Best Bitcoin Wallets for Ubuntu – Linux Hint

Google Alternatives huge list restore your privacy

This guide aims to be the most exhaustive resource available for documenting alternatives to Google products.
With growing concerns over online privacy and securing personal data, more people than ever are considering alternatives to Google products.
After all, Google’s business model essentially revolves around data collection and advertisements, both of which infringe on your privacy. More data means better (targeted) ads and more revenue. The company pulled in over $116 billion in ad revenue last year alone – and that number continues to grow.
But the word is getting out. A growing number of people are seeking alternatives to Google products that respect their privacy and data.
So let’s get started.
Note: The lists below are not necessarily in rank order. Choose the best products and services based on your own unique needs.

Google search alternatives

When it comes to privacy, using Google search is not a good idea. When you use their search engine, Google is recording your IP address, search terms, user agent, and often a unique identifier, which is stored in cookies.
Here are ten alternatives to Google search:
  1. Searx – A privacy-friendly and versatile metasearch engine that’s also open source.
  2. MetaGer – An open source metasearch engine with good features, based in Germany.
  3. SwissCows – A zero-tracking private search engine based in Switzerland, hosted on secure Swiss infrastructure.
  4. Qwant – A private search engine based in France.
  5. DuckDuckGo – A private search engine based in the US.
  6. Mojeek – The only true search engine (rather than metasearch engine) that has its own crawler and index (based in the UK).
  7. YaCy – A decentralized, open source, peer-to-peer search engine.
  8. Givero – Based in Denmark, Givero offers more privacy than Google and combines search with charitable donations.
  9. Ecosia – Ecosia is based in Germany and donates a part of revenues to planting trees.
*Note: With the exception of Mojeek, all of the private search engines above are technically metasearch engines, since they source their results from other search engines, such as Bing and Google.
(Startpage is no longer recommended.)

Gmail alternatives

Gmail may be convenient and popular, but there are three major problems:
  1. Your inbox is used as a data collection tool. (Did you know Google is tracking your purchasing history from the receipts in your inbox?)
  2. Rather than seeing just emails, your email inbox is also used for ads and marketing.
  3. The contents of your inbox are being shared with Google and other random third parties.
When you remain logged in to your Gmail account, Google can easily track your activities online as you browse different websites, which may be hosting Google Analytics or Google ads (Adsense).
Here are ten alternatives to Gmail that do well in terms of privacy:
  1. Tutanota – based in Germany; very secure and private; free accounts up to 1 GB
  2. Mailfence – based in Belgium; lots of features; free accounts up to 500 MB
  3. Posteo – based in Germany; €1/mo with 14 day refund window
  4. StartMail – based in Netherlands; $5.00/mo with 7 day free trial
  5. Runbox – based in Norway; lots of storage and features; $1.66/mo with 30 day free trial
  6. Mailbox.org – based in Germany; €1/mo with 30 day free trial
  7. CounterMail – based in Sweden; $4.00/mo with 7 day free trial
  8. Kolab Now – based in Switzerland; €4.41/mo with 30 day money-back guarantee
  9. ProtonMail – based in Switzerland; free accounts up to 500 MB
  10. Thexyz – based in Canada; $1.95/mo with 30 day refund window

Chrome alternatives

Google Chrome is a popular browser, but it’s also a data collection tool – and many people are taking notice. Just a few days ago, the Washington Post asserted that “Google’s web browser has become spy software,” with 11,000 tracker cookies observed in a single week.
Here are seven alternatives for more privacy:
  1. Firefox browser – Firefox is a very customizable, open-source browser that is popular in privacy circles. There are also many different Firefox modifications and tweaks that will give you more privacy and security. (Also check out Firefox Focus, a privacy-focused version for mobile users.)
  2. Iridium – Based on open source Chromium, Iridium offers numerous privacy and security enhancements over Chrome, source code here.
  3. GNU IceCat – A fork of Firefox from the Free Software Foundation.
  4. Tor browser – A hardened and secured version of Firefox that runs on the Tor network by default. (It also does a good job against browser fingerprinting.)
  5. Ungoogled Chromium – Just as the name says, this is an open source version of Chromium that has been “ungoogled” and modified for more privacy.
  6. Brave – Brave is another Chromium-based browser that is rather popular. It blocks trackers and ads by default (except for “approved” ads that are part of the “Brave Ads” network).
  7. Waterfox – This is a fork of Firefox that is configured for more privacy by default, with Mozilla telemetry stripped out of the code.
Of course, there are other alternatives to Chrome, such as Safari (from Apple), Microsoft Internet ExploreEdge, Opera, and Vivaldi – but these also come with some privacy drawbacks.

Google Drive alternatives

If you’re looking for a secure cloud storage option, you can check out these Google Drive alternatives:
  1. Tresorit – A user-friendly cloud storage option based in Switzerland.
  2. ownCloud – An open source and self-hosted cloud platform developed in Germany.
  3. Nextcloud – Nextcloud is also an open source, self-hosted file sharing and collaboration platform, based in Germany.
  4. Sync – Based in Canada, Sync offers a secure, encrypted cloud storage solution for businesses and individuals.
  5. Syncthing – Here we have a decentralized, open source, peer-to-peer cloud storage platform.
Of course, Dropbox is another popular Google drive alternative, but it’s not the best in terms of privacy.

Google Calendar alternative

Here are some Google Calendar alternatives:
  1. Lightning Calendar is an open source calendar option developed by Mozilla, and it’s compatible with Thunderbird and Seamonkey.
  2. Etar, an open source, basic calendar option.
  3. Fruux, an open source calendar with good features and support for many operating systems.
For those wanting a combined solution for both email and calendar functionality, these providers offer that:

Google Docs / Sheets / Slides alternative

There are many solid Google Docs alternatives available. The largest offline document editing suite is, of course, Microsoft Office. As most people know, however, Microsoft is not the best company for privacy. Nonetheless, there are a few other good Google Docs alternatives:
  1. CryptPad – CryptPad is a privacy-focused alternative with strong encryption, and it’s free.
  2. Etherpad – A self-hosted collaborative online editor that’s also open source.
  3. Mailfence Documents – From the Mailfence team, this is a secure file sharing, storage, and collaboration tool.
  4. Zoho Docs – This is another good Google Docs alternative with a clean interface and good functionality, although it may not be the best for privacy.
  5. OnlyOffice – OnlyOffice feels a bit more restricted than some of the other options in terms of features.
  6. Cryptee – This is a privacy-focused platform for photo and document storage and editing. It’s open source and based in Estonia.
  7. LibreOffice (offline) – You can use LibreOffice which is free and open source.
  8. Apache OpenOffice (offline) – Another good open source office suite.

Google Photos alternative

Here are a few good Google Photos alternatives:
Shoebox was another alternative, but it closed operations in June 2019.

YouTube alternatives

Unfortunately, YouTube alternatives can really be hit or miss, with most struggling to gain popularity.
  1. Peertube
  2. DTube
  3. Bitchute
  4. invidio.us
  5. Vimeo
  6. Bit.tube
  7. Dailymotion
  8. Hooktube
Tip: Invidio.us is a great Youtube proxy that allows you to watch any Youtube video without logging in, even if the video is somehow restricted. To do this, simply replace [www.youtube.com] with [invidio.us] in the URL you want to view.

Google translate alternative

Here are a few Google translate alternatives I have come across:
  1. DeepL – DeepL is a solid Google Translate alternative that seems to give great results. Like Google Translate, DeepL allows you to post up to 5,000 characters at a time (but the pro version is unlimited). The user interface is good and there is also a built-in dictionary feature.
  2. Linguee – Linguee does not allow you to post large blocks of text like DeepL. However, Linguee will give you very accurate translations for single words or phrases, along with context examples.
  3. dict.cc – This Google Translate alternative seems to do a decent job on single-world lookups, but it also feels a bit outdated.
  4. Swisscows Translate – A good translation service supporting many languages.
If you want to translate blocks of text, check out DeepL. If you want in-depth translations for single words or phrases, then Linguee is a good choice.

Google analytics alternative

For website admins, there are many reasons to use an alternative to Google analytics. Aside from privacy concerns, there are also faster and more user-friendly alternatives that also respect your visitors’ privacy.
  1. Clicky is a great alternative to Google Analytics that truncates and anonymizes visitor IP addresses by default. It is lightweight, user-friendly, and fully compliant with GDPR regulations, while also being certified by Privacy Shield.
  2. Matomo (formerly Piwik) is an open-source analytics platform that respects the privacy of visitors by anonymizing and truncating visitor IP addresses (if enabled by the website admin). It is also certified to respect user privacy.
  3. Fathom Analytics is an open source alternative to Google Analytics that’s available on Github here. It’s minimal, fast, and lightweight.
  4. Get Insights – Another privacy-focused analytics platform, with a full analytics suite. The front-end client is open source and available here.
  5. AT Internet is a France-based analytics provider that is fully GDPR compliant, with all data stored on French servers, and a good track record going back to 1996.
Many websites host Google Analytics because they run Google Adsense campaigns. Without Google Analytics, tracking performance of these campaigns would be difficult. Nonetheless, there are still better options for privacy.

Google Maps alternative

A map alternative for PCs is OpenStreetMap.
A few Google Maps alternatives for mobile devices include:
  1. OsmAnd is a free and open-source mobile maps app for both Android and iOS (based on OpenStreetMap data).
  2. Maps (F Droid) uses OpenStreetMap data (offline).
  3. Maps.Me is another option that is free on both Android and iOS, but there is a fair amount of data collection with this alternative, as explained in their privacy policy.
  4. MapHub is also based on OpenStreeMap data and it does not collect locations or user IP addresses.
Note: Waze is not an “alternative” as it is now owned by Google.

Google Play Store alternative

Currently the best Google Play Store alternative is to use F-Droid and then go through the Yalp store. As explained on the official site, F-Droid is an installable catalog of FOSS (Free and Open Source Software) applications for the Android platform.
After you have installed F-Droid, you can then download the Yalp store APK, which allows you to download apps from the Google Play Store directly as APK files.
📷The Yalp Store is a good alternative to the Google Play Store.
See the F-Droid website or the official GitHub page for more info. Other alternatives to the Google Play Store include:

Google Chrome OS alternative

Want to ditch the Chromebook and Chrome OS? Here are a few alternatives:
  1. Linux – Of course, Linux is arguably the best alternative, being a free, open-source operating system with lots of different flavors. With some adjustments, Linux Ubuntu can be run on Chromebooks.
  2. Tails – Tails is a free, privacy-focused operating system based on Linux that routes all traffic through the Tor network.
  3. QubesOS – Recommended by Snowden, free, and also open source.
Of course, the other two big operating system alternatives are Windows and Apple’s operating system for MacBooks – Mac OS. Windows, particularly Windows 10, is a very bad option for privacy. While slightly better, Apple also collects user data and has partnered with the NSA) for surveillance.

Android alternatives

The biggest alternative to Android is iOS from Apple. But we’ll skip over that for reasons already mentioned. Here are a few Android OS alternatives:
  1. LineageOS – A free and open-source operating system for phones and tablets based on Android.
  2. Ubuntu Touch – A mobile version of the Ubuntu operating system.
  3. Plasma Mobile – An open source, Linux-based operating system with active development.
  4. Sailfish OS – Another open source, Linux-based mobile OS.
  5. Replicant – A fully free Android distribution with an emphasis on freedom, privacy, and security.
  6. /e/ – This is another open source project with a focus on privacy and security.
Purism is also working on a privacy-focused mobile phone called the Librem 5. It is in production, but not yet available (estimated Q3 2019).

Google Hangouts alternatives

Here are some alternatives to Google Hangouts:
  1. Wire – A great all-around secure messenger, video, and chat app, but somewhat limited on the number of people who can chat together in a group conversation via voice or video.
  2. Signal – A good secure messenger platform from Open Whisper Systems.
  3. Telegram – A longtime secure messenger app, formerly based in Russia, now in Dubai.
  4. Riot – A privacy-focused encrypted chat service that is also open source.

Google Domains alternative

Google Domains is a domain registration service. Here are a few alternatives:
  1. Namecheap – I like Namecheap because all domain purchases now come with free WhoisGuard protection for life, which protects your contact information from third parties. Namecheap also accepts Bitcoin and offers domain registration, hosting, email, SSL certs, and a variety of other products.
  2. Njalla – Njalla is a privacy-focused domain registration service based in Nevis. They offer hosting options, too, and also accept cryptocurrency payments.
  3. OrangeWebsite – OrangeWebsite offers anonymous domain registration services and also accepts cryptocurrency payments, based in Iceland.

Other Google alternatives

Here more alternatives for various Google products:
Google forms alternativeJotForm is a free online form builder.
Google Keep alternative – Below are a few different Google Keep alternatives:
Google Fonts alternative – Many websites load Google fonts through Google APIs, but that’s not necessary. One alternative to this is to use Font Squirrel, which has a large selection of both Google and non-Google fonts which are free to download and use.
Google Voice alternativeJMP.chat (both free and paid)
G Suite alternativeZoho is probably the best option
Google Firebase alternativeKuzzle (free and open source)
Google Blogger alternativesWordPress, Medium, and Ghost are all good options.
submitted by giganticcobra to degoogle [link] [comments]

guide to how to restore your privacy huge list

This guide aims to be the most exhaustive resource available for documenting alternatives to Google products.
With growing concerns over online privacy and securing personal data, more people than ever are considering alternatives to Google products.
After all, Google’s business model essentially revolves around data collection and advertisements, both of which infringe on your privacy. More data means better (targeted) ads and more revenue. The company pulled in over $116 billion in ad revenue last year alone – and that number continues to grow.
But the word is getting out. A growing number of people are seeking alternatives to Google products that respect their privacy and data.
So let’s get started.
Note: The lists below are not necessarily in rank order. Choose the best products and services based on your own unique needs.

Google search alternatives

When it comes to privacy, using Google search is not a good idea. When you use their search engine, Google is recording your IP address, search terms, user agent, and often a unique identifier, which is stored in cookies.
Here are ten alternatives to Google search:
  1. Searx – A privacy-friendly and versatile metasearch engine that’s also open source.
  2. MetaGer – An open source metasearch engine with good features, based in Germany.
  3. SwissCows – A zero-tracking private search engine based in Switzerland, hosted on secure Swiss infrastructure.
  4. Qwant – A private search engine based in France.
  5. DuckDuckGo – A private search engine based in the US.
  6. Mojeek – The only true search engine (rather than metasearch engine) that has its own crawler and index (based in the UK).
  7. YaCy – A decentralized, open source, peer-to-peer search engine.
  8. Givero – Based in Denmark, Givero offers more privacy than Google and combines search with charitable donations.
  9. Ecosia – Ecosia is based in Germany and donates a part of revenues to planting trees.
*Note: With the exception of Mojeek, all of the private search engines above are technically metasearch engines, since they source their results from other search engines, such as Bing and Google.
(Startpage is no longer recommended.)

Gmail alternatives

Gmail may be convenient and popular, but there are three major problems:
  1. Your inbox is used as a data collection tool. (Did you know Google is tracking your purchasing history from the receipts in your inbox?)
  2. Rather than seeing just emails, your email inbox is also used for ads and marketing.
  3. The contents of your inbox are being shared with Google and other random third parties.
When you remain logged in to your Gmail account, Google can easily track your activities online as you browse different websites, which may be hosting Google Analytics or Google ads (Adsense).
Here are ten alternatives to Gmail that do well in terms of privacy:
  1. Tutanota – based in Germany; very secure and private; free accounts up to 1 GB
  2. Mailfence – based in Belgium; lots of features; free accounts up to 500 MB
  3. Posteo – based in Germany; €1/mo with 14 day refund window
  4. StartMail – based in Netherlands; $5.00/mo with 7 day free trial
  5. Runbox – based in Norway; lots of storage and features; $1.66/mo with 30 day free trial
  6. Mailbox.org – based in Germany; €1/mo with 30 day free trial
  7. CounterMail – based in Sweden; $4.00/mo with 7 day free trial
  8. Kolab Now – based in Switzerland; €4.41/mo with 30 day money-back guarantee
  9. ProtonMail – based in Switzerland; free accounts up to 500 MB
  10. Thexyz – based in Canada; $1.95/mo with 30 day refund window

Chrome alternatives

Google Chrome is a popular browser, but it’s also a data collection tool – and many people are taking notice. Just a few days ago, the Washington Post asserted that “Google’s web browser has become spy software,” with 11,000 tracker cookies observed in a single week.
Here are seven alternatives for more privacy:
  1. Firefox browser – Firefox is a very customizable, open-source browser that is popular in privacy circles. There are also many different Firefox modifications and tweaks that will give you more privacy and security. (Also check out Firefox Focus, a privacy-focused version for mobile users.)
  2. Iridium – Based on open source Chromium, Iridium offers numerous privacy and security enhancements over Chrome, source code here.
  3. GNU IceCat – A fork of Firefox from the Free Software Foundation.
  4. Tor browser – A hardened and secured version of Firefox that runs on the Tor network by default. (It also does a good job against browser fingerprinting.)
  5. Ungoogled Chromium – Just as the name says, this is an open source version of Chromium that has been “ungoogled” and modified for more privacy.
  6. Brave – Brave is another Chromium-based browser that is rather popular. It blocks trackers and ads by default (except for “approved” ads that are part of the “Brave Ads” network).
  7. Waterfox – This is a fork of Firefox that is configured for more privacy by default, with Mozilla telemetry stripped out of the code.
Of course, there are other alternatives to Chrome, such as Safari (from Apple), Microsoft Internet ExploreEdge, Opera, and Vivaldi – but these also come with some privacy drawbacks.

Google Drive alternatives

If you’re looking for a secure cloud storage option, you can check out these Google Drive alternatives:
  1. Tresorit – A user-friendly cloud storage option based in Switzerland.
  2. ownCloud – An open source and self-hosted cloud platform developed in Germany.
  3. Nextcloud – Nextcloud is also an open source, self-hosted file sharing and collaboration platform, based in Germany.
  4. Sync – Based in Canada, Sync offers a secure, encrypted cloud storage solution for businesses and individuals.
  5. Syncthing – Here we have a decentralized, open source, peer-to-peer cloud storage platform.
Of course, Dropbox is another popular Google drive alternative, but it’s not the best in terms of privacy.

Google Calendar alternative

Here are some Google Calendar alternatives:
  1. Lightning Calendar is an open source calendar option developed by Mozilla, and it’s compatible with Thunderbird and Seamonkey.
  2. Etar, an open source, basic calendar option.
  3. Fruux, an open source calendar with good features and support for many operating systems.
For those wanting a combined solution for both email and calendar functionality, these providers offer that:

Google Docs / Sheets / Slides alternative

There are many solid Google Docs alternatives available. The largest offline document editing suite is, of course, Microsoft Office. As most people know, however, Microsoft is not the best company for privacy. Nonetheless, there are a few other good Google Docs alternatives:
  1. CryptPad – CryptPad is a privacy-focused alternative with strong encryption, and it’s free.
  2. Etherpad – A self-hosted collaborative online editor that’s also open source.
  3. Mailfence Documents – From the Mailfence team, this is a secure file sharing, storage, and collaboration tool.
  4. Zoho Docs – This is another good Google Docs alternative with a clean interface and good functionality, although it may not be the best for privacy.
  5. OnlyOffice – OnlyOffice feels a bit more restricted than some of the other options in terms of features.
  6. Cryptee – This is a privacy-focused platform for photo and document storage and editing. It’s open source and based in Estonia.
  7. LibreOffice (offline) – You can use LibreOffice which is free and open source.
  8. Apache OpenOffice (offline) – Another good open source office suite.

Google Photos alternative

Here are a few good Google Photos alternatives:
Shoebox was another alternative, but it closed operations in June 2019.

YouTube alternatives

Unfortunately, YouTube alternatives can really be hit or miss, with most struggling to gain popularity.
  1. Peertube
  2. DTube
  3. Bitchute
  4. invidio.us
  5. Vimeo
  6. Bit.tube
  7. Dailymotion
  8. Hooktube
Tip: Invidio.us is a great Youtube proxy that allows you to watch any Youtube video without logging in, even if the video is somehow restricted. To do this, simply replace [www.youtube.com] with [invidio.us] in the URL you want to view.

Google translate alternative

Here are a few Google translate alternatives I have come across:
  1. DeepL – DeepL is a solid Google Translate alternative that seems to give great results. Like Google Translate, DeepL allows you to post up to 5,000 characters at a time (but the pro version is unlimited). The user interface is good and there is also a built-in dictionary feature.
  2. Linguee – Linguee does not allow you to post large blocks of text like DeepL. However, Linguee will give you very accurate translations for single words or phrases, along with context examples.
  3. dict.cc – This Google Translate alternative seems to do a decent job on single-world lookups, but it also feels a bit outdated.
  4. Swisscows Translate – A good translation service supporting many languages.
If you want to translate blocks of text, check out DeepL. If you want in-depth translations for single words or phrases, then Linguee is a good choice.

Google analytics alternative

For website admins, there are many reasons to use an alternative to Google analytics. Aside from privacy concerns, there are also faster and more user-friendly alternatives that also respect your visitors’ privacy.
  1. Clicky is a great alternative to Google Analytics that truncates and anonymizes visitor IP addresses by default. It is lightweight, user-friendly, and fully compliant with GDPR regulations, while also being certified by Privacy Shield.
  2. Matomo (formerly Piwik) is an open-source analytics platform that respects the privacy of visitors by anonymizing and truncating visitor IP addresses (if enabled by the website admin). It is also certified to respect user privacy.
  3. Fathom Analytics is an open source alternative to Google Analytics that’s available on Github here. It’s minimal, fast, and lightweight.
  4. Get Insights – Another privacy-focused analytics platform, with a full analytics suite. The front-end client is open source and available here.
  5. AT Internet is a France-based analytics provider that is fully GDPR compliant, with all data stored on French servers, and a good track record going back to 1996.
Many websites host Google Analytics because they run Google Adsense campaigns. Without Google Analytics, tracking performance of these campaigns would be difficult. Nonetheless, there are still better options for privacy.

Google Maps alternative

A map alternative for PCs is OpenStreetMap.
A few Google Maps alternatives for mobile devices include:
  1. OsmAnd is a free and open-source mobile maps app for both Android and iOS (based on OpenStreetMap data).
  2. Maps (F Droid) uses OpenStreetMap data (offline).
  3. Maps.Me is another option that is free on both Android and iOS, but there is a fair amount of data collection with this alternative, as explained in their privacy policy.
  4. MapHub is also based on OpenStreeMap data and it does not collect locations or user IP addresses.
Note: Waze is not an “alternative” as it is now owned by Google.

Google Play Store alternative

Currently the best Google Play Store alternative is to use F-Droid and then go through the Yalp store. As explained on the official site, F-Droid is an installable catalog of FOSS (Free and Open Source Software) applications for the Android platform.
After you have installed F-Droid, you can then download the Yalp store APK, which allows you to download apps from the Google Play Store directly as APK files.
📷The Yalp Store is a good alternative to the Google Play Store.
See the F-Droid website or the official GitHub page for more info. Other alternatives to the Google Play Store include:

Google Chrome OS alternative

Want to ditch the Chromebook and Chrome OS? Here are a few alternatives:
  1. Linux – Of course, Linux is arguably the best alternative, being a free, open-source operating system with lots of different flavors. With some adjustments, Linux Ubuntu can be run on Chromebooks.
  2. Tails – Tails is a free, privacy-focused operating system based on Linux that routes all traffic through the Tor network.
  3. QubesOS – Recommended by Snowden, free, and also open source.
Of course, the other two big operating system alternatives are Windows and Apple’s operating system for MacBooks – Mac OS. Windows, particularly Windows 10, is a very bad option for privacy. While slightly better, Apple also collects user data and has partnered with the NSA) for surveillance.

Android alternatives

The biggest alternative to Android is iOS from Apple. But we’ll skip over that for reasons already mentioned. Here are a few Android OS alternatives:
  1. LineageOS – A free and open-source operating system for phones and tablets based on Android.
  2. Ubuntu Touch – A mobile version of the Ubuntu operating system.
  3. Plasma Mobile – An open source, Linux-based operating system with active development.
  4. Sailfish OS – Another open source, Linux-based mobile OS.
  5. Replicant – A fully free Android distribution with an emphasis on freedom, privacy, and security.
  6. /e/ – This is another open source project with a focus on privacy and security.
Purism is also working on a privacy-focused mobile phone called the Librem 5. It is in production, but not yet available (estimated Q3 2019).

Google Hangouts alternatives

Here are some alternatives to Google Hangouts:
  1. Wire – A great all-around secure messenger, video, and chat app, but somewhat limited on the number of people who can chat together in a group conversation via voice or video.
  2. Signal – A good secure messenger platform from Open Whisper Systems.
  3. Telegram – A longtime secure messenger app, formerly based in Russia, now in Dubai.
  4. Riot – A privacy-focused encrypted chat service that is also open source.

Google Domains alternative

Google Domains is a domain registration service. Here are a few alternatives:
  1. Namecheap – I like Namecheap because all domain purchases now come with free WhoisGuard protection for life, which protects your contact information from third parties. Namecheap also accepts Bitcoin and offers domain registration, hosting, email, SSL certs, and a variety of other products.
  2. Njalla – Njalla is a privacy-focused domain registration service based in Nevis. They offer hosting options, too, and also accept cryptocurrency payments.
  3. OrangeWebsite – OrangeWebsite offers anonymous domain registration services and also accepts cryptocurrency payments, based in Iceland.

Other Google alternatives

Here more alternatives for various Google products:
Google forms alternativeJotForm is a free online form builder.
Google Keep alternative – Below are a few different Google Keep alternatives:
Google Fonts alternative – Many websites load Google fonts through Google APIs, but that’s not necessary. One alternative to this is to use Font Squirrel, which has a large selection of both Google and non-Google fonts which are free to download and use.
Google Voice alternativeJMP.chat (both free and paid)
G Suite alternativeZoho is probably the best option
Google Firebase alternativeKuzzle (free and open source)
Google Blogger alternativesWordPress, Medium, and Ghost are all good options.
submitted by giganticcobra to privacytoolsIO [link] [comments]

huge list of google alternatives tutorial for those people who respects their privacy

This guide aims to be the most exhaustive resource available for documenting alternatives to Google products.
With growing concerns over online privacy and securing personal data, more people than ever are considering alternatives to Google products.
After all, Google’s business model essentially revolves around data collection and advertisements, both of which infringe on your privacy. More data means better (targeted) ads and more revenue. The company pulled in over $116 billion in ad revenue last year alone – and that number continues to grow.
But the word is getting out. A growing number of people are seeking alternatives to Google products that respect their privacy and data.
So let’s get started.
Note: The lists below are not necessarily in rank order. Choose the best products and services based on your own unique needs.

Google search alternatives

When it comes to privacy, using Google search is not a good idea. When you use their search engine, Google is recording your IP address, search terms, user agent, and often a unique identifier, which is stored in cookies.
Here are ten alternatives to Google search:
  1. Searx – A privacy-friendly and versatile metasearch engine that’s also open source.
  2. MetaGer – An open source metasearch engine with good features, based in Germany.
  3. SwissCows – A zero-tracking private search engine based in Switzerland, hosted on secure Swiss infrastructure.
  4. Qwant – A private search engine based in France.
  5. DuckDuckGo – A private search engine based in the US.
  6. Mojeek – The only true search engine (rather than metasearch engine) that has its own crawler and index (based in the UK).
  7. YaCy – A decentralized, open source, peer-to-peer search engine.
  8. Givero – Based in Denmark, Givero offers more privacy than Google and combines search with charitable donations.
  9. Ecosia – Ecosia is based in Germany and donates a part of revenues to planting trees.
*Note: With the exception of Mojeek, all of the private search engines above are technically metasearch engines, since they source their results from other search engines, such as Bing and Google.
(Startpage is no longer recommended.)

Gmail alternatives

Gmail may be convenient and popular, but there are three major problems:
  1. Your inbox is used as a data collection tool. (Did you know Google is tracking your purchasing history from the receipts in your inbox?)
  2. Rather than seeing just emails, your email inbox is also used for ads and marketing.
  3. The contents of your inbox are being shared with Google and other random third parties.
When you remain logged in to your Gmail account, Google can easily track your activities online as you browse different websites, which may be hosting Google Analytics or Google ads (Adsense).
Here are ten alternatives to Gmail that do well in terms of privacy:
  1. Tutanota – based in Germany; very secure and private; free accounts up to 1 GB
  2. Mailfence – based in Belgium; lots of features; free accounts up to 500 MB
  3. Posteo – based in Germany; €1/mo with 14 day refund window
  4. StartMail – based in Netherlands; $5.00/mo with 7 day free trial
  5. Runbox – based in Norway; lots of storage and features; $1.66/mo with 30 day free trial
  6. Mailbox.org – based in Germany; €1/mo with 30 day free trial
  7. CounterMail – based in Sweden; $4.00/mo with 7 day free trial
  8. Kolab Now – based in Switzerland; €4.41/mo with 30 day money-back guarantee
  9. ProtonMail – based in Switzerland; free accounts up to 500 MB
  10. Thexyz – based in Canada; $1.95/mo with 30 day refund window

Chrome alternatives

Google Chrome is a popular browser, but it’s also a data collection tool – and many people are taking notice. Just a few days ago, the Washington Post asserted that “Google’s web browser has become spy software,” with 11,000 tracker cookies observed in a single week.
Here are seven alternatives for more privacy:
  1. Firefox browser – Firefox is a very customizable, open-source browser that is popular in privacy circles. There are also many different Firefox modifications and tweaks that will give you more privacy and security. (Also check out Firefox Focus, a privacy-focused version for mobile users.)
  2. Iridium – Based on open source Chromium, Iridium offers numerous privacy and security enhancements over Chrome, source code here.
  3. GNU IceCat – A fork of Firefox from the Free Software Foundation.
  4. Tor browser – A hardened and secured version of Firefox that runs on the Tor network by default. (It also does a good job against browser fingerprinting.)
  5. Ungoogled Chromium – Just as the name says, this is an open source version of Chromium that has been “ungoogled” and modified for more privacy.
  6. Brave – Brave is another Chromium-based browser that is rather popular. It blocks trackers and ads by default (except for “approved” ads that are part of the “Brave Ads” network).
  7. Waterfox – This is a fork of Firefox that is configured for more privacy by default, with Mozilla telemetry stripped out of the code.
Of course, there are other alternatives to Chrome, such as Safari (from Apple), Microsoft Internet ExploreEdge, Opera, and Vivaldi – but these also come with some privacy drawbacks.

Google Drive alternatives

If you’re looking for a secure cloud storage option, you can check out these Google Drive alternatives:
  1. Tresorit – A user-friendly cloud storage option based in Switzerland.
  2. ownCloud – An open source and self-hosted cloud platform developed in Germany.
  3. Nextcloud – Nextcloud is also an open source, self-hosted file sharing and collaboration platform, based in Germany.
  4. Sync – Based in Canada, Sync offers a secure, encrypted cloud storage solution for businesses and individuals.
  5. Syncthing – Here we have a decentralized, open source, peer-to-peer cloud storage platform.
Of course, Dropbox is another popular Google drive alternative, but it’s not the best in terms of privacy.

Google Calendar alternative

Here are some Google Calendar alternatives:
  1. Lightning Calendar is an open source calendar option developed by Mozilla, and it’s compatible with Thunderbird and Seamonkey.
  2. Etar, an open source, basic calendar option.
  3. Fruux, an open source calendar with good features and support for many operating systems.
For those wanting a combined solution for both email and calendar functionality, these providers offer that:

Google Docs / Sheets / Slides alternative

There are many solid Google Docs alternatives available. The largest offline document editing suite is, of course, Microsoft Office. As most people know, however, Microsoft is not the best company for privacy. Nonetheless, there are a few other good Google Docs alternatives:
  1. CryptPad – CryptPad is a privacy-focused alternative with strong encryption, and it’s free.
  2. Etherpad – A self-hosted collaborative online editor that’s also open source.
  3. Mailfence Documents – From the Mailfence team, this is a secure file sharing, storage, and collaboration tool.
  4. Zoho Docs – This is another good Google Docs alternative with a clean interface and good functionality, although it may not be the best for privacy.
  5. OnlyOffice – OnlyOffice feels a bit more restricted than some of the other options in terms of features.
  6. Cryptee – This is a privacy-focused platform for photo and document storage and editing. It’s open source and based in Estonia.
  7. LibreOffice (offline) – You can use LibreOffice which is free and open source.
  8. Apache OpenOffice (offline) – Another good open source office suite.

Google Photos alternative

Here are a few good Google Photos alternatives:
Shoebox was another alternative, but it closed operations in June 2019.

YouTube alternatives

Unfortunately, YouTube alternatives can really be hit or miss, with most struggling to gain popularity.
  1. Peertube
  2. DTube
  3. Bitchute
  4. invidio.us
  5. Vimeo
  6. Bit.tube
  7. Dailymotion
  8. Hooktube
Tip: Invidio.us is a great Youtube proxy that allows you to watch any Youtube video without logging in, even if the video is somehow restricted. To do this, simply replace [www.youtube.com] with [invidio.us] in the URL you want to view.

Google translate alternative

Here are a few Google translate alternatives I have come across:
  1. DeepL – DeepL is a solid Google Translate alternative that seems to give great results. Like Google Translate, DeepL allows you to post up to 5,000 characters at a time (but the pro version is unlimited). The user interface is good and there is also a built-in dictionary feature.
  2. Linguee – Linguee does not allow you to post large blocks of text like DeepL. However, Linguee will give you very accurate translations for single words or phrases, along with context examples.
  3. dict.cc – This Google Translate alternative seems to do a decent job on single-world lookups, but it also feels a bit outdated.
  4. Swisscows Translate – A good translation service supporting many languages.
If you want to translate blocks of text, check out DeepL. If you want in-depth translations for single words or phrases, then Linguee is a good choice.

Google analytics alternative

For website admins, there are many reasons to use an alternative to Google analytics. Aside from privacy concerns, there are also faster and more user-friendly alternatives that also respect your visitors’ privacy.
  1. Clicky is a great alternative to Google Analytics that truncates and anonymizes visitor IP addresses by default. It is lightweight, user-friendly, and fully compliant with GDPR regulations, while also being certified by Privacy Shield.
  2. Matomo (formerly Piwik) is an open-source analytics platform that respects the privacy of visitors by anonymizing and truncating visitor IP addresses (if enabled by the website admin). It is also certified to respect user privacy.
  3. Fathom Analytics is an open source alternative to Google Analytics that’s available on Github here. It’s minimal, fast, and lightweight.
  4. Get Insights – Another privacy-focused analytics platform, with a full analytics suite. The front-end client is open source and available here.
  5. AT Internet is a France-based analytics provider that is fully GDPR compliant, with all data stored on French servers, and a good track record going back to 1996.
Many websites host Google Analytics because they run Google Adsense campaigns. Without Google Analytics, tracking performance of these campaigns would be difficult. Nonetheless, there are still better options for privacy.

Google Maps alternative

A map alternative for PCs is OpenStreetMap.
A few Google Maps alternatives for mobile devices include:
  1. OsmAnd is a free and open-source mobile maps app for both Android and iOS (based on OpenStreetMap data).
  2. Maps (F Droid) uses OpenStreetMap data (offline).
  3. Maps.Me is another option that is free on both Android and iOS, but there is a fair amount of data collection with this alternative, as explained in their privacy policy.
  4. MapHub is also based on OpenStreeMap data and it does not collect locations or user IP addresses.
Note: Waze is not an “alternative” as it is now owned by Google.

Google Play Store alternative

Currently the best Google Play Store alternative is to use F-Droid and then go through the Yalp store. As explained on the official site, F-Droid is an installable catalog of FOSS (Free and Open Source Software) applications for the Android platform.
After you have installed F-Droid, you can then download the Yalp store APK, which allows you to download apps from the Google Play Store directly as APK files.
📷The Yalp Store is a good alternative to the Google Play Store.
See the F-Droid website or the official GitHub page for more info. Other alternatives to the Google Play Store include:

Google Chrome OS alternative

Want to ditch the Chromebook and Chrome OS? Here are a few alternatives:
  1. Linux – Of course, Linux is arguably the best alternative, being a free, open-source operating system with lots of different flavors. With some adjustments, Linux Ubuntu can be run on Chromebooks.
  2. Tails – Tails is a free, privacy-focused operating system based on Linux that routes all traffic through the Tor network.
  3. QubesOS – Recommended by Snowden, free, and also open source.
Of course, the other two big operating system alternatives are Windows and Apple’s operating system for MacBooks – Mac OS. Windows, particularly Windows 10, is a very bad option for privacy. While slightly better, Apple also collects user data and has partnered with the NSA) for surveillance.

Android alternatives

The biggest alternative to Android is iOS from Apple. But we’ll skip over that for reasons already mentioned. Here are a few Android OS alternatives:
  1. LineageOS – A free and open-source operating system for phones and tablets based on Android.
  2. Ubuntu Touch – A mobile version of the Ubuntu operating system.
  3. Plasma Mobile – An open source, Linux-based operating system with active development.
  4. Sailfish OS – Another open source, Linux-based mobile OS.
  5. Replicant – A fully free Android distribution with an emphasis on freedom, privacy, and security.
  6. /e/ – This is another open source project with a focus on privacy and security.
Purism is also working on a privacy-focused mobile phone called the Librem 5. It is in production, but not yet available (estimated Q3 2019).

Google Hangouts alternatives

Here are some alternatives to Google Hangouts:
  1. Wire – A great all-around secure messenger, video, and chat app, but somewhat limited on the number of people who can chat together in a group conversation via voice or video.
  2. Signal – A good secure messenger platform from Open Whisper Systems.
  3. Telegram – A longtime secure messenger app, formerly based in Russia, now in Dubai.
  4. Riot – A privacy-focused encrypted chat service that is also open source.

Google Domains alternative

Google Domains is a domain registration service. Here are a few alternatives:
  1. Namecheap – I like Namecheap because all domain purchases now come with free WhoisGuard protection for life, which protects your contact information from third parties. Namecheap also accepts Bitcoin and offers domain registration, hosting, email, SSL certs, and a variety of other products.
  2. Njalla – Njalla is a privacy-focused domain registration service based in Nevis. They offer hosting options, too, and also accept cryptocurrency payments.
  3. OrangeWebsite – OrangeWebsite offers anonymous domain registration services and also accepts cryptocurrency payments, based in Iceland.

Other Google alternatives

Here more alternatives for various Google products:
Google forms alternativeJotForm is a free online form builder.
Google Keep alternative – Below are a few different Google Keep alternatives:
Google Fonts alternative – Many websites load Google fonts through Google APIs, but that’s not necessary. One alternative to this is to use Font Squirrel, which has a large selection of both Google and non-Google fonts which are free to download and use.
Google Voice alternativeJMP.chat (both free and paid)
G Suite alternativeZoho is probably the best option
Google Firebase alternativeKuzzle (free and open source)
Google Blogger alternativesWordPress, Medium, and Ghost are all good options.
submitted by giganticcobra to Huawei [link] [comments]

Help with Dell XPS 13 2 in 1 9365 (I think), $50 reward. Not able to access boot menu

If you can provide a solution to this problem, I will pay you $50 in Bitcoin or PayPal.
So for whatever reason I am not able to access the boot menu on my Dell XPS 13 device, I do have the 2 in 1 tablet version so I'm pretty sure it's the 9365. Whenever I turn the device on, I see the Dell logo on the screen and shortly after, it goes to another screen where it says my computer has a 238 gb Toshiba SSD (it does) and that "Dell NVMe rom successfully installed". Not sure what this means. If I try to access the boot menu through either F12 or F2, it shows the text in the upper right corner of the screen, and the small blue loading bar at the bottom of the screen, but after the bar is roughly 1/3 of the way through, the screen goes black and it goes to the screen with the NVMe stuff. After either of these cases, the screen remains black (but on) and the keyboard backlight is on. Here are some things that I think are relevant to anyone trying to solve this problem:
-I had previously been running a grub dual boot to Windows 10 Signature Edition and Ubuntu 17.04
-I had changed the SATA SSD settings, from the (I believe) default RAID to AHCI, which is what you have to do for dual boot. I'm pretty sure this is what I did, but I have no way to check
-Everything had been working fine until today when I rebooted my computer, went into the F12 boot menu, and turned off the Safe Boot option. After rebooting from this, I encountered the issue and have not been able to resolve it since.
-(Edit): If I attempt to turn it on, then wait about 5 minutes, the screen eventually shows the Dell logo again, with "F12 Boot Options" in the upper right corner, but this is static and nothing happens after pressing F12.
If anyone wants pictures or a video of the computer attempting to boot up or turning on, I can provide those (but not until about 6 pm Eastern today)
Any help would be greatly appreciated
[SOLVED] Alright, it's fixed, but I really have no clue how. What I did to "fix" it, was, turn the computer completely off, switch it on, then press F2 really fast while it's booting up. I encountered the same issue that I had before, but this time, instead of turning it off, I just closed the lid (to post the comment about it not working). When I opened the computer back up, I was in the BIOS menu. I re-enabled Safe Boot (last time I'm going to be screwing with that), and rebooted the computer. It failed to boot once, not even displaying the Dell logo, but the second time it booted up just fine, like before I'd even turned Safe Boot off.
submitted by Money8991 to Dell [link] [comments]

Bitcoin, a ~~store~~ storage of value

Last Saturday I had all of my 'computers' stolen...
With my 'computers' I mean my windows 8 laptop, android tablet and ubuntu notebook.
Well... I mean all of the 'screens' I use to access my bitcoin.
Ultimately, very simple.
I bought a new tablet, installed Mycelium.
And...
I had a backup to the Mycelium Wallet. I had my encrypted private key sent to a good friend. I had the pass for the private key written down on paper.
Installed the wallet, scanned the private key, inserted the password.
Sent a dollar worth of bitcoin to my girlfriend's wallet just to make sure all is working.
No worries, all good.
Cheers to mycelium!
I am looking forward to receiving the Mycelium Entropy so to take things to the next level.
Cheers to the bitcoin technology!
Now that's what I call a store storage of value.
Bitcoin, just use it.
Edit: Reddit formatting help doesn't seem to work in titles. Did not know that...
submitted by MonetaryFew to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Offline Hardware Wallet Options Ranked

Hello bitcoiners,
I just purchased 0.10506 worth of bitcoin and which is sitting in CoinJar (an Australian online wallet company). I have two factor authentication. Is it okay to have such a small amount online?
As I increase the amount of bitcoin I own, I would obviously want to store them securely in an offline hardware wallet. What are my best options out of the following?
I understand the best option would be to use another computer running Ubuntu/Linux that has never been connected to the internet but I would rather not drop $500AUD on a new computer.
Cheers!
submitted by upallnighttog3tlucky to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

[Table] IAmA Ubuntu Community Manager at Canonical, author/speaker on Community Management and best practice, and play in metal band Severed Fifth

Verified? (This bot cannot verify AMAs just yet)
Date: 2012-06-05
Link to submission (Has self-text)
Link to my post
Questions Answers
Not sure if any of this is really your job descriptions, but they're the questions I have about Ubuntu anyway. I believe the criticism around Unity could be divided into two broad categories (1) fear of change and (2) critcism about the design/stability of Unity. Back when we originally released Unity into Ubuntu, there was a lot of (1) and some (2). With Ubuntu 12.04 there is a little (1) and not much (2). Unity in 12.04 is significantly faster, better designed, and better executed and I most of the responses I have seen to 12.04 have been praising Unity.
How are you and the rest of Canonical dealing with all of the criticisms of Unity? How are you and the rest of Canonical dealing with all of the criticisms of Unity?
What's the process of implementing Ubuntu for Android like? What do you expect the response to it to be, and how are device manufacturers responding to it? Is Canonical trying to become the Apple of Linux? What other strategies are you implementing to help Linux go mainstream? In terms of fear of change, there will always be some folks who don't like it: that is fine; we have many wonderful options for desktops in Ubuntu. Some folks though feel like we are "dumbing down Linux"; I thoroughly disagree with that notion. Linux should be for everyone, not just Linux geeks, and we want Ubuntu to bring Free Software to everyone, not just a fiefdom populated by those with significant technical skills. What's the process of implementing Ubuntu for Android like? What do you expect the response to it to be, and how are device manufacturers responding to it? Is Canonical trying to become the Apple of Linux? What other strategies are you implementing to help Linux go mainstream?
Can we please get an easier RAID implementation on the desktop flavor Ubuntu? Can we please get an easier RAID implementation on the desktop flavor Ubuntu?
I believe the criticism around Unity could be divided into two broad categories (1) fear of change and (2) critcism about the design/stability of Unity. "I fear Canonical hasn't been listening to the specific concerns of its community when it comes to Unity in particular. It's not that I'm afraid of change, or that it's unstable, it's that it's ugly, unwieldy to use, and non-configurable. The lack of control and configuration coupled with the fact it's been forced down our throats is what really seems to irk the community".
Some folks though feel like we are "dumbing down Linux"; I thoroughly disagree with that notion. Linux should be for everyone, not just Linux geeks. Also, nothing has been "forced down your throat": this is Free Software and you are free to use something else.
Ubuntu, as it stands, is near unusable for a lot of power users who do heavy development work and constantly need to switch applications - and it's 100% because of Unity and "simplifying" the distro. I'll personally be sticking to Debian until this regression goes away. I would consider myself a power user, I am regularly switching applications and it works fine. But here's the thing: this is all personal opinion. It works well for me, perfect! It doesn't work well for you, well you can either help us fix it or use something else. Perfect! Either way, we all get to use Free Software. :-)
Edit: Er, it looks like pseudolobster hit my concern already. Carry on.
Sure, maybe it's time for Ubuntu to move on and try this really ambitious move to dumb down linux for old people, alienating its previous userbase, but it's a damn shame because I used to really like Ubuntu. "Sure, maybe it's time for Ubuntu to move on and try this really ambitious move to dumb down linux for old people, alienating its previous userbase, but it's a damn shame because I used to really like Ubuntu". I always hate to see the term "dumbing down" because it is exclusionary: Ubuntu is for everyone...not just for people with a certain level of expertise. The difference is...for a novice user, they require simple defaults otherwise we lose them, a more technically savvy can dive below the surface and install additional configurability.
Are you still actively trying to push Ubuntu to Android manufacturers/developers? If so, have any responded with any interest? Yes, the convergent device (Ubuntu on Android) is a key area of focus. Canonical engineers have been continuing to build it out and our business team has been working with various handset makers to sign agreements. I believe there are a few deals underway.
Also, any chance that private developers (Cyanogenmod/MIUI/AOKP/AOSP) will get a chance to bake Ubuntu into custom ROMs? As for people taking it and baking it into custom ROMs, I don't see why this couldn't happen in the future. It is unlikely to be one of our standard releases as most people don't install new OSs on their phones, but I am sure the software will be available for integration some time.
You know me in real life, although not by this username. I install a new OS on my phone regularly...so, you know at least one. ;-) Hrm... :-)
How did the Humble Bundle thing go? We're they/Ubuntu receptive and it all went smoothly? Any chance of getting the back catalog into the software center? The Humble Indie Bundle release has gone really well. We had nearly 10000 downloads in 72 hours, and the downloads are continuing. A number of previous games are in the Ubuntu Software Center and we are working on others too.
Also any chance to standardizing a set of libraries for game development in Ubuntu, kind of like what ya'll did for Gtk apps and Quickly? As for Quickly and game development: I would love to see that, we just need a community member to contribute to this. If you (or someone else) wants to help, I would be happy to help you get connected to the right person.
Does this mean that you plan to allow us to link games from previous bundles that are in the software center to our account? I would like to be able to link my purchase of World of Good, Braid, Bittrip runner, and probably othes so that I can more easily download and install them. I think that would be the optimal option.
On a non "I h8 unity" tangent, gaming (and Netflix, to an extent) is a big part of the reason I'm still on Windows some of the time. Are you excited that Steam is coming to Linux? What are the major hurdles, in your opinion, to a better gaming experience on Linux? I am stoked about Steam coming to Linux. The challenge will be hardware support for some graphics cards (most work great), but I suspect that Steam on Linux will apply pressure to the card makers.
What do you see as the future of the music industry? Big, professional, signed artists with major labels.
Newer artists with smaller labels, still probably working part time.
For the big artists, the traditional music industry (make music, sell it, go on tour, sell overpriced merch and tickets etc) works well. This is because for these artists the music companies work like VCs: they put lots of money into different projects and every so often they get a Justin Bieber.
For smaller artists, they are typically working with small labels with barely any marketing budget. This means they sign their value (their music) to a label who often doesn't have the resources to bring the artist up to a higher level.
I believe that for smaller artists, the Creative Commons is the way to go. We did this with Severed Fifth: we grew a community, raised $5000 in funding to record our album, and gave it away for free so others can use it. Our music has appeared in all kinds of music videos on YouTube, in games and elsewhere.
The challenge is for smaller artists who work full time on their music. For weekend warriors like me, money is not that of a deal as I have a job, so giving music away for free is fine. If you are relying on getting paid at a show and need to sell that merch, giving away your music is a big deal, so I understand how some folks are resistant to it.
What type of communication is there between Ubuntu/Canonical and the major PC game developers in regards to promoting more native Linux/.deb version of games? We have a team of people at Canonical who are regularly reaching out to games publishers (e.g. EA) to encourage them to bring their technology to Ubuntu.
I want to develop Free Software and make money out of it. What business models do you suggest so that it can be profitable ? Here are a few models I can think of : make the source available but sell the packaged program ; make the software rely on a service that is not free ; donations ; create closed-source add-ons ; etc. What are your ideas about it, Jono ? Sell it in the Ubuntu Software Center.
Have a donations page on your website.
Sell additional services or materials such as training books, audiobooks, etc.
I think this could make the good stuff happen. :-)
I've been interested in implementing an open source alternative to high end audio studio's software. Has there been any dialog with big publishers (like Steinberg, Avid, Propellerhead, etc) about getting their DAWs crossed over to Linux? Is there any open source project related to audio that has been getting your attention?
Do you see Ubuntu and open software making their move into professional studios? Do you see Ubuntu and open software making their move into professional studios?
Is there any kind of obstacles that open source audio development has faced these this last decade? Is there any open source project related to audio that has been getting your attention? Is there any kind of obstacles that open source audio development has faced these this last decade?
Has there been any dialog with big publishers (like Steinberg, Avid, Propellerhead, etc) about getting their DAWs crossed over to Linux?
Thank you for the answer. :D May the Linux desktop live long and prosper. :) Live long and prosper! :-)
Want to sort me out a summer intern position in your London office? What's that, you do? You're too kind. I am not currently taking any interns. Sorry!
What would be in your opinion the improvements Ubuntu brings to the table compared to other OS (Windows, Mac OS or even Android). Better range of pre-installed software for most users.
What Linux distribution are you running? (Ubuntu?) Secure and virus free experience.
Do you think that major companies feel threatened/insecure with open software, and that is why ATI/nVidia are reluctant to release the libraries for Linux? (at least this was a pain in the ass when I tryed getting the right drivers for my video and sound cards) Free and open, and with a commitment to five years of free security updates for LTSs.
What is your favourite game from the range 2010~2012? Sleek, simple, and elegant user experience.
What is your favorite pokemon? Passionate and friendly community.
Wide range of software in the Ubuntu Software Center.
Strong developer platform.
Etc....
Ubuntu 12.04 for another few weeks until I upgrade to 12.10dev.
I don't think they fear it, I think they just can't justify the investment until they feel the market is bigger.
Not really sure, I am not really a big gamer. :-)
I am not into Pokemon. :-)
Hello, I currently have a home Ubuntu 10.04 server, and I use Lubuntu 12.04 on my Desktop, love them both. I think flavors and derivatives are awesome, and we are very supportive of them. Part of the reason we divide up Ubuntu engineering into Kernel, Foundations, and Desktop is to ensure that the Kernel and Foundations output can be useful for flavors and derivatives too.
I am wondering about what you think about all of the distros that are based on Ubuntu, such as Mint and Pinguy. Does it annoy you that people are moving over to these Ubuntu spinoff's? Or is this just something you expect due to working in the linux community? Our goal here is to build a powerful Free Software platform, and encouraging others to create flavors and derivs is a great feature in building that platform.
What does your job entail as a Community Manager? What does your job entail as a Community Manager? My job is divided into a few different areas. Firstly I build strategy around where we need to build growth and focus on our community (e.g. most recently a strong strategic focus is app developers). Secondly, I manage a team of five community managers who work on different areas (Daniel Holbach (developers), David Planella (app devs / translations), Jorge Castro (cloud), Michael Hall (app devs and upstreams), and Nicholas Skaggs (QA)). Thirdly, I work to ensure Canonical staff members are working with the community and that the values and needs of the community are well served. Finally, I work directly with the community to resolve issues, focus on certain areas, and respond to questions from the community and press.
How often/how long do you spend doing things related to your job? How often/how long do you spend doing things related to your job?
What are your top 5 favourite bands? What are your top 5 favourite bands?
canonical seems to have plowed its own furrow in a number of places: it adopted bzr, then git owned the world. It developed launchpad, but everyone went to github. It threw its lot in with eucalyptus, and then jumped horse to openstack. These examples, upstart, storm, etc. - in general, the open source contributions canonical makes tend to be less than successful compared with other companies. is it bad at managing open source projects, or just bad at marketing them? Each of the technologies you highlighted have been successful, but not neccessarily the most popular. In technology I don't think popularity neccessarily means success. As an example, bzr serves our community really well, so does Launchpad, but I agree it has seen limited wider success. I think Canonical manages Open Source projects well...Ubuntu has been very successful, but I think it boils down to what people want...people want Ubuntu, but in many cases people want git instead of bzr.
i think a few years ago, shuttleworth was saying that canonical was not yet breaking even, but would do - by 2008, then 2010. since then it has started even more projects, in even more markets, hired even more people - presumably that goal is still a ways away. do you look forward to the day when canonical doesn't need to rely on largesse? I am glad we are continuing to invest: we have big, hairy, goals. To achieve them we need growth, focus, and strong teams, and I think we have these. We will break even, but this is a game that needs a lot of upfront investment and passionate people.
Will there be a Bitcoin wallet provided in the Software Center soon? If someone submits it for inclusion then yes! :-)
If anyone is reading this and they have made a wallet, find out how to submit it at Link to developer.ubuntu.com
What's your favorite app in the Software Center? My fave app is the GIMP.
Have you ever met Mark Shuttleworth? Indeed, he was over at my house for a BBQ a few weeks ago.
How is he? I have worked with him since I joined Canonical. He is a cool guy, very technically savvy, with a strong vision, and a strong loyalty to people who are loyal to him. He is very passionate about the community and sits on our Community Council and Technical Board and often gets involved in community matters.
Have you ever negotiated with Valve for bringing steam to Ubuntu/Linux? There has been some discussions.
Any chance of another LugRadio reunion show anytime soon? I've re-played the Devil's Drink segment about a hundred times, still always manages to make me laugh. I would love to do another LugRadio show. We just need to figure out a way of getting the team together, which mainly involved me getting to England to record a show. Maybe we could try a G+ thing sometime. :-)
The accomplishments system is a pretty cool play on the gameification theme, but it is very Ubuntu based. Is there a plan for supporting accomplishments that are totally unrelated to Ubuntu and computing? Absolutely! Right now it is very Ubuntu centric as we are building for what we know, but the system supports accomplishments from other projects too. If someone wants to build an Accomplishments Collection for Fedora, FreeBSD, or whatever, the system supports it. You can read more about creating accomplishments at Link to wiki.ubuntu.com
The only piece of the core system that is very Ubuntu specific is that it uses Ubuntu One. If someone wants to submit a branch to support other backends we would be happy to review. :-)
Jono, what was the fate of Ubuntu's "Four Horsemen" since you guys hired a fifth member of the team? Are you guys now officially called the Five Horsemen? These are the questions that keep Ubuntu redditors awake at night. We are now the six horsemen. :-)
My Question is if the ubuntu developers are thinking in integrating this feature on future versions of Unity? My Question is if the ubuntu developers are thinking in integrating this feature on future versions of Unity?
I would pay to listen again Lugradio or Shot of Jaq and I don't think I'm the only one. Have you ever thought about making money with a podcast? I would pay to listen again Lugradio or Shot of Jaq and I don't think I'm the only one. Have you ever thought about making money with a podcast?
I guess you would love to see available on the Ubuntu Software Center mainstream popular games even if they have DRM and some other important applications like Photoshop, Autocad and etc... But if we fill the desktop with a lot of these things at the end what would be the difference between an Ubuntu desktop and a OSX desktop? Don't you think that open source should create open alternatives and try a different approach? I guess you would love to see available on the Ubuntu Software Center mainstream popular games even if they have DRM and some other important applications like Photoshop, Autocad and etc... But if we fill the desktop with a lot of these things at the end what would be the difference between an Ubuntu desktop and a OSX desktop? Don't you think that open source should create open alternatives and try a different approach?
Lets try again. Unity had terrible reviews. Why did Canonical not listen to their users about the introduction of this? You have to admit, it was a pretty bad reception. Canonical's response to this was similar to RIM's response about poor innovation, or the complete lack of it. They ignored it. That's better, thanks for presenting your question more politely.
When we introduced Unity we knew that chunks of it needed more sheening and refinement. What was important to us was to ensure that Unity was in good shape for Ubuntu 12.04, our next LTS, this is why we dropped in a few releases early to give our users a chance to play with it, share their experiences, share their concerns, and give us a chance to fix these outstanding problems.
Now, as you say, some folks were not happy with Unity. I think part of this was that those early Unity releases has a pretty tiny amount of QA applied: they were crashy, and when Unity crashed, it would take compiz down with it too. To remedy this we built an automated testing lab, and hired someone on my team to build a community of manual testers. I think most would agree that the Unity in 12.04 is much higher quality.
When we introduced Unity originally some folks just didn't like the design. This is always tough: design is emotional, and so is change, so a change with a new design is really emotional. Now some of the feedback at this time was constructive: it highlighted specific deficiencies in the design, problems in the implementation and other things. The design and engineering teams read all of this feedback with interest and reacted to much of it in future releases.
Some folks just didn't like Unity for the fact it was "different" and "why didn't you guys just keep shipping GNOME 2". For us to bring Free Software to more and more people we need to constantly evolve, and Unity was a step along that evolution. We have expanded our target demographic to not just Linux enthusiasts but general consumers too, and we found that GNOME 2 did not serve general consumers as well...as such Unity was designed to bridge that gap.
Now, of course, Unity is not perfect. There is still lots of work to be done, and many improvements to be made, but I think we are on the right track.
One thing I can assure you is that Canonical did not ignore this feedback: quite the opposite, but we did focus on the constructive feedback as opposed to the rantings on social media networks. Ubuntu is a shared project, our community is an integral part of the project, but we have to have a platform of respect and collaboration to do good work...and this is why we focused on the feedback from those who wanted to engage as opposed to yell.
I hope this answers your question. :-)
It's closely related to my major and my career plans, so I'm really curious what goes into it and what kind of surprises I might find myself confronting down the road. I think many new community managers don't build enough strategy into the plans. They have generalized plans around "growth" and "awareness". If you are working professionally for a company, this lack of meat on the bone doesn't give the company or the community enough assurances around the work.
Do you have someone on your team that is focussed on the business desktop users community? Today, not really. Our primary focus is on the collaborative contributor community. This is changing as we focus more and more on user communities (e.g. the app dev community who only want to use Ubuntu as a platform).
2) For those of us looking to contribute to Ubuntu (that have not done so in the past) what areas is the OS lacking, or what areas could we best contribute our skills? I think we need more and more folks helping with LoCo Teams (Link to loco.ubuntu.com and Documentation. We could always use hands on deck there!
Will we ever be able to run DRM protected Silverlight apps like Netflix, or SkyGo? It's pretty much the only thing I can't do on Ubuntu. I would love if we could have Netflix, but it depends on if Netflix are willing to make a Linux client.
I feel you're making a really big mistake here: Pursuing a new demographic while ignoring your core. We are not ignore Linux enthusiasts...we are just not focusing purely on them. Some people presume that just because we don't have everything that a Linux enthusiast needs we are "ignoring" them. We want to build a system for everyone, and that requires a delicate balance.
As I said earlier, for a novice user if we include too much configurabilty that doesn't make sense or is not properly designed, user testing shows that it makes Ubuntu less useful. Technically savvy people can install and add additional configurability where desired. This is why I think it is better to have a simple Unity by default and then allow people to tune and tweak it with additional tools like MyUnity where needed. This way you get the best of both worlds: a simple out of the box experience, yet Linux enthusiasts can hotrod their system to get more if they want.
Any chance of another album any soon? Also, just wanted so say thanks for all the work you in the band and the Ubuntu community. We are currently writing a new Severed Fifth album. I am also thinking of recording an acoustic album for charity.
What can we expect for the future of raspberry pi and ubuntu? I am not really sure. I have not been particularly involved in the discussions with the Raspberry Pi folks: I would love to see Ubuntu running on there.
As a Python developer I would like to ask how the Python 3 integration as the standard version with the next release (12.10) is going? Also, thanks for Ubuntu, just love it for work and personal use and Unity makes it all a joy now. :) To be honest, I am not sure how the Python 3 has progressed thus far...I know it is a core release goal, so it should go pretty well. :-)
Tits or ass? You said any question.... I like all animals, not just Blue Tits and Donkeys.
As a English Ex-Pat Do you have things other than BBQ'ing you are trying to get into the swing of? Perhaps home brewing? I would love to brew some beer. I worry about creating an ultra-death-brew though and losing a weekend. :-)
Is Canonical accepting interns at all, and if so how can I get to know more? Is Canonical accepting interns at all, and if so how can I get to know more?
Aren't you heartily sick of every public discussion you take part in getting hijacked by the small, but excessively vocal, minority of people of just can't deal with people doing some actual work to try and improve the Linux desktop experience (i.e Unity) and prepared to do anything active about their own problems? Aren't you heartily sick of every public discussion you take part in getting hijacked by the small, but excessively vocal, minority of people of just can't deal with people doing some actual work to try and improve the Linux desktop experience (i.e Unity) and prepared to do anything active about their own problems? There is definitely a vocal minority, but my take on this has been that every opinion and critique is fair so long as it is respectful, accurate, and preferably in the interests of finding a solution. Some folks have tried Ubuntu 12.04 and still don't like Unity and have a list of reasons why, and they fairly and respectfully share those views: that kind of discourse is wonderful...it helps us improve.
Did you pick the band for UDS-Q? They were awesome. Did you pick the band for UDS-Q? They were awesome.
Unity from a year ago ... ignore these people. If Unity a year ago was so bad that you're ignoring the early adopters who got burned by it, why on earth did you let it out the door? Why should they trust you now? Software is never "done", you have to release early and release often; that is at the core of how Open Source works.
"Unity" means − among other things − "the same interface for Desktops, TV, phones, tablets, cars". Have you put any thoughts in Home Automation interfaces, which I think can become a big thing in the future ? While not a core focus of the Unity team right now, I would love to see a community derivative Ubuntu distribution for home automation. I think it could be awesome. :-)
What advice can you give to someone who is new to the field of Community Management? Without wishing to push my book, I think it will be helpful for you. Just make sure you get the new 2nd Edition: there is lots of other good content in there.
My advice for getting started is to study the work of other community managers, and listen and learn from their experience. Community management is a skill that is passed on between different people, and that kind of observational work is useful in seeing patterns and approaches to the profession.
Is the 2nd edition available as an e-book? Yep! :-)
Will you be dressing up as a spherical cow for halloween? Because I'm having a damned hard time finding a quetzal costume. Srsly. :) LOL! I hope so!
Will you be coming to Ground Kontrol after the Puppet Labs party this year, and if so, will we have to physically carry you back across the river? You don't have a keynote this year, so no excuses. :P. I can try. :-)
Any plans to provide funding/grants to the LoCo teams to help them organize events or for doing what they do? Outside of our current funding, I am not sure we will be able to commit to further funding. What I would love to see is LoCo Teams supporting themselves more and more with Kickstarter campaigns and donations drives to help cover any other expenses. :-)
Are there any plans to introduce the minimizing of apps by clicking or holding their icon in the launcher? What is wrong with the minimize button? :-)
Also, are there any plans to make the dash more efficient in finding apps, files, music etc.? The design team are constantly working to improve search and findability, and I think you will see some improvements in the 12.10 cycle in this area.
Hi, recently I bought a samsung series 5 ultrabook and tried to install ubuntu on it. I discovered I couldn't. Is this some king of boycott or the problem is me? Greetings from Brazil. No idea: it should install fine. Was there a software error?
Checked to make sure you had a beard. Not disappointed. LOL!
'Did my first parachute jump' is exactly the sort of thing I was aiming at with the question, human verified accomplishements, perhaps with geo-tagged photo proof. Part of the original plan was to have human-awarded accomplishments. The classic use case we have here is something such as an Ubuntu contributor wanting to thank someone for some great work that cannot be auto-detected with the current system. We would give them the ability to award a trophy to this person so it appears in their My Trophies view.
For your parachute jump example, we could potentially set up a system where a set of people can issue trophies when they see proof of something. For example, you send someone a photo of you doing the jump and then they award the trophy.
This would be great for bucket lists (e.g. visiting a set of landmarks) and then getting trophies for each one you visit.
It is all possible, we just need more hands on deck to write the code. :-)
My uncle has ubuntu on his 3rd and 4th computers. I like to call his little son "ubuntu" Lols were had. Awesome!
Last updated: 2012-06-09 23:45 UTC
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Install Ubuntu in termux [no root] on Android

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