 40 comments)
  50. funciton (113 points, 8 comments)
  51. Mr0ldy (110 points, 24 comments)
  52. Corm (109 points, 42 comments)
  53. cryptoscopia (109 points, 7 comments)
  54. ReportFromHell (106 points, 39 comments)
  55. broscientologist (105 points, 26 comments)
  56. straytjacquet (104 points, 28 comments)
  57. Quadling (101 points, 24 comments)
  58. BlockEnthusiast (101 points, 17 comments)
  59. thats_not_montana (99 points, 37 comments)
  60. TheRealMotherOfOP (98 points, 27 comments)
  61. yarauuta (96 points, 11 comments)
  62. pegasuspect93 (96 points, 1 comment)
  63. andrew_bao (93 points, 40 comments)
  64. samdotla (93 points, 6 comments)
  65. melodious_punk (91 points, 34 comments)
  66. Mquantum (91 points, 31 comments)
  67. TJ_Hooker15 (91 points, 27 comments)
  68. NoFaptain99 (91 points, 3 comments)
  69. ilielezi (87 points, 10 comments)
  70. Raapop (87 points, 2 comments)
  71. Allways_Wrong (86 points, 36 comments)
  72. bLbGoldeN (86 points, 19 comments)
  73. ResIpsaLoquiturrr (86 points, 15 comments)
  74. kabelman93 (85 points, 29 comments)
  75. no_pants_gamer (84 points, 9 comments)
  76. AnkurTechracers (83 points, 16 comments)
  77. ric2b (83 points, 11 comments)
  78. Big_Goose (83 points, 10 comments)
  79. Lifeistooshor1 (82 points, 21 comments)
  80. vornth (82 points, 11 comments)
  81. Sargos (81 points, 25 comments)
  82. refreshx2 (81 points, 16 comments)
  83. Qwahzi (78 points, 27 comments)
  84. StupidRandomGuy (77 points, 35 comments)
  85. WikiTextBot (77 points, 24 comments)
  86. SnootyEuropean (77 points, 5 comments)
  87. cryptogainz (76 points, 14 comments)
  88. frequentlywrong (76 points, 4 comments)
  89. the_defiant (76 points, 4 comments)
  90. BrangdonJ (75 points, 28 comments)
  91. hendrik_v (75 points, 7 comments)
  92. solar128 (74 points, 18 comments)
  93. foobazzler (74 points, 8 comments)
  94. ginger_beer_m (73 points, 35 comments)
  95. kAhmij (73 points, 25 comments)
  96. DeleteMyOldAccount (73 points, 20 comments)
  97. sn0wr4in (73 points, 9 comments)
  98. Dyslectic_Sabreur (72 points, 5 comments)
  99. X7spyWqcRY (71 points, 8 comments)
  100. Krapser (70 points, 5 comments)

Top Submissions

  1. A Guided Reading of Bitcoin’s Original White Paper by Realness100 (202 points, 10 comments)
  2. From a technical standpoint: Why does every blockchain projects need their own coins? by HSPremier (181 points, 50 comments)
  3. Bitcoin Gold hit by Double Spend Attack (51% attack). The Attacker reversed 22 blocks. by rockyrainy (179 points, 102 comments)
  4. Why white papers in crypto world are so unprofessional? by ilielezi (175 points, 88 comments)
  5. My brief observation of most common Consensus Algorithms by tracyspacygo (159 points, 49 comments)
  6. Proof-of-Approval: Stake Based, 1 Block Finality & History Attack Defense by shunsaitakahashi (147 points, 4 comments)
  7. "Do you need a Blockchain?" - this paper is fantastic, everyone should read this before evaluating a coin and if requires a block chain to solve a solution the coin is promising to solve. by Neophyte- (136 points, 41 comments)
  8. Technical comparison of LIGHTNING vs TANGLE vs HASHGRAPH vs NANO by Qwahzi (133 points, 37 comments)
  9. Everytime I try to investigate the technology behind Cardano(Ada), I come across the words "scientific" and "peer-reviewed" over and over but almost no actual details. Can someone fill how this coin actually works and where they are in development? by RufusTheFirefly (126 points, 49 comments)
  10. How do we change the culture around cryptocurrency? by FashionistaGuru (118 points, 54 comments)

Top Comments

  1. 160 points: holomntn's comment in ELI5: Why did it take so long for blockchain technology to be created?
  2. 121 points: KnifeOfPi2's comment in How do we change the culture around cryptocurrency?
  3. 105 points: theglitteringone's comment in Outside of currency and voting, blockchain is awful and shouldnt be used. Can anyone explain where blockchain is worth the cost?
  4. 102 points: benthecarman's comment in If crypto now is like 'the Internet' of the past, where are we?
  5. 96 points: pegasuspect93's comment in If crypto now is like 'the Internet' of the past, where are we?
  6. 95 points: bannercoin's comment in Realistically, why would anybody expect the startup crypto platforms to beat out the corporate giants who are developing their own Blockchain as a Service (BaaS) solutions? Ex. IBM, SAP, JP Morgan...
  7. 83 points: AlexCoventry's comment in Ethereum private key with all zeroes leads to an account with 5000$ on it
  8. 82 points: deleted's comment in Is blockchain really useful ?
  9. 81 points: signos_de_admiracion's comment in Why white papers in crypto world are so unprofessional?
  10. 78 points: NoFaptain99's comment in Why do so many of these businesses need a token? (Unsure)
Generated with BBoe's Subreddit Stats
submitted by subreddit_stats to subreddit_stats [link] [comments]

Crash course in Bitcoin privacy (incl reading material)

Nobody in bitcoin is interested in securing your privacy, except you yourself. Below is an incomplete list of things that an average user can do to increase their privacy on the bitcoin network.
DO:
DON'T:
Reading material:
very extensive privacy wiki (see “Methods for improving privacy” especially), by u/belcher_: https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Privacy
privacy FAQ by u/6102bitcoin: https://github.com/6102bitcoin/FAQ/blob/mastehodl-privacy.md
“Beginner’s Guide to Lightning on a Raspberry Pi” (includes connecting your hardware wallet to the Raspberry node, setting up Tor etc.. feel free to skip the Lightning part and jump to bonus section if only interested in privacy), by u/stadicus: https://stadicus.github.io/RaspiBolt/
very basic introduction to some of the privacy pitfalls in bitcoin: https://bitcoin.org/en/protect-your-privacy
"Bitcoin Anonymity Guide 2019: How to use BTC like a straight up G": https://www.coincache.net/2019/01/02/bitcoin-anonymity-guide-2019-how-to-use-btc-like-a-straight-up-g/
submitted by TheGreatMuffin to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

User Guide, FAQ and 10 Commandments

Dear Wasabikas,
Thank you all for taking the time to consider your privacy, and welcome to the community. This post is a guide for using Wasabi and should be read before reaching out for help. Currently Wasabi Support accepts questions in the following languages: English, Spanish (español), French (français), Russian (Русский), Italian (italiano) and Hungarian (magyar).
Our support team now has a dedicated PGP key set:
PGP Fingerprint: 30FE 98B2 6219 2F35 72BB 9C6D F8FC B536 5407 1408
You may choose to ask for help more discretely through DM, or perhaps you have sensitive information that you may need to share. We recommend encrypting data against the support key, however you may choose to encrypt messages against any of the following keys you trust (you may also encrypt against several keys).

After you have looked through the commandments, please check out our FAQ written by 6102bitcoin, and our community built documentation: https://github.com/zkSNACKs/WalletWasabi/blob/masteWalletWasabi.Documentation/FAQ.md https://docs.wasabiwallet.io/

The Ten Commandments

1 - Wasabi is for defense only

2 - Verify the integrity of your software

Wasabi Wallet is an open-source project with many contributors. When downloading the wallet, you may chose to go to the official site or to the official GitHub to build from source. Wasabi is available at our official site:
https://wasabiwallet.io/ (Clear-net)
http://wasabiukrxmkdgve5kynjztuovbg43uxcbcxn6y2okcrsg7gb6jdmbad.onion
Please check signatures after completing downloads, the concern here is that you may accidentally fall for a phishing attempt and be on a malicious site downloading a malicious piece of software.
Alternatively, you may also build the code from source here, instructions are available here:
https://github.com/zkSNACKs/WalletWasabi

3 - Keep your mnemonic words and password safely stored (BOTH!)

When creating a new wallet - write down your mnemonic seed AND password and store those safely. Wasabi is a fully non-custodial wallet, which means that should always be in possession of your keys, and this means safely storing a backup in case your computer is lost or the wallet crashes. Often times when things go wrong, users panic. If you have done this step, there is very little you have to worry about. Also, under no circumstance should you reveal the password or mnemonic words to anyone that asks for them. Lastly, understand that if you lose your password, it becomes much harder (if not impossible) to restore your wallet - so store both safely!

4 - Practice good labeling AND try to never reuse addresses

Each time you receive coins, you will be asked to create a label. This label is only for you and is stored exclusively on your device. Wasabi has strong coin control features, and as you continue to use the wallet, you will observe that the history of your coins will appear, and this history is only useful to you if you are practicing good labeling. An example of a good label:
June 20 - $400 from Coinbase, primary account
June 7 - 0.2 BTC Received from Bob via Bisq
Examples of bad labels:
Address #1
0.5 BTC
Lastly, if you must use an exchange, try to ask for a new deposit address on each deposit. In the same way that you should never receive Bitcoin to the same address twice, you should try to avoiding sending Bitcoin to the same address twice.

5 - CoinJoin whenever possible and be patient!

The process of engaging in a CoinJoin is as simple as selecting a coin or coins to en-queue and entering your password. Once coins have en-queued for CoinJoining, you must keep your computer online and awake, as the CoinJoin process is interactive. As a coinjoin is really just many users (up to 100) en-queuing coins at the same time, it may take up to two hours for you to successfully participate in a CoinJoin and clean outputs should only be spent once the CoinJoin transaction is confirmed. For context, Wasabi currently does 18 CoinJoins a day, or roughly one every 1 hour and 20 minutes. As more users join the network, the frequency of these CoinJoins will go up. Lastly, if you are able and patient enough to re-mix your coins, please do so. Re-mixing coins is nearly free and greatly encouraged!

6 - Use separate profiles

When you put a label on an address, or ask a question on this Reddit or send coins to a merchant be wary of the profile you choose. If you can create a dummy Reddit account as opposed to an account where you may have revealed your personal details elsewhere - use that. When you spend coins from your wallet, consider what you might want to keep private from the merchant or individual you are interacting with. In the same way that reusing addresses hurts your privacy, consolidating all of your online behavior into one profile can do the same.

7 - Never merge mixed and unmixed coins, and avoid large merges of mixed coins!

The first part should be somewhat intuitive - coins in your wallet have shields (red, yellow, green and green +) and it is at a minimum important to never send non-red coins (coins with anonset > 1) with red coins (coins with anonset == 1). By merging your tainted coins with your mixed coins, you undo the privacy benefits of CoinJoins! Further, when sending mixed coins to your cold storage, make sure to send your coins in parallel. Don't merge all of your Bitcoin (more than 0.8 BTC) in a single transaction! Instead, take your time and send coins to multiple addresses belong to your cold storage over a few hours or days. If you are sending coins to an exchange, you can get the same result by requesting a brand new address to receive coins.
For more information, please see the discussions here: https://www.reddit.com/WasabiWallet/comments/avxbjy/combining_mixed_coins_privacy_megathread/

8 - Avoid 3rd party servers & Buy Bitcoin P2P

Wasabi is designed to allow users to see their balances without any concern that a third party would be able to link your addresses to you, or to each other. Very few wallets can say this, but if you proceed to enter your address into a block explorer, or use a third party wallet with your keys or your hardware device - all bets are off. So if you want to check on the status of a transaction or the balance on an address, you should first:
(a) Check your Wasabi Wallet
(b) Check through your full node
(c) Use a block explorer through Tor (e.g. Blockstream.info T address)
If you think that forensics companies are not paying big money to block explorers for user information, you are wrong. Even something as simple as leaving a comment on a YouTube video or Reddit post will be scraped.
More importantly, if you are using a hardware wallet, an easy way to undo the previous times you plugged in the wallet through non-private applications is to create a new account on the device with a passphrase. For example, for ledger nano s, you can do this in the device home screen > security > passphrase. Remember Commandment 2!
Remember, Bitcoin is a peer-to-peer cash system, so when you have the opportunity to do so, buy your coins directly from someone you know or through a P2P market place. Not only will this benefit your privacy, it will save you on exchange fees and potential insolvency issues with the exchange you are dealing with.

9 - Run your own full node (if you can)

Wasabi will work just fine without a local full node on your device, however, if you can spare the resources on your device, running a full node will do that much more for your privacy. Local full nodes will (when running in tandem with Wasabi) be automatically used for querying blocks.

10 - Use Lightning

Wasabi is an ideal wallet for many things, but trade-offs exist with everything. If you have small amounts of un-mixed change from previous CoinJoins and you are unable to meet the requirements to engage in a COinJoin, consider using that coin to open a lightning channel. Lightning is still a project in its' early days, but the privacy topology of lightning payments is much more ideal over on-chain payments if you have the choice. Routing large amounts can be uncertain, but for small amounts the network is becoming steadily more reliable. Currently Wasabi does not support in-wallet lightning features, but it is on the road-map.

Credits

Much of this list comes from the work of our good friends at JoinMaket. In particular, we need to thank Adam Gibson (u/waxwing) and Chris Belcher (u/belcher_) for their outstanding contribution to privacy in Bitcoin. Please take a look at https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Privacy , https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/JoinMarket and the github https://github.com/JoinMarket-Org.
Edited (July 22) - Changed Commandment 7 to reflect merging theory from past months. Moved "Buy Bitcoin P2P" to commandment 8. Edited (August 5) - Added documentation page ( https://docs.wasabiwallet.io/ )
submitted by iLoveStableCoins to WasabiWallet [link] [comments]

Chinese cryptocurrency enthusiasts, what are some differences in the two communities and the technology they use/value?

I had a chinese friend from college the other day tell me that the following things are practiced pretty much across the board among the upper echelon of crypto traders/miners in China. There are obviously many different sociopolitical forces that change how bitcoin affects the people using it based on governmental and likely cultural elements as well. Thus i thought it would be interesting to discuss this and see if we can notice anything interesting considering that bitcoin has always been primarily an english/american led project (i am not discounting the great advances made by non western developers and i also acknowledge that the opposite is true when it comes to mining).
Here's what my friend told me:

OKEX OTC and Huobi OTC are very common (not sure about others but i get the impression that westerners generally stick to exchanges when moving large sums of fiat into crypto and vice versa (the slippage is usually negligible anyway)

USDT is very often used to transfer and store 'fiat' currency--which i believe is a direct result of the capital controls on china's economy

Can someone tell me what the following things are and if they're one entity or seperate projects: Thunder Network/Xunlei link, Acute angle token, acute angle cloud. It seems Xunlei is a wildly populawellfunded project that has something to do with decentralized CDN networks that require you to buy hardware similar to what 21.co initially planned to do but with another purpose swapped out for 21's plan of having mini miners everywhere.

Just thought this would be a cool discussion to have.

A couple more simple questions i imagine the public would want to know are:

How risky are the big chinese exchanges? are they running a fractional reserve and everyone knows it similar to how mtgox was in the last year of operation (remember that it still maintained ~70-90% of the TOTAL BTC DAILY volume so it was worth the risk to still trade on).
Is the volume on these exchanges fake? I remember back in the day with 0 fee exchanges topping the charts by incredible amounts--lending credibility to the theory that the exchange administrators were scheming.


Would love to jsut have an open discussion on regional differences in bitcoin/crypto culture
submitted by NYC_Prisoner to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Obvious case of Blockstream & Bitcoin Core product placement? (article series on privacy & cryptocurrencies)

In a 4-part series, Eric Wall neatly demonstrates how to do product placement for Blockstream, Bitcoin Core and their affiliates including the usual troupe of BS/Core "experts".
Note: "article series by the Human Rights Foundation (HRF) on privacy and cryptocurrency, funded by the Zcash Foundation".
Don't get me wrong, there is plenty good information contained in the articles linked below. But the product placement of Bitcoin Core, Lightning, Liquid and "Green", could hardly be more obvious. For an article series "on privacy and cryptocurrencies", there is a heavy focus on BTC except in a single part (III) where the privacy coins Zcash, Monero, Grin and Beam are examined.
I recommend you read the articles. Below I've pointed out certain items that are mentioned and linked frequently within each article.
Privacy and Cryptocurrency, Part I: How Private is Bitcoin?
Privacy and Cryptocurrency, Part II: Bitcoin Wallets
  • website: bitcoin.org (get started)
  • wallet: Bitcoin Core
  • wallet: Wasabi
  • wallet: Armory
  • wallet: mSigna
  • wallet: Bitcoin Knots
  • wallet: Electrum
  • person: Peter Todd
  • person: Jameson Lopp
  • person: Udi Wertheimer
  • person: Hampus Sjöberg
  • hardware wallet: Trezor
  • hardware wallet: Ledger
  • payment server: BTCPay Server
  • payment code service: PayNym.is (made by Samourai)
  • 2nd layer: Lightning Network
  • sidechain: Liquid (by Blockstream)
  • wallet: Blockstream Green (linked via blockstream site)
  • wallet: Samourai (linked via it's own site)
  • wallet: BRD (linked via bitcoin.org!)
  • wallet: Schildbach (linked via bitcoin.org!)
  • mailing list: bitcoin-dev (run by Bitcoin Core people)
Privacy and Cryptocurrency, Part III: Should You Use a Privacy Coin?
  • Lightning
  • Liquid
  • coin: Monero
  • coin: Zcash
  • coin: Grin
  • coin: Beam
  • person: Daniel Lehnberg (Grin)
  • person: Andrew Poelstra (Blockstream, MimbleWimble)
  • person: Guy Corem.(Beam)
  • person: Ian Miers (Zcash)
  • person: Francisco Cabañas (Monero)
Privacy and Cryptocurrency, Part IV: Stablecoins— Blacklists and Traceability
  • coin: USDT on Liquid
  • wallet: Blockstream Green
  • Lightning Network (for future support of Liquid tokens like USDT)
  • person: Jameson Lopp
  • person: Matt Odell
As we can see, every article prominently highlights of Blockstream or Bitcoin Core affiliated products, persons or related companies. And every article studiously omits any mention of Bitcoin Cash or any of the privacy technologies built on it (CashShuffle) or in development on it (CashFusion), or the stable coin USDH operating on top of Bitcoin Cash.
There are certainly other cryptocurrencies and projects on them which offer privacy features, but are left unexamined in this series (e.g. projects offering privacy on ETH, mixing in Dash, etc)
In conclusion the intentions ascribed to the HRF in the first article.
The intention of the Human Rights Foundation is to examine these technologies and elucidate on their potential of bringing economic and political freedom to the individual. While there are many angles in the context of money that are within the scope of such an endeavor, we’ve chosen to focus on the topic of privacy foremost. In that pursuit it’s also clear that the degree to which cryptocurrencies enable privacy is not by any means trivial or binary — it varies greatly depending on the user’s particular choice of core and ancillary technologies and usage patterns, as well as the capabilities and sophistication of the attacker.
submitted by DarthBacktrack to btc [link] [comments]

/r/Bitcoin FAQ - Newcomers please read

Welcome to the /Bitcoin Sticky FAQ

You've probably been hearing a lot about Bitcoin recently and are wondering what's the big deal? Most of your questions should be answered by the resources below but if you have additional questions feel free to ask them in the comments.
The following videos are a good starting point for understanding how bitcoin works and a little about its long term potential:
For some more great introductory videos check out Andreas Antonopoulos's YouTube playlists, he is probably the best bitcoin educator out there today. Also have to give mention to James D'Angelo's Bitcoin 101 Blackboard series. Lots of additional video resources can be found at the videos wiki page or /BitcoinTV.
Key properties of bitcoin
Some excellent writing on Bitcoin's value proposition and future can be found here. Bitcoin statistics can be found here, here and here. Developer resources can be found here and here. Peer-reviewed research papers can be found here. The number of times Bitcoin was declared dead by the media can be found here. Scaling resources here, and of course the whitepaper that started it all.

Where can I buy bitcoins?

BuyBitcoinWorldwide.com and Howtobuybitcoin.io are helpful sites for beginners. You can buy or sell any amount of bitcoin and there are several easy methods to purchase bitcoin with cash, credit card or bank transfer. Some of the more popular resources are below, also, check out the bitcoinity exchange resources for a larger list of options for purchases.
Bank Transfer Credit / Debit card Cash
Coinbase Coinbase LocalBitcoins
Gemini Bitstamp LibertyX
GDAX Bitit Mycelium LocalTrader
Bitstamp Cex.io BitQuick
Kraken CoinMama WallofCoins
Xapo BitcoinOTC
Cex.io
itBit
Bitit
Bitsquare
Here is a listing of local ATMs. If you would like your paycheck automatically converted to bitcoin use Cashila or Bitwage.
Note: Bitcoins are valued at whatever market price people are willing to pay for them in balancing act of supply vs demand. Unlike traditional markets, bitcoin markets operate 24 hours per day, 365 days per year. Preev is a useful site that that shows how much various denominations of bitcoin are worth in different currencies. Alternatively you can just Google "1 bitcoin in (your local currency)".

Securing your bitcoins

With bitcoin you can "Be your own bank" and personally secure your bitcoins OR you can use third party companies aka "Bitcoin banks" which will hold the bitcoins for you.
Android iOs Desktop
Mycelium BreadWallet Electrum
CoPay AirBitz Armory
Another interesting use case for physical storage/transfer is the Opendime. Opendime is a small USB stick that allows you to spend Bitcoin by physically passing it along so it's anonymous and tangible like cash.
Note: For increased security, use Two Factor Authentication (2FA) everywhere it is offered, including email!
2FA requires a second confirmation code to access your account, usually from a text message or app, making it much harder for thieves to gain access. Google Authenticator and Authy are the two most popular 2FA services, download links are below. Make sure you create backups of your 2FA codes.
Google Auth Authy
Android Android
iOS iOS

Where can I spend bitcoins?

A more comprehensive list can be found at the Trade FAQ but some more commons ones are below.
Store Product
Gyft Gift cards for hundreds of retailers including Amazon, Target, Walmart, Starbucks, Whole Foods, CVS, Lowes, Home Depot, iTunes, Best Buy, Sears, Kohls, eBay, GameStop, etc.
Steam, HumbleBundle, Games Planet, itch.io, g2g and kinguin For when you need to get your game on
Microsoft Xbox games, phone apps and software
Spendabit, The Bitcoin Shop, Overstock, DuoSearch, The Bitcoin Directory and BazaarBay Retail shopping with millions of results
ShakePay Generate one time use Visa cards in seconds
NewEgg and Dell For all your electronics needs
Cashila, Bitwa.la, Coinbills, Piixpay, Bitbill.eu, Bylls, Coins.ph, Bitrefill, Pey.de, LivingRoomofSatoshi, Hyphen.to, Coinsfer, GetPaidinBitcoin, Coins.co.th, More #1, #2 Bill payment
Foodler, Menufy, Takeaway, Thuisbezorgd NL, Pizza For Coins Takeout delivered to your door!
Expedia, Cheapair, Lot, Destinia, BTCTrip, Abitsky, SkyTours, Fluege the Travel category on Gyft and 9flats For when you need to get away
BoltVM, BitHost VPS service
Cryptostorm, Mullvad, and PIA VPN services
Namecheap, Porkbun For new domain name registration
Stampnik and GetUSPS Discounted USPS Priority, Express, First-Class mail postage
Reddit Gold Premium membership which can be gifted to others
Coinmap, 99Bitcoins and AirBitz are helpful to find local businesses accepting bitcoins. A good resource for UK residents is at wheretospendbitcoins.co.uk.
There are also lots of charities which accept bitcoin donations, such as Wikipedia, Red Cross, Amnesty International, United Way, ACLU and the EFF. You can find a longer list here.

Merchant Resources

There are several benefits to accepting bitcoin as a payment option if you are a merchant;
If you are interested in accepting bitcoin as a payment method, there are several options available;

Can I mine bitcoin?

Mining bitcoins can be a fun learning experience, but be aware that you will most likely operate at a loss. Newcomers are often advised to stay away from mining unless they are only interested in it as a hobby similar to folding at home. If you want to learn more about mining you can read more here. Still have mining questions? The crew at /BitcoinMining would be happy to help you out.
If you want to contribute to the bitcoin network by hosting the blockchain and propagating transactions you can run a full node using this setup guide. Bitseed is an easy option for getting set up. You can view the global node distribution here.

Earning bitcoins

Just like any other form of money, you can also earn bitcoins by being paid to do a job.
Site Description
WorkingForBitcoins, Bitwage, XBTfreelancer, Cryptogrind, Bitlancerr, Coinality, Bitgigs, /Jobs4Bitcoins, Rein Project Freelancing
OpenBazaar, Purse.io, Bitify, /Bitmarket, 21 Market Marketplaces
Watchmybit, Streamium.io, OTika.tv, XOtika.tv NSFW, /GirlsGoneBitcoin NSFW Video Streaming
Bitasker, BitforTip, WillPayCoin Tasks
Supload.com, SatoshiBox, JoyStream, File Army File/Image Sharing
CoinAd, A-ads, Coinzilla.io Advertising
You can also earn bitcoins by participating as a market maker on JoinMarket by allowing users to perform CoinJoin transactions with your bitcoins for a small fee (requires you to already have some bitcoins)

Bitcoin Projects

The following is a short list of ongoing projects that might be worth taking a look at if you are interested in current development in the bitcoin space.
Project Description
Lightning Network, Amiko Pay, and Strawpay Payment channels for network scaling
Blockstream and Drivechain Sidechains
21, Inc. Open source library for the machine payable web
ShapeShift.io Trade between bitcoins and altcoins easily
Open Transactions, Counterparty, Omni, Open Assets, Symbiont and Chain Financial asset platforms
Hivemind and Augur Prediction markets
Mirror Smart contracts
Mediachain Decentralized media library
Tierion and Factom Records & Titles on the blockchain
BitMarkets, DropZone, Beaver and Open Bazaar Decentralized markets
Samourai and Dark Wallet - abandoned Privacy-enhancing wallets
JoinMarket CoinJoin implementation (Increase privacy and/or Earn interest on bitcoin holdings)
Coinffeine and Bitsquare Decentralized bitcoin exchanges
Keybase and Bitrated Identity & Reputation management
Bitmesh and Telehash Mesh networking
JoyStream BitTorrent client with paid seeding
MORPHiS Decentralized, encrypted internet
Storj and Sia Decentralized file storage
Streamium and Faradam Pay in real time for on-demand services
Abra Global P2P money transmitter network
bitSIM PIN secure hardware token between SIM & Phone
Identifi Decentralized address book w/ ratings system
Coinometrics Institutional-level Bitcoin Data & Research
Blocktrail and BitGo Multisig bitcoin API
Bitcore Open source Bitcoin javascript library
Insight Open source blockchain API
Leet Kill your friends and take their money ;)

Bitcoin Units

One Bitcoin is quite large (hundreds of £/$/€) so people often deal in smaller units. The most common subunits are listed below:
Unit Symbol Value Info
millibitcoin mBTC 1,000 per bitcoin SI unit for milli i.e. millilitre (mL) or millimetre (mm)
microbitcoin μBTC 1,000,000 per bitcoin SI unit for micro i.e microlitre (μL) or micrometre (μm)
bit bit 1,000,000 per bitcoin Colloquial "slang" term for microbitcoin
satoshi sat 100,000,000 per bitcoin Smallest unit in bitcoin, named after the inventor
For example, assuming an arbitrary exchange rate of $500 for one Bitcoin, a $10 meal would equal:
For more information check out the Bitcoin units wiki.
Still have questions? Feel free to ask in the comments below or stick around for our weekly Mentor Monday thread. If you decide to post a question in /Bitcoin, please use the search bar to see if it has been answered before, and remember to follow the community rules outlined on the sidebar to receive a better response. The mods are busy helping manage our community so please do not message them unless you notice problems with the functionality of the subreddit. A complete list of bitcoin related subreddits can be found here
Note: This is a community created FAQ. If you notice anything missing from the FAQ or that requires clarification you can edit it here and it will be included in the next revision pending approval.
Welcome to the Bitcoin community and the new decentralized economy!
submitted by BinaryResult to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Concern about Ledger Nano X Bluetooth exposes massive blockchain signature/hardware wallet misunderstanding

I've been seeing lots of comments about people's concerns related to the bluetooth functionality, so I've took it upon myself to review how digital signatures work, and how hardware wallets sign digital transactions securely. I happen to believe the outcry exceeds the actual risk involved.
One of a cryptocurrency wallet's main job is to sign digital messages (or transactions). What does that mean? It means when I want to send BTC to some address, I create an unsigned transaction. This transaction, in its most simplistic terms, just says how much and to whom I wish to send BTC to.
The wallet runs a signature algorithm on that unsigned transaction to create a signed transaction. If you've ever used MyEtherWallet, you can see the unsigned vs. signed transaction when you try to send tokens. Whether it's a hardware or software wallet, the wallet takes your private key/seed, runs the signing algorithm on your unsigned transaction with your private key, then outputs your signed transaction. This signed transaction is just a long string of data that doesn't actually have your private key but has been altered by it.
The beauty is as long as someone has your public key (that corresponds to your private key) along with the signed transaction, they can easily verify that the person who holds that private key approved that transaction. This is all without ever exposing the private key.
So to sum up, I create an unsigned transaction that says who I want to sending something to, I use my wallet to run a signing algorithm on it with my private key, the wallet outputs the signed transaction without ever exposing the key. This signed transaction is broadcasted to the miners/stakers to verify and execute the transaction. See more info on bitcoin signatures here. Neither the unsigned nor the signed transactions contain your private key.

Now how does this apply to a hardware wallet? Your software wallet, or MEW, or Ledger Live generates the unsigned message, sends it to your hardware wallet, which in turn signs the transaction on a secure chip that holds the private key, then sends back the signed message to your computer for broadcasting to the network.
Bluetooth will allow the unsigned and signed transactions to flow wirelessly. And as we discussed above, the private key is never exposed in the unsigned or signed transactions. As long as the screen is showing what you're signing, you can never accidentally sign a transaction that sends your precious assets to some other address.
Next, the communications between your ledger nano x and computephone/tablet are encrypted. So even if someone was even somehow able to decrypt that wireless data, it would only be unsigned/signed transactions which would be worthless to them anyway! But an individual seeing that data is as likely as them trying to see data between you and your bank (HINT: very unlikely, look up HTTPS).
We are operating under the assumption that the hardware wallet has not been compromised, but that's true right now anyway.
You guys don't have any reason to be afraid as long as you trust ledger to perform the appropriate security measures and code vetting. So far, they've done pretty well.

EDIT: To visualize how a hardware wallet works, here's a diagram i quickly made in paint.
EDIT2: I'll remove mean words.
submitted by MarshallBlathers to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

Vechain in the last 30 Days: Apotheosis, Blockchain X, BMW, University partnership, DApp ecosystem, BitOcean ICO, Carbon banking, Live use cases, Early adopter rewards and more

This post is for those who are new to Cryptocurrency or want to find out more about VeChain. The text "VeChain" has been banned in this subreddit for the last 30 days. For more details about the ban itself, please visit this cryptocurrencymeta post. Changes have been made and official channels of communications have been opened up to prevent this from happening in the future.
All feedback is welcome, and all discussion is encouraged, but please no moon-posting, ridiculous price speculation or baseless FUD. Looking forward to answering any questions you guys have :) VeChain Foundation COO Kevin Feng is holding a Business AMA with Boxmining today, so new information is coming very soon.

TL:DR.

Updates from the last 30 days

It's been a big month for VeChain as they have continued to work and share with the community. Here are the updates from their Official Medium channel and Reddit Rebrand Post

New website - https://www.vechain.org/

It has loads of useful information and a well produced introduction video. I would highly recommend reading through the website to get an idea of the scope of what VeChainThor is trying to accomplish.
"We are controlled by the few, the powerful and the greedy. We should be free. Free to choose, to trade, to create. It is time for a new world, a world founded on safety and security. A world where everything you do creates power, power for all. And you, you will decide the shape of this world. The power to change the future, is in your hands. VeChain." VeChain Introduction Video

What is Blockchain X?

Blockchain X is a global enterprise level public blockchain platform. VeChainThor is referring to their network/protocol as Blockchain X, to differentiate it from Bitcoin (Blockchain 1.0) and Ethereum (Blockchain 2.0 = Blockchain 1.0 + Smart Contracts).

Blockchain X = Blockchain 2.0 + IoT + AI + VET/VeThor = A living digital ecosystem

  • Blockchain = structure - bones, muscle etc (immutable trustworthy network)
  • IoT = senses - touch, vision, taste, smell, sound (collect real world information from RFID/NFC/QR etc.)
  • VET/VeThor = bone marrow/blood - generate blood & circulate (value transfer on the network)
  • AI = brain - information synthesis (automation of network with deep learning)

VeChainThor: the top candidate for enterprise and government level adoption of Blockchain

VeChainThor has an extremely strong development plan geared towards enterprise and government level adoption. If successful in their execution, I see VeChain being the leading cryptoasset comparable to Ethereum in size. The reasons I believe they will succeed are due to their ecosystem development, innovative governance model, robust economic model and strong strategic partnerships. The evidence of their success is snowballing with each new enterprise level partner and client.

DApps & Ecosystem development

The infrastructure layer has adoption in mind at the very core. Governments and enterprises will prioritise safety and security before venturing into blockchain adoption. (Mentioned in the introduction video.) The core DApps, VeVID (Verified identity, KYC/AML), VeVOT (Voting, Governance tool) and VeSCC (Smart Contract Certification, Regulatory compliance) provide the safety and security that governments and enterprises will demand. Blockchain X will have built-in KYC/AML, Governance and Regulation compliance. This sets it apart from other protocols and ICO platforms.

Governance model

The governance model is a balanced mix of decentralisation and centralisation. With problems such as Bitcoin's scaling debate, it appears that a purely decentralised governance structure may be inefficient. VeChain will use a new model of a decentralised system through centralised channels. The final decisions will be made in a decentralised democratic process through VeVOT by stakeholders with voting authority. I believe this model will be more widely adopted as it retains some of the efficient centralised channels that enterprise & government are familiar with, while still giving overall control to the network participants via a democratic voting system.

Economic model

The two-token economic model splits the value in the network into VET and VeThor. VET's primary function is to generate VeThor. VeThor represents the underlying costs of using the VeChainThor blockchain. All smart contract execution and transactions will require payment with VeThor. Through the dynamic rate of VeThor generation, the fiat value of VeThor can be kept relatively stable. For example, if the VeThor price was too high due to an increase in enterprise demand, the VeThor generation rate can be increased, which increases supply, and brings the price back down. The opposite is also true if the VeThor price is too low. The way I see VET is a store of value, a representation of ownership of part of the network and the right to use the network. Whereas VeThor is the perfect medium of exchange and a pure utility token. By using a two-token system, VeThor can have a stable fiat value over a long period of time. A company will be able to calculate how much VeThor will be needed for a consistent fiat value year after year and will be able to budget for this. This is extremely useful for enterprise and government level adoption since it removes the inherent price volatility from a nascent market like crypto.
VeChain also has a Node system, whereby holding VET generates additional rewards. Nodes of different levels will generate up to 200% additional VeThor compared to the base rate. This encourages long term staking in the network and decreases volatility. See the Apotheosis Part II article and X Series Node article for more information. A portion of VET supply will be locked up when nodes activate. Long term VET holders will not sell and downgrade their status. This decreased supply will lead to price increases. Early adopters (Deadline to stake: Before 20th March 2018) will be rewarded in the new X Series Node system. Features include exclusive participation in VeChain ecosystem project whitelists. (Something I'm excited about since I believe there will be a handful of reverse ICOs from traditional enterprise clients)

Technology

VeChain is planning on adding more than 100 additional full-time developers by the end of 2018.
For those interested in the technology of Blockchain X, I would direct you to the Medium AMAs where the VeChain team have provided detailed answers to common questions. Hardware 1, Hardware 2, Software 1 and Software 2 are worth a read.

Strategic partners

The three strategic partners each play a key role in VeChainThor's expansion. PWC has clients which make up 85% of the Fortune 500. DNV-GL is the preferred provider of those Fortune 500 companies for management systems certification services. PWC and DNV-GL will serve to introduce their enterprise clients to VeChain and increase adoption. BitOcean is positioning itself as a Fiat on-ramp for Crypto in Japan through physical ATMs and online exchanges, with approval by Japan's Financial Services Authority. BitOcean also plans to operate in China when regulations are finalised. BitOcean represents a Fiat/VET pairing that may serve to decouple VET/BTC and lead to independence of VET from the whims of BTC price.

Evidence of adoption to date: Existing clients & Investors

VeChain currently has 180 business opportunities in their pipeline for 2018 (compared to 4 use cases in 2016 and 22 in 2017). They have real uses cases and existing clients that range from medium to large enterprises. Revealed clients include Chinese Government Gui'an New Area project, BMW, Groupe Renault, DIG, Kuehne + Nagel, China Unicom, NRCC - State Tobacco, MLILY, Sunshine culture, Hubei Sanxin Cultural Media, Fanghuwang, YIDA future, Madeforgoods and iTaotaoke. Each of these partnerships deserve a detailed post on their own, they are all available on VeChain's Medium page. Taken together, it becomes clear what type of Ecosystem VeChainThor is trying to build.
Jiangsu Printed Electronics and Xiamen Innov Information Technology are technology partners and I suspect will be mass producing the RFID/NFC chips.
Breyer Capital and Fenbushi capital are the two featured investors on VeChain's website. Jim Breyer generally makes some pretty smart investment decisions. His only other crypto investments are Circle and Ethereum.
Bonus news: This week they are presenting with DNV-GL a cold chain supply chain solution at the Global Food Safety Initiative conference 2018. Zoom in and you'll see VeChain Intelligent Control Display System. DNV-GL have also launched their new digital assurance solution, My Story™. Four top Italian wine producers are using My Story™ under supervision of the Italian wine authorities. Twitter and DNVGL link.

China's potential

China is widely known to be anti-cryptocurrency but extremely pro-blockchain. China's "13th Five year plan 2016-2020" focuses on moving up in the value chain by abandoning old heavy industry and building up bases of modern information-intensive infrastructure, with blockchain and Smart Cities being a key technological focus. VeChain has achieved approval from the Government of the People's Republic of China with Gui'an New Area project, multiple mentions on state owned media (CCTV) and deals with state owned enterprises (China Tobacco). China will not fall behind in the international Blockchain race, they will finalise regulations and adopt Blockchain rapidly in the coming years. VeChain appears to be one of the leaders in the field, with their largest office in Shanghai and existing government connections.

Leader in the field

Last but not least, VeChain is leading the field in a number of areas.
  1. Academic research: VeResearch with Michigan State University #1 for supply chain management and another university to be announced
  2. Transparency: quarterly financial reports, regular social media updates, multiple AMAs, response to cryptocurrency ban, directly addressing FUD in official Telegram channels
  3. Corporate responsibility: cryptocurrency disaster recovery plan
  4. Environmental responsibility: Carbon bank initiative with DNV-GL

Skeptics section

In the interests of balanced discussion, I will update this section with skepticism I find in the comments below.
  1. "No whitepaper"
    • VeChain are working on a Whitepaper as part of their Q1 2018 goals. Information normally found in a Whitepaper has been made available through the development plan. I'm actually not too fussed about not having a whitepaper. For me evidence of enterprise adoption is a more useful indicator of how successful VeChainThor could be.
  2. "No official wallet" "No Mainnet"
    • VeChainThor has been operating as a private blockchain since June 2016. Public VeChainThor Blockchain Launch, VeChain Wallet with VeThor Forge Function will be released in Q2 2018 according to the roadmap.
  3. "VeChain are dumping their VET on the open market"
  4. "Can we talk about the fact that the BMW "partnership" is not really a partnership? VEN is allowed to participate into a startup program hosted by BMW. BMW is not a client. http://www.bmwstartupgarage.com/partner " - u/DutchDolt
    • "BMWstartupgarage" has neither been confirmed or denied by BMW or VeChain, it has been spread by a youtuber called "Crypto Gem"
    • Going to the website linked, BMW refers to successful participants as both partners and clients
    • This is still a developing partnership with details under NDA, however the VeChain/BMW link has been confirmed at the VeChain rebranding event and by Sarah VeChain Country Manager
  5. "Vote manipulation" "Shilling" "Brigading" "You're a paid shiller"
    • In the past VeChain Telegram Moderators wilfully participated in brigading, leading to the ban on the word "VeChain" for 30 days in cryptocurrency
    • It is difficult to differentiate manipulated behaviour and organic behaviour on Reddit, the moderators here do an amazing job getting rid of spam and detecting vote manipulation
    • The Official VeChain Foundation has stepped in to help Reddit moderators prevent VeChain vote manipulation
    • Official Telegram Rules: Brigading & Reddit links: We have a new policy regarding Reddit and 'brigading'. No brigading of any kind will be allowed. If you want to post a Reddit link, do so with the "np." prefix added to its URL, for example "np.reddit.com /CryptoCurrency". No spamming for upvotes, as it hurts both of our communities.
    • This is strictly enforced by Telegram moderators and results in a warning then an insta-ban for repeat offenders
    • https://imgur.com/a/sOva9 is being copy-pasted en masse by detractors as evidence of brigading
    • Image shows Boxminig feeling sorry for WTC PR team and a "np" link to a different thread
    • I wish I got paid to shill VeChain, I made this post to share a fundamentally strong crypto with the community _________________________________________________________________________________________

An interesting perspective supported by CEO Sunny Lu

NTSpike: VeChain Thor Is Positioning to Become THE #1 Enterprise dApp Platform, and Here's Why - A Systems Analyst's Perspective
Disclaimer: My holdings are 80% VEN and remainder in NEO, WTC, TKY, XRB, AMB
submitted by enozym111 to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

Minnesota Cryptocurrency Q&A with Nano Founder Colin LeMahieu [Text Summary]

Hello all! Here are my notes from the livestream.
Overview
Mission
History
Reason for CAPTCHA faucet
Design & Architecture
Proof of Work
Anatomy of a Block
Delegated Proof of Stake & Representatives
Consensus
Key features from 2018
What's next for Nano? v19
Future versions

Q&A

Is pruning currently available?
Is Proof of Work necessary for users to vote?
Does vote weight allocation require a transaction?
What attack vectors does Nano have?
Do you have more exchanges you plan to be listed on?
How did you determine the level of PoW needed to prevent spam?
Do you currently have a system where you scale PoW to transaction size?
Can you send to multiple recipients at once with Nano?
What prevents bad actors from using their vote power maliciously?
How can rep keep the correctness of the network when transactions move so fast?
In a 51% attack, could a malicious actor prevent rep changes?
In PoW like BTC, 51% attacks require sustained resources, but not in Nano?
Has their been any research around Nano's DPoS consensus system?
What inspired you to start Nano?
Can Nano add smart contracts to the protocol?
How many developers does Nano have & what's the developer fund?
Are there any plans to add privacy to Nano?
What's deal with your FinTech startup?
Could Nano continue if something happened to you (Colin)?
Does Nano support multisig?
Is Nano working on integrations with other companies?
submitted by Qwahzi to nanocurrency [link] [comments]

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BITCOIN 30% DUMP INITIATED! BTC & CHAINLINK BEARS TAKE CONTROL - WILL THIS ONE CHART SAVE BULLS?

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