Where can you download the bitcoin blockchain? - Quora

(Updated) [Staking] Reddcoin Core client GUI wallet on a Raspberry Pi Model 3B

Intro

This thread is an update to my first Reddcoin staking tutorial that was written 7 months ago.
 
The reason for the update
My Reddcoin Core software crashed and became unusable. My Raspberry Pi 3B would lag and freeze, I couldn't stake anymore.
 
Instead of just redoing everything the same way, I wanted to see if I could improve on 3 points:
 
The updates
 
If you would like to tip me
Writing a tutorial like this takes time and effort; tips are appreciated. My Reddcoin address: RqvdnNX5MTam855Y2Vudv7yVgtXdcYaQAW.
     

Overview

 

Steps

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
     

Video

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Snr5e8bzftI
This video shows how long it takes to start Reddcoin Core.   TL;DR:
     

Extra

Backup
Backup your wallet to prevent losing the RDDs in your wallet! There are two methods to backup, do both. Make new backups if you create a new receiving address!
 
 
   
Boot with only 1 USB drive plugged in:
Make sure only the USB drive (with the swap partition and data partition) is plugged in when you boot up your Raspberry Pi. This to make sure the swap partition (/dev/sda1) is recognized correctly.   If you boot up with multiple USB drives, Lubuntu might see the USB drive with the swap partition as the second drive (instead of the first drive), and ignore the 2 GB swap partition. If this happens, starting Reddcoin can render the Raspberry Pi unresponsive.
   
Connection issues If you have issues syncing the blockchain because you have 0 network connections, please follow the instructions in this thread.
   
Start Reddcoin Core easier
Run a shell script (.sh file), so you can start Reddcoin just by double clicking on an icon on your Desktop.
   
Minimization options
Adjust minimization options, so you can safely press on the X button (the close/exit button on the upper right corner).
   
RealVNC VNC Viewer (client) and VNC Connect (server): To remote connect to the Raspberry Pi, I use VNC Viewer ad VNC Connect from RealVNC.
 
   
Chromium as browser: The updates break Firefox, the browser crashes when you try to run it. Install another browser, Chromium, to solve this issue.
   
Updates / Upgrades
If Software Updater shows up and tells you that there is updated software available, do not install the updates using Software Updater. Use LXTerminal to update Lubuntu.  
     

Credits:

   
Credits in previous tutorial:
submitted by Yavuz_Selim to reddCoin [link] [comments]

Run a 0.14 Full-Node on RaspberryPi3 Pruned(less than 16GB SD needed)

Hi!
Happy if this guide helps you.
Tip if you want: 19656Uwdwko5RjtnuwQENpjBwE3ChzD59v
UPDATE 04/06/17
Add 'uacomment=UASF-SegWit-BIP148' into your bitcoin.conf if you want to signal UASF.
UPDATE 03/13/17
ADDED a tl;dr; Version at the end of this Post.
UPDATE 03/12/17:
Just to test it - I reinstalled all on 8GB SD and it works as well. But maybe you should use at least 16GB for the beginning.
Using a 128GB card for the first version was a little bit stupid - so I reinstalled everything on a 8GB SD card. Including Linux and a pruned blockchain - and it works.
I used prune=550 and Jessie Lite (headless / command line) - without wallet and gui.
The SD is almost full, but it works so far
I also updated the whole manual a bit to make things more clear. Thank you for all your feedback!
Just started my Bitcoin Node today and wanted to share the way I did it with people who are interested in running their own full node. It took some time to write everything down - hopefully correct so far.
I am sure, many people around bitcoin are way more informed and educated as I am - I am the noob. So I wrote this manual to help users like me - noobs, to get started with a cheap, simple bitcoin node on raspberry pi.
Have fun!
I wanted to get my Raspberry Pi 3 working as a node to support the network. Actually the process of installing and running the node was more or less easy - but for Noobs (like I am) it might be a bit tricky to start the whole thing, because there are different ways.
Did you - like me - think you would need +120GB on the raspi, external USB HDD to be a full node? You won't!
If you have a Raspberry and you know what Bitcoin is, I guess, you are a little bit aware of linux, networks and of course bitcoin - so I won't go into detail too much.
This guide is just a little helper to get a full node running on your raspberry pi. Thanks to the help of the nice people in this sub and of course the documentation by the developers, I got it working - and of course also special thanks to raspnode.com - as I followed their tutorial to start - I went some other ways here and there - so please read carefully.
For the Part 2 I would suggest to have http://raspnode.com/diyBitcoin.html open and read through my manual.
I split the tutorial in 2 Parts - PART ONE is about installing the client on your PC and downloading the Blockchain.
PART TWO is about the setup of the raspberryPi and transferring the pruned blockchain to the pi and run it as a full node!
The first thing to be aware of is: You actually need to download the whole blockchain to get this working - if you already have your bitcoin client synced on the PC / MAC great you can reuse it!
Now you might think "but you said less than 16GB in the title!"
Yes, but the good thing is you won't need to download it on your Raspberry, neither you need to sync it completely on your raspberry which took ages (weeks!) before. When you finished this Guide, you will just have a max. 4GB Blockchain on your Raspberry Pi - but it still is a full node! The magic word is Pruning.
Maybe even a 8GB SD Card works just fine including Linux (jessie lite)!
So, if you already have a full node on your PC - Great you can almost skip PART ONE - BUT have at how to Prune in PART ONE if you don't know about it.
For PART TWO you'll need a Raspberry Pi 2 or 3 (I used 3) min. 8GB (works also) or better 16GB SD Card. (I used a 128GB for the first version of this manual - which is way too big)

PART ONE

This is the manual how to get started on you PC / MAC / Linux (I did it on Win7)
Go to: https://bitcoin.org/en/download and download the core Client for your Machine (I used win64).
Install it and configure it to save the Blockchaindata to the directory of your choice - so instead getting 120GB on your C drive, I would suggest to download it to another place like a USB drive.
You can set this up during the install. Standard folder for the blockchain folder is "%APPDATA%\Bitcoin" on Windows.
or you can do it after the install by creating a bitcoin.conf file inside your installation folder / or %APPDATA%\Bitcoin and add
datadir=l:\yourfolder
to the file. Line by line.
By the way here you could also just add dbcache - to use more memory to speed up the process a bit:
dbcache=4096
if you don't want to use the settings inside the program. (you can also set this inside the program under settings! If you have this inside the bitcoin.conf you will see the amount you set there from inside the program - it overrides the values)
You can check inside the windows client under settings, if you can see a manual dbcache is set by having a look at the left footer area. When your dbcache value shows up, everything is fine.
So the Blockchain download process will take time - maybe a few days! Depending on your machine, internet connection and HDD.
The Blockchain is huge as it contains every single transaction of the past until today. You won't need to keep your PC running all the time, you can turn it off and on and it will resync automatically when you start bitcoin-qt.exe!
Make sure to close the client always via "quit" - ctrl+q.
After you have your bitcoin core installed, the blockchain downloaded and synced - you are ready to PRUNE!
First - close the Client and let it close smoothly. After it is really closed you can follow these steps:
By pruning, your blockchain will dramatically shrink. From 120GB to just a few GB.
Be aware, that you will lose your Downloaded Blockchain as pruning will erase a big chunk of it! If you have enough space, you could of course keep the full blockchain saved somewhere on another HDD.
You can prune by editing your bitcoin.conf file by adding:
prune=550
I used prune=1024 - not sure where the differences are right now (min. prune=550). (for my 8GB version I used 550! I suggest to use this.)
Save the bitcoind.conf file and restart your windows client.
It will now clean up the Blockchain. So just the latest blocks are saved. The client should start without any problems. Maybe it takes some time to prune the blockchain data.
Check if everything works normally (the client opens as usual, you can see an empty wallet) than close the client.
Inside the Bitcoin Folder, you'll find two folders called:
blocks chainstate
those are the interesting folders containing the important data (now pruned) - and we will transfer those two to the raspberry later!
Now you are good to start the raspi transfer explained in the next part.

PART 2

Here is what I did:
1) I installed Raspian Pixel (https://www.raspberrypi.org/downloads/raspbian/) using a 128 GB SD - which is not needed because of "Pruning" - I think a 16GB card might work, too! (You can also install Raspian Jessie Lite - which saves you even more space, as it runs headless - only command line) (Updated: It is better to use Jessie Lite to save a lot of space - when you are fine with only command line)
2) I followed partly this tutorial to get everything running and setup:
http://raspnode.com/diyBitcoin.html
Please have a look at it - I have copied the Headlines in capitals to let you know what I did, and what I skipped.
On Tutorial Page: Start with RASPBIAN (OPTIONAL) CONFIG OPTIONS.
Set You RasPi up including "EDITING FILES" to save your Layout at the tutorial page and come back here.
I skipped the CONFIGURE USB AND SET AUTOMOUNT process, as we are going to use PRUNING to reduce the 120GB to a tiny filesize - so USB Devices are not needed here!
It was necessary to ENLARGE SWAP FILE to install bitcoin core - otherwise it didn't went through which ended in a frozen raspi.
So have a close look by following the raspnode tutorial at: ENLARGE SWAP FILE.
I have my raspi running via cable to router - but you can also WiFi setup everything described under NETWORKING ON THE RASPBERRY PI.
Now comes the interesting part: Follow the steps at DOWNLOADING BITCOIN CORE DEPENDENCIES - they work fine for 0.14.0 too. Git should be on Board already when you installed Pixel - otherwise you would need to install it.
sudo apt-get install git -y (only jessy lite)
I skipped the next command lines - as I don't use bitcoin-qt wallet. If you want to use it as wallet - do the step.
mkdir ~/bin cd ~bin
Now you are in the folder you want your bitcoin core data be downloaded to via git. I didn't Downloaded the Berkeley Database source code - so I also skipped the whole next command lines
[email protected]~/bin$ wget http://download.oracle.com/berkeley-db/db-4.8.30.NC.tar.gz [email protected]~/bin$ tar -xzvf db-4.8.30.NC.tar.gz [email protected]~/bin$ cd db-4.8.30.NC/build_unix/ [email protected]~/bin/db-4.8.30.NC/build_unix$ ../dist/configure --enable-cxx [email protected]~/bin/db-4.8.30.NC/build_unix$ make -j4
and went on with "INSTALLING BITCOIN"!
I followed the first part but instead downloading 0.13 I took of course the latest version:0.14
git clone -b 0.14 https://github.com/bitcoin/bitcoin.git cd bitcoin ./autogen.sh
this might take some time to start.
If you have trouble with hanging RESOLVING DELTAS - just restart the Raspberry Pi and remove the bitcoin folder inside /~bin using
rm -rf bitcoin
this command will delete the folder and you can reuse
git clone -b 0.14 https://github.com/bitcoin/bitcoin.git

For some reason RESOLVING DELTAS is a common problem with different downloads - so just retry it and at least after 3 times it should work!

as I didn't use the GUI/ Wallet, I ran
./configure --enable-upnp-default --disable-wallet
as I don't need the wallet functionality.
I didn't need to use "MAKE" which saves you maybe up to 2.5 hours.
instead you can just go ahead with:
sudo make install
(If I am wrong in doing so - please let me know)
The install takes some time - and just a heads up: when it gets stuck somewhere - just redo the installation process - it took three times to went through - stuck at some processing.
After the installation took place you can finally get your Raspberry Pi Node running in no time!
To test if the the installation went through - you can just start bitcoind using:
bitcoind &
than check if everything is working so far:
bitcoin-cli getinfo
after a few seconds you should see version: etc...
if not, something went wrong. Try to redo the steps in the raspnode tutorial.
(don't give up if it failed - retry! Ask your questions here)
IMPORTANT: you need to stop bitcoin on your raspberry now!
bitcoin-cli stop
If you don't need an external USB Drive - what I hope - as we are going to use pruning just go ahead and skip the USB part and create a file inside (or follow the raspnode tutorial on how to setup the USB drive):
cd .bitcoin
sudo nano bitcoin.conf
and enter the exact same pruning size you have used on your Desktop Machine to prune. I used 1024 but the minimum is 550. (used 550 for the 8GB SD card on PC and Raspberry)
prune=550
That's it for the raspi.
update: To signal UASF enter in a new line:
uacomment=UASF-SegWit-BIP148

TRANSFER

Now you have to transfer the two folders CHAINSTATE and BLOCKS from your PC bitcoind directory to your raspberry.
I am using a program called "WINSCP" - it is free and easy to use: https://winscp.net/eng/download.php
We need this to transfer the files to the Raspberry pi. Pretty sure you can also do it via SSH - but I am the noob. So let's keep it simple.
Open Winscp and put in the IP Address of your Raspberry Pi, User and Password (same as in SSH)
You should now see the directories on your Raspberry Pi. There is a folder called
.bitcoin
enter it and you will see the two folders
blocks & chainstate
you can delete them on the raspberry as they have some data from your previous test inside.
Make sure you can also see the bitcoin.conf file in that directory, which needs to contain the exact same prune line, like the one on your desktop machine. If not, make sure to edit it via SSH. The line "datadir=l:\yourfolder" is obviously not needed in the Raspberry bitcoin.conf file.
Now grab the two folders CHAINSTATE and BLOCKS from your PC and copy them to your .bitcoind folder.
I also copied banlist.dat, fee_estimation.dat, mempool.dat and peers.dat to the folder - not really knowing if needed! Not needed.
The whole copy process might take some minutes (against some weeks in the old way).
After copying is finished, you can now start bitcoind on the Raspberry.
bitcoind &
the & symbol let you still use the command line while the process is running btw.
The process - if succesfull - will take some time to finish.
bitcoin-cli getinfo
Will give you some informations what is going on right now. When you can see, that it is checking the blocks, this is good!
If you get an error - double check - if you have the correct prune size (same as on desktop machine) - in bitcoin.conf and that this file is inside .bitcoin on RaspberryPi. It took me some time, to find my mistakes.
Congrats! You are almost a part of the network!
To make your node now a fullnode, you will need to go to your router (often 192.168.1.1) and enable portforwarding for your raspberry pi - and open ports 8333 - that's it!
You can now go to: https://bitnodes.21.co/nodes/
scroll down to "JOIN THE NETWORK" and check check if your node IP is connected!
It will show up as soon as the blocks are checked and the raspi is running.
Well done!
Now you are running a full node, with a small Blockchain and got it working in Minutes, not weeks!
I really hope, my little tutorial worked for you and your are part of the Node network now.
If you have problems or I made a mistake in this helper tut, just let me know and I will try to make it better.
Have fun and NODL!
the noob
tl;dr; (if you are a real noob start with the non-tl;dr version!)
tl;dr; PART ONE
1) Download & install / setup bitcoincore @ https://bitcoin.org/de/download
2) change dbcache to something smaller than your memory and download the whole Blockchain (120GB).
3) create a file called bitcoin.conf put the line prune=550 (or higher) in to activate pruning on win inside %appData%/bitcoin
4) Open ports 8333 on your Router to make this a full node with a smaller Blockchain.
You are running a full node on your PC.
tl;dr; PART TWO
1) Install jessie lite and the needed dependencies on your SDCard - Raspberry
( >git clone -b 0.14 https://github.com/bitcoin/bitcoin.git )
  • see tutorial for more info.
2) create a file called bitcoin.conf inside .bitcoin and add the same prune=Number you had on your PC.
3) transfer the pruned folders BLOCKS and CHAINSTATE to the Raspberry Folder .bitcoin
4)Start "bitcoind &"
5) let everything sync
6) Make sure you have port 8333 opened on your router.
You are running a full node on your Raspberry with a super small Blockchain (I put all on a 8GB SDcard)
Tip if you want : 19656Uwdwko5RjtnuwQENpjBwE3ChzD59v
updated 03/12 - will update more, soon.
updated 03/12.2 - I updated the whole process a bit and also added some improvements.
updated 03/14/ Added a tl;dr version at the end.
submitted by I-am-the-noob to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Lore v2 QT on Raspberry Pi

Hello,
 
To follow up to mindphuk's excellent piece on building the headless client on Raspberry Pi (https://www.reddit.com/blackcoin/comments/6gkjrw/wip_blackpi_a_stake_device_based_on_raspberry/), I thought if anyone was interested I'd show you how to get the full QT version running on the Pi on the Jessie with Pixel desktop. This works and has been soak tested for several days now on a standard Raspberry Pi 3. I have since added some coins and it stakes a handful of times a day.
 
Running staking Lore clients paves the way for some of the future use cases of BLK utilising the Bitcoin 0.12 (and newer) core tech, including colored coins. So I'm going to leave this one going indefinitely to kickstart the number of Lore clients staking. It's certainly not mandatory but it will be good in the longer term to have a nice distribution of Lore staking clients.
 
The cross-compile which lets you create binaries for multiple platforms didn't work for the QT version on the Pi, so there is more to do than just running the binary unfortunately, as below. There are folks working on some much cleaner solutions than this for the Pi, with a custom front end, and where you won't have to do any mucking about. That is coming soon. In the meantime, if you enjoy a fiddle with such things, here's how to get this QT client working on your Pi.
 
These instructions assume you are starting from scratch with a completely blank OS.
 
Download Jessie with Pixel from: http://downloads.raspberrypi.org/raspbian/images/raspbian-2017-07-05/2017-07-05-raspbian-jessie.zip
 
Note they have since (August 2017) released a version called 'Stretch' which does not work with this guide. I'll see if I can come up with something new for that at some point and link to it here when I have. In the meantime the guide should work with the Jessie image above.
 
Unzip the file and extract the .img file to burn it onto Fresh SD card to boot from (to be safe, use 16GB or larger), using a tool like win32diskimager or Etcher.
 
Assuming you have keyboard/mouse and monitor plugged into your pi, boot it up and the Jessie Desktop will show.
 
Before we do anything else, you should increase the default swap size on the pi, as compiling certain libraries can exhaust the RAM and get stuck otherwise. To do this, launch a Terminal window and type:
 
sudo nano /etc/dphys-swapfile 
 
and Change the CONF_SWAPSIZE from 100 to:
 
CONF_SWAPSIZE=1024 
 
Exit nano with control + x to write out the file.
 
Then, run the following to restart the swapfile manager:
 
sudo /etc/init.d/dphys-swapfile stop sudo /etc/init.d/dphys-swapfile start 
 
Now, launch the browser and download the Lore 2.12 binaries for ARM here: https://mega.nz/#!k2InxZhb!iaLhUPreA7LZqZ-Az-0StRBUshSJ82XjldPsvhGBBH4 (Version with fee fix from 6 September 2017)
 
(If you prefer to compile it yourself instead, it is possible by following the instructions in the original article by Mindphuk just taking into account this is the newer version of the Lore client than when that was written (https://github.com/janko33bd/bitcoin/releases) and the versions of Boost and the Berkeley DB need to be the same as below.)
 
Double click the zip and extract the Lore binary files. Yes, at the moment they are all called 'bitcoin', not 'blackcoin' or 'Lore' - this is because the code derives from a recent bitcoin core implementation so this has not yet been updated. You can place these wherever you like.
 
In the Terminal window, change directory to where you put the binaries, e.g.:
 
cd Downloads/lore-raspberrypi-armv7-jessie-pixel chmod +x * 
 
That marks the binaries as executable.
 
Now, we need the Boost libraries installed for any of the Lore binaries to work. The project was done with Boost 1.62.0. Unfortunately the Jessie repository only goes up to 1.55, so we need to download and build 1.62 manually on the device.
wget https://sourceforge.net/projects/boost/files/boost/1.62.0/boost_1_62_0.tar.gz/download tar -xvzf download cd boost_1_62_0 sudo ./bootstrap.sh sudo ./b2 install 
 
(This will take almost 2 hours. Have a nice cup of tea and a sit down.)
 
When I came to run the binaries, I found they couldn't find Boost. Running this command fixes that:
sudo ldconfig 
 
Now we are going to install the packages which aren't already included in the default OS installation which the binaries need in order to run:
sudo apt-get install qrencode libprotobuf-dev libevent-pthreads-2.0-5 
 
Now we need to install the Berkeley Database version 6.2.23. This is the version Lore v2 uses. Bitcoin still uses 4.8 which is 10 years old! This doesn't take too long.
wget http://download.oracle.com/berkeley-db/db-6.2.23.tar.gz tar -xvzf db-6.2.23.tar.gz cd db-6.2.23/build_unix ../dist/configure --prefix=/usr --enable-compat185 --enable-dbm --disable-static --enable-cxx 
 
I find this next section of the Berkeley instructions worked better just switching to root, which can be fudged by running sudo su before the rest:
sudo su make make docdir=/usshare/doc/db-6.2.23 install chown -v -R root:root /usbin/db_* /usinclude/db{,_185,_cxx}.h /uslib/libdb*.{so,la} /usshare/doc/db-6.2.23 
 
Now we're going to go up a couple of directories to where the binaries were:
cd ../.. 
 
Then run the client!
./bitcoin-qt 
 
And there you have it. Should hopefully end up looking a bit like this: http://imgur.com/a/eEHGa
 
Using the Bootstrap can save a while syncing. Download it at: https://www.reddit.com/blackcoin/comments/6b3imq/blackcoin_bootstrapdat_up_to_block_1631800
 
Place the bootstrap.dat file into the ~/.lore directory.
 
Run ./bitcoin-qt again, it will say 'Importing Blocks' rather than 'Synchronising with Network'. My pi sync'ed fully in about 5-6 hours.
 
If you want peace of mind that Lore will always start on bootup into the Jessie w/Pixel desktop (i.e. after a power cycle), then you need to create a .desktop file in the following place.
sudo nano ~/.config/autostart/Lore.desktop 
 
And in it, enter the following (tailoring the Exec line below to the whereabouts of your bitcoin-qt file):
[Desktop Entry] Name=Blackcoin Lore Comment=Mining without the waste Exec=/home/pi/Downloads/lore-raspberrypi-armv7-jessie-pixel/bitcoin-qt Type=Application Encoding=UTF-8 Terminal=false Categories=None; 
 
Power usage and payback time
 
After a good while leaving it going by itself, the CPU load averages got down to almost zero, all of the time. Idling, the Pi uses a bit less than 3 watts. This means it would take two weeks to use one 1Kw/h of electricity.
 
If you pay e.g. 12.5 cents a unit, that's what you'd expect this to cost to run in a fortnight. That's around $0.25 a month or $3 a year. Green and cheap and helping to secure the BLK network. I paid for the year's worth of electricity in 2 days staking with 25k BLK. Makes mining look silly, huh? ;)
 
Securing your Pi
 
With staking, your wallet needs to be unlocked and as such, the keys to your wallet are on the device. In a clean and newly installed environment as described above, and if you don't allow others to use your device and there is no other software or nasties running on it, there is no real cause for concern. However, there are some basic security precautions you can take.
 
Firstly, if you have enabled SSH and are playing with your pi across your LAN (or worse, the Internet), you should immediately change the password for the default 'pi' user (which is preconfigured to be 'raspberry'). Simply log in as normal, then type:
 
passwd 
 
You'll be prompted to enter the old and the new passwords.
 
Security by default
 
Your Pi is likely, by default, to not be exposed to incoming connections from the outside world because your router is likely generating a private address range for your LAN (192.168.x.x or 10.0.x.x or 172.x.x.x) which means all incoming connections are effectively blocked at the router anyway unless you set up a 'port forward' record to allow packets arriving on certain ports to be forwarded to a specific internal IP address.
 
As for accessing your Pi across the internet, if you have set up a port forward, this likely has security ramifications. Even basic old fashioned protocols have proven in recent times to have uncaught flaws, so it's always advisable to lock down your device as much as possible, and even if you only plan to access the Pi over your LAN, install a firewall to configure this. I used one called ufw, because it's literally an uncomplicated firewall.
 
sudo apt-get install ufw sudo ufw allow from 192.168.0.0/16 to any port 22 sudo ufw --force enable 
 
This allows just port 22 (SSH) to be open on the Pi to any device on my LAN's subnet (192.168.0.x). You can change the above to a single IP address if paranoid, or add several lines, if you want to lock it down to your LAN and a specific external static IP address (e.g. a VPN service you use). To find out what subnet your router uses, just type:
 
ifconfig 
 
and you'll see on the interface you are using (either hard wired or wifi) the 192.168 or 10. or 172. prefix. Change the above rule so it matches the first two octets correctly (e.g. 10.0.0.0/16 if you're on a 10.0. address).
 
You may already use VNC to access your Pi's desktop across your LAN, this uses port 5900. Add a line like above to lock it down to an internal address. It's not a good idea to expose this port to the wider world because those connections are not encrypted and potentially could be subjected to a MITM attack.
 
You can query the status of the firewall like this:
ufw status 
 
And of course, try connecting remotely once you change the rules to see what works. You should consult the official documentation for further options: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/UFW
 
Back up & Recovery
 
There are again many ways to tackle this so I'll just speak about my basic precautions in this regard. Don't take it as a be-all-and-end-all!
 
The wallet.dat file is the key file (literally) containing all the private/public keys and transactions. This can be found in:
 
~/.lore 
 
You can navigate there using Jessie w/Pixel's own file manager or in a terminal window (cd ~/.lore). You can copy this file or, if you'd rather keep a plain text file of all your public and private keys, use the 'dumpwallet' command in the console. In Lore, go to Help > Debug Window > Console and type 'dumpwallet myfilename' where myfilename is the file you want it to spit out with all your keys in it. This file will end up in the same place you launch bitcoin-qt from.
 
The instructions earlier on, when running Lore for the first time intentionally left out encrypting your wallet.dat file because in order for the wallet to stake upon startup, it needs to have a decrypted key already. This isn't perfect, but after a power cycle, it would never stake unless you left it decrypted. So the best practice here is as soon as the wallet.dat file has left your device, i.e. you copy it to a USB stick for example, put it in an encrypted folder or drive (or both).
 
In Windows, one way is to use Bitlocker drive encryption for the entire drive. You should follow the instructions here to encrypt your flash drive before your wallet.dat is on there, and don't forget the password!!
http://infosec.nmsu.edu/instructions-guides/how-to-enable-bitlocker-to-go-for-external-hard-drives-and-usb-flash-drives/
 
On the Mac, I use a software package called Concealer to encrypt files I store on the Mac itself: http://www.belightsoft.com/products/conceale   There are almost certainly free packages with similar functionality, I have just used that one for years.
 
Either way, if you want to just make sure your USB drive is encrypted, you can do so in one-click in Finder before you put the sensitive files on it: http://lifehacker.com/encrypt-a-usb-stick-in-finder-with-a-click-1594798016
 
Note that these disk encryption methods may mean having to access the USB stick on a PC or Mac in order to retrieve the files in the event of a disaster. Be aware this may mean exposing them to more security issues if your computer is in any way compromised or someone nefarious has access to your computer. There are more 'manual' ways of backing up and recovering, such as literally writing down private/public key pairs which this guide doesn't go into, but may suit you better if paranoid about your setup.
 
Recovery
 
The wallet.dat file has everything in it you need to recover your wallet, or if you used 'dumpwallet', the file you saved out has all the keys.
 
Wallet.dat method: Install Lore as normal then replace any auto-generated wallet.dat in ~/.lore directory with your backup. If a lot of time has elapsed and many transactions have occurred since your backup, launch lore with:
./bitcoin-qt -rescan 
 
And if that doesn't do the job, do a full reindex of the blockchain:
 
./bitcoin-qt -reindex 
 
If you used the dumpwallet command, install Lore then place the file containing all the keys that you saved out in the same directory as bitcoin-qt. In Lore, go to Help > Debug Window > Console and type 'importwallet myfilename' where myfilename is that file containing all the keys. The wallet should automatically rescan for transactions at that point and you should be good to go.
 
There are a million ways to do effective security and disaster recovery, but I hope this shows you a couple of basic precautionary ways. There are discussions about better ways to stake without compromising too much security which are happening all the time and developments in this regard will happen in time.
 
In the meantime, feel free to comment with your best practices.
 
submitted by patcrypt to blackcoin [link] [comments]

Backup Wallet.dat

"1) I can backup my wallet by exporting a wallet.dat file. Do I have to do this everytime I receive more BBP? Or just whenever I add a new key? 2) How do I add new keys? 3) Can I generate and see the private key so that I can write it down/print it and store it somewhere safe?" -znffal
1) think of your wallet.dat file as your passbook in a passbook savings account. You have to have that .dat file to be able to access (and prove you SHOULD have access) to the BBP stored in your account addresses. Exporting it once is all you need.
2) Adding new keys? The passphrase (password) you use is the only "key" you would have in an encrypted wallet (besides the .dat file). If you mean new addresses, you can get those by going under File and Sending (or Receving) Addresses and hit "new".
3) Clicking Encrypt Wallet will be where you choose a passphase, I don't know you can see it other than when you enter it.
To put a real world example or two.
Example One: You don't ever encrypt or backup your wallet. If I borrowed/stole/hacked your computer, I could send all your coins to my wallet (no passphrase).
Example Two: You encrypt your wallet with the passphrase "secret" but don't backup the wallet.dat file, then your computer crashes and you lose all your data. Since you didn't have a copy of the wallet.dat file, your coins would be lost.
Example Three: You backup your wallet.dat but don't encrypt it. Your computer crashes and all your data is lost, but you re-download the QT program, restore your wallet.dat, all your coins are still in you wallet. But if you lose your USB drive that has the wallet.dat on it, and I find it, I can put your wallet.dat on another computer and send all your coins to my wallet.
Example Four: You encrypt your wallet and back up the wallet.dat file. If I hack/borrow your computer, unless I guess your passphrase your coins are safe. If you computer crashes, your can restore your wallet.dat file to another computer and your coins are safe.
In short, Encrypt your wallet (passpharse) and then backup (copy) the wallet.dat file to at least two locations." -616westwarmoth
"Find your wallet.dat file, copy it to a flash drive or any other secure place. If your computer crashes, you'll always have the wallet.dat and can put it on a new machine. It will have to resync a bit when you do, but you'll never lose your "key" to the wallet. Speaking of keys, you should password protect your wallet and make sure to remember it!"
"Yes you must have a copy of the wallet.dat somewhere. So multiple back up copies are a good idea. If you lose the wallet.dat file the coins will be in limbo but there will be no way to recreate the file. One thing to remember is it doesn't matter if the wallet.dat file is "current", it can be 10 years old on a flash drive and you can download a new client, put the wallet.dat file into the machine and you'll be good." -616westwarmoth
"In addition to this, whenever you reboot the node after more than 24 hours of being synced, we back your wallet.dat up into the "backups" folder. This is useful if you ever accidentally delete your wallet.dat.
Also, if you want a paper backup, you can do a 'dumpprivkey accountaddress' command from the RPC." -Rob
"wallet is a collection of private keys"
"there are other ways to achieve high security. You can make a new wallet, encrypt it with a long password, send coins to it, put it on a flash drive and put it in cold storage, then download the hard drive cleaning program and erase the wallet.dat sectors from your PC. And of course, keep a printed copy of the private key on paper and put it in a safe. Put the usb in the safe also. Burn a cd rom with the wallet.dat file and put it in the safe." -Rob
How to safely back up your wallet https://dashpay.atlassian.net/wiki/spaces/DOC/pages/1867878/How+to+safely+back+up+your+wallet
Keep Your Crypto #SAFU (CZ's Tips) https://www.binance.com/en/blog/421499824684900429/Keep-Your-Crypto-SAFU-CZs-Tips
References: https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=2042657.msg23955128#msg23955128 http://forum.biblepay.org/index.php?topic=27.0 https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=2388064.msg27797529#msg27797529
To Read: https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Wallet https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Storing_bitcoins https://bitcoin.org/en/secure-your-wallet
NOTE: As of version 1.4.3.1 we have updated to HD wallets, so you should not need to worry about keypools anymore if you have upgraded
"Regarding the Sanctuary, you receive payments always to the same address (key), so the keypool is not consumed for those payments. But when you click to generate a new address on the "Receive" tab, one key will be deducted from the keypool. Also, sometimes new addresses are automatically generated and the keypool is consumed, for example when solo mining and finding a block, a new address could be used for the block reward.
You can always check your current keypool size by typing "getwalletinfo" in the RPC console and see "keypoolsize" and "keys_left". It's only concerning if they are a low number and you plan to generate new addresses in your wallet. They start from 1000. If the number gets too low, you can just type "keypoolrefill" to refill them back to 1000 and then you should backup the wallet. But from my experience the wallet automatically refills the keypool from time to time (or after certain actions like transactions), because I see that my wallet file keeps getting larger and the "keys_left" returns to 1000.
The only issue is if you actively use your wallet on multiple computers (for example cloud mining or simply sometimes using the wallet on your laptop), then one wallet could refill the keypool with new addresses and the other one will not, or they will generate different new addresses. If I understand this correctly, for example, you could receive a payment on a new address generated in one wallet; your old balance will be there on both wallets, but only the one wallet where you generated the new address would show the new payment. Then you should copy the wallet.dat file to other computers, to update them.
If you use the wallet on just one computer, you should just backup the wallet from time to time (or when you see it has increased in size). Qt also backups wallet.dat automatically, those can be found in the folder %AppData%\BiblepayCore\backups, you will see that they also have timestamps in their names and possibly different sizes." -inblue
https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=2388064.msg27391534#msg27391534
submitted by togoshige to BiblePay [link] [comments]

[Guide] How to transfer your wallet from your computer to android.

I got tired of waiting and waiting for the whole blockchain to sync so I decided to move my dogecoins to my phone since the app does not need to download the whole chain. (Luckily there is a bounty for a electrum equivalent that will hopefully arrive soon.)
It is much much easier if you just transfer some funds to a new address on your android phone, but this tutorial is for those people like me who can't even get the dogecoin app to sync.
Surprisingly the whole process was very simple. Don't be put off by all the text or all the talk about security. I just want things to be accessible to beginners and to practice good habits. Root is not required.
Note: I am assuming you are using the official dogecoin-qt app and the Dogecoin Wallet app by langerhans.
Disclaimer: This will involve having your private key stored in plaintext. Proceed with caution and treat that file like you would a password. Do not share your private key with anyone.

Getting your private keys

A wallet comprises of public keys and private keys. Public keys are the addresses that you share, you can only use them for viewing. Private keys let you actually make transfers and are what makes you the owner of the wallet. Today we will be transferring those private keys to your phone. They will still be present on your computer unless you delete them, so keep that in mind security-wise.
You will have to replace everything in '<>' with your own values.
  1. Open the desktop app
  2. Open the wallet console by going to: Help -> Debug Window -> Console
  3. If your wallet is locked with a password, you'll need to unlock it by typing: "walletpassphrase 120".
  4. Get the private key for an address by typing: "dumpprivkey "
  5. Save the private key to a file.
  6. Repeat this for each address that you want to transfer over.
Please think about how much dogecoins you want to transfer over. Brarsh:
Do you need that much? What if you lose your device? Just like only keeping a small amount of cash in your wallet and most safe in the bank, only carry what you could conceivably use for that time without access to your main wallet.

Creating a backup file

Next we need to create a backup file so that we can import our addresses into the android app. The android app uses the same format for its backup files as MultiBit (A popular bitcoin app). A typical file looks like the following:
# KEEP YOUR PRIVATE KEYS SAFE! Anyone who can read this can spend your Bitcoins. Kwmxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx 2013-06-22T18:36:35Z L1Sxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx 2013-05-04T22:47:32Z Kxwxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx 2013-05-08T00:58:28Z 
What we want to do is put our private keys in the following format: key date-of-address-creation, where the date is in the format YYYY-MM-DDTHH:MM:SSZ. Note the T and the Z. The android app needs the date so it knows how far back into the blockchain it needs to sync.
If you can't remember when you created the address, visit http://dogechain.info/address/YOURADDRESS and get the date of the earliest transaction. It says that the dates are approximate, so I'd just put 00:00:00 for the time.
You should now have a valid unencrypted backup of your wallet.

Importing the backup

  1. Transfer the backup to your android phone, placing it in your Download folder. It has to be put in the Download folder or else the dogecoin app won't find the backup. Make sure it has a name you'll remember later.
  2. Open the dogecoin app and click on: Back Up Keys -> Restore private keys. Click on the name of the backup and from the list that shows up, look for your backup, which should be unencrypted. Click Restore.
  3. Delete the backup in your Downloads folder. Remember, your private key is stored in plaintext in there, so it is important that you delete it. Delete the backup on your computer if it is there also.
  4. Wait for the app to sync completely. Your addresses will be added to the addresses that were already in the app, and your transactions should show up. If they do not, make sure that the date you put was correct and early enough.
  5. Go to Back up Keys > Back up private keys and create a backup. This time it will be encrypted with a password :). If you do not have a backup, you could lose all your coins if you lose your phone or the data on it.
  6. To the moon!

Terminology

I just got into dogecoin two days ago so correct me if any of this is wrong. Same thing with anything in the post :).
Blockchain/Dogechain: The blockchain is a ledger (record) of all the dogecoin transactions that have ever taken place. As of writing it is larger than 1GB in size. The blockchain is needed to find out how many funds you have in your wallet.
Wallet: A wallet is the digital equivalent of a real life wallet. It is where your money is tied to (It doesn't contain actual dogecoins, but someone else could explain that better than me). The wallet contains your addresses and your private keys, both which are needed to receive and send dogecoins respectively.

Sources

Getting your private key
Importing the key into the android app
submitted by cooper12 to dogecoin [link] [comments]

Blockchain corrupted after each computer restart. Help!

Hello!
A little while back I started having a problem with Bitcoin - QT where every time I restart my computer it tells me that the blockchain is corrupted and I have to download the whole thing again. I switched to Armory just to see if that would make a difference but I guess it doesn't since it runs BitcoinQT anyway.
I have the latest versions of BitcoinQT and Armory and am running Windows 7.
Any ideas? I did have to move the roaming folders of each program to a different drive due to size issues on my c drive maybe that's messing everything up? Any help appreciated!
submitted by artilekt to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

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The Bitcoin ledger is currently at block 534551 and is 177 Gigs in size at the time of this writing 7/31/2018. HUGE! It will take even a fast connection several days to download the chain, due to the seeding and verification method used by the Bit... If you have already downloaded the data then you will have to move the data to the new folder. If you want to store them in D:\BitcoinData then click on "Properties" of a shortcut to bitcoin-qt.exe and add -datadir=D:\BitcoinData at the end as an example: "C:\Program Files (x86)\Bitcoin\bitcoin-qt.exe" -datadir=d:\BitcoinData Begin by renaming the Bitcoin Core data directory. Use the name bitcoin-backup. Don’t move the renamed folder. This allows recovery of the original data directory in case something goes wrong. To recover the original, reinstate the original name of the bitcoin-backup folder (either Bitcoin or .bitcoin). Bitcoin Core initial synchronization will take time and download a lot of data. You should make sure that you have enough bandwidth and storage for the full block chain size (over 200GB). If you have a good Internet connection, you can help strengthen the network by keeping your PC running with Bitcoin Core and port 8333 open. Make the new shortcut for bitcoin-qt.exe with next parameters: bitcoin-qt.exe -datadir='D:\blockchain' Make sure that you set correct destination for datadir and replace path 'D:\blockchain' to your downloaded blockchain folder if needed. Start the program using shortcut.

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