Bitcoin Unconfirmed Transactions | BitcoinChain.com

Is there a list of old/all unconfirmed bitcoin transactions ever broadcast?

I'm doing research into unconfirmed transactions, historical reasons for not having confirmation of transaction and trying to see if there are any irregularities/interesting pieces of information to be gained from this search. I'll let the community know what I've found if I find anything noteworthy.
I know the most about bitcoin, but presume that I could also look into other crypto currencies that aso have unconfirmed transactions.
Off the top of my head possibly I could find mass malformed transactions, wallet bugs that cause transactions to be denied, confirmations that are presumed to be of the types RBF and CPFP, as well as others if I had a historical source of unconfirmed transactions. I realize that these aren't in the blockchain and am wondering if anyone has been storing these for any purposes.
submitted by fiasco_averted to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Is there a list of old/all unconfirmed bitcoin transactions ever broadcast? /r/Bitcoin

Is there a list of old/all unconfirmed bitcoin transactions ever broadcast? /Bitcoin submitted by HiIAMCaptainObvious to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

4037 Unconfirmed Transactions Live updating list of new bitcoin transactions /r/Bitcoin

4037 Unconfirmed Transactions Live updating list of new bitcoin transactions /Bitcoin submitted by HiIAMCaptainObvious to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

How do I help with the list of unconfirmed transactions? /r/Bitcoin

How do I help with the list of unconfirmed transactions? /Bitcoin submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Technical: Taproot: Why Activate?

This is a follow-up on https://old.reddit.com/Bitcoin/comments/hqzp14/technical_the_path_to_taproot_activation/
Taproot! Everybody wants it!! But... you might ask yourself: sure, everybody else wants it, but why would I, sovereign Bitcoin HODLer, want it? Surely I can be better than everybody else because I swapped XXX fiat for Bitcoin unlike all those nocoiners?
And it is important for you to know the reasons why you, o sovereign Bitcoiner, would want Taproot activated. After all, your nodes (or the nodes your wallets use, which if you are SPV, you hopefully can pester to your wallet vendoimplementor about) need to be upgraded in order for Taproot activation to actually succeed instead of becoming a hot sticky mess.
First, let's consider some principles of Bitcoin.
I'm sure most of us here would agree that the above are very important principles of Bitcoin and that these are principles we would not be willing to remove. If anything, we would want those principles strengthened (especially the last one, financial privacy, which current Bitcoin is only sporadically strong with: you can get privacy, it just requires effort to do so).
So, how does Taproot affect those principles?

Taproot and Your /Coins

Most HODLers probably HODL their coins in singlesig addresses. Sadly, switching to Taproot would do very little for you (it gives a mild discount at spend time, at the cost of a mild increase in fee at receive time (paid by whoever sends to you, so if it's a self-send from a P2PKH or bech32 address, you pay for this); mostly a wash).
(technical details: a Taproot output is 1 version byte + 32 byte public key, while a P2WPKH (bech32 singlesig) output is 1 version byte + 20 byte public key hash, so the Taproot output spends 12 bytes more; spending from a P2WPKH requires revealing a 32-byte public key later, which is not needed with Taproot, and Taproot signatures are about 9 bytes smaller than P2WPKH signatures, but the 32 bytes plus 9 bytes is divided by 4 because of the witness discount, so it saves about 11 bytes; mostly a wash, it increases blockweight by about 1 virtual byte, 4 weight for each Taproot-output-input, compared to P2WPKH-output-input).
However, as your HODLings grow in value, you might start wondering if multisignature k-of-n setups might be better for the security of your savings. And it is in multisignature that Taproot starts to give benefits!
Taproot switches to using Schnorr signing scheme. Schnorr makes key aggregation -- constructing a single public key from multiple public keys -- almost as trivial as adding numbers together. "Almost" because it involves some fairly advanced math instead of simple boring number adding, but hey when was the last time you added up your grocery list prices by hand huh?
With current P2SH and P2WSH multisignature schemes, if you have a 2-of-3 setup, then to spend, you need to provide two different signatures from two different public keys. With Taproot, you can create, using special moon math, a single public key that represents your 2-of-3 setup. Then you just put two of your devices together, have them communicate to each other (this can be done airgapped, in theory, by sending QR codes: the software to do this is not even being built yet, but that's because Taproot hasn't activated yet!), and they will make a single signature to authorize any spend from your 2-of-3 address. That's 73 witness bytes -- 18.25 virtual bytes -- of signatures you save!
And if you decide that your current setup with 1-of-1 P2PKH / P2WPKH addresses is just fine as-is: well, that's the whole point of a softfork: backwards-compatibility; you can receive from Taproot users just fine, and once your wallet is updated for Taproot-sending support, you can send to Taproot users just fine as well!
(P2WPKH and P2WSH -- SegWit v0 -- addresses start with bc1q; Taproot -- SegWit v1 --- addresses start with bc1p, in case you wanted to know the difference; in bech32 q is 0, p is 1)
Now how about HODLers who keep all, or some, of their coins on custodial services? Well, any custodial service worth its salt would be doing at least 2-of-3, or probably something even bigger, like 11-of-15. So your custodial service, if it switched to using Taproot internally, could save a lot more (imagine an 11-of-15 getting reduced from 11 signatures to just 1!), which --- we can only hope! --- should translate to lower fees and better customer service from your custodial service!
So I think we can say, very accurately, that the Bitcoin principle --- that YOU are in control of your money --- can only be helped by Taproot (if you are doing multisignature), and, because P2PKH and P2WPKH remain validly-usable addresses in a Taproot future, will not be harmed by Taproot. Its benefit to this principle might be small (it mostly only benefits multisignature users) but since it has no drawbacks with this (i.e. singlesig users can continue to use P2WPKH and P2PKH still) this is still a nice, tidy win!
(even singlesig users get a minor benefit, in that multisig users will now reduce their blockchain space footprint, so that fees can be kept low for everybody; so for example even if you have your single set of private keys engraved on titanium plates sealed in an airtight box stored in a safe buried in a desert protected by angry nomads riding giant sandworms because you're the frickin' Kwisatz Haderach, you still gain some benefit from Taproot)
And here's the important part: if P2PKH/P2WPKH is working perfectly fine with you and you decide to never use Taproot yourself, Taproot will not affect you detrimentally. First do no harm!

Taproot and Your Contracts

No one is an island, no one lives alone. Give and you shall receive. You know: by trading with other people, you can gain expertise in some obscure little necessity of the world (and greatly increase your productivity in that little field), and then trade the products of your expertise for necessities other people have created, all of you thereby gaining gains from trade.
So, contracts, which are basically enforceable agreements that facilitate trading with people who you do not personally know and therefore might not trust.
Let's start with a simple example. You want to buy some gewgaws from somebody. But you don't know them personally. The seller wants the money, you want their gewgaws, but because of the lack of trust (you don't know them!! what if they're scammers??) neither of you can benefit from gains from trade.
However, suppose both of you know of some entity that both of you trust. That entity can act as a trusted escrow. The entity provides you security: this enables the trade, allowing both of you to get gains from trade.
In Bitcoin-land, this can be implemented as a 2-of-3 multisignature. The three signatories in the multisgnature would be you, the gewgaw seller, and the escrow. You put the payment for the gewgaws into this 2-of-3 multisignature address.
Now, suppose it turns out neither of you are scammers (whaaaat!). You receive the gewgaws just fine and you're willing to pay up for them. Then you and the gewgaw seller just sign a transaction --- you and the gewgaw seller are 2, sufficient to trigger the 2-of-3 --- that spends from the 2-of-3 address to a singlesig the gewgaw seller wants (or whatever address the gewgaw seller wants).
But suppose some problem arises. The seller gave you gawgews instead of gewgaws. Or you decided to keep the gewgaws but not sign the transaction to release the funds to the seller. In either case, the escrow is notified, and if it can sign with you to refund the funds back to you (if the seller was a scammer) or it can sign with the seller to forward the funds to the seller (if you were a scammer).
Taproot helps with this: like mentioned above, it allows multisignature setups to produce only one signature, reducing blockchain space usage, and thus making contracts --- which require multiple people, by definition, you don't make contracts with yourself --- is made cheaper (which we hope enables more of these setups to happen for more gains from trade for everyone, also, moon and lambos).
(technology-wise, it's easier to make an n-of-n than a k-of-n, making a k-of-n would require a complex setup involving a long ritual with many communication rounds between the n participants, but an n-of-n can be done trivially with some moon math. You can, however, make what is effectively a 2-of-3 by using a three-branch SCRIPT: either 2-of-2 of you and seller, OR 2-of-2 of you and escrow, OR 2-of-2 of escrow and seller. Fortunately, Taproot adds a facility to embed a SCRIPT inside a public key, so you can have a 2-of-2 Taprooted address (between you and seller) with a SCRIPT branch that can instead be spent with 2-of-2 (you + escrow) OR 2-of-2 (seller + escrow), which implements the three-branched SCRIPT above. If neither of you are scammers (hopefully the common case) then you both sign using your keys and never have to contact the escrow, since you are just using the escrow public key without coordinating with them (because n-of-n is trivial but k-of-n requires setup with communication rounds), so in the "best case" where both of you are honest traders, you also get a privacy boost, in that the escrow never learns you have been trading on gewgaws, I mean ewww, gawgews are much better than gewgaws and therefore I now judge you for being a gewgaw enthusiast, you filthy gewgawer).

Taproot and Your Contracts, Part 2: Cryptographic Boogaloo

Now suppose you want to buy some data instead of things. For example, maybe you have some closed-source software in trial mode installed, and want to pay the developer for the full version. You want to pay for an activation code.
This can be done, today, by using an HTLC. The developer tells you the hash of the activation code. You pay to an HTLC, paying out to the developer if it reveals the preimage (the activation code), or refunding the money back to you after a pre-agreed timeout. If the developer claims the funds, it has to reveal the preimage, which is the activation code, and you can now activate your software. If the developer does not claim the funds by the timeout, you get refunded.
And you can do that, with HTLCs, today.
Of course, HTLCs do have problems:
Fortunately, with Schnorr (which is enabled by Taproot), we can now use the Scriptless Script constuction by Andrew Poelstra. This Scriptless Script allows a new construction, the PTLC or Pointlocked Timelocked Contract. Instead of hashes and preimages, just replace "hash" with "point" and "preimage" with "scalar".
Or as you might know them: "point" is really "public key" and "scalar" is really a "private key". What a PTLC does is that, given a particular public key, the pointlocked branch can be spent only if the spender reveals the private key of the given public key to you.
Another nice thing with PTLCs is that they are deniable. What appears onchain is just a single 2-of-2 signature between you and the developemanufacturer. It's like a magic trick. This signature has no special watermarks, it's a perfectly normal signature (the pledge). However, from this signature, plus some datta given to you by the developemanufacturer (known as the adaptor signature) you can derive the private key of a particular public key you both agree on (the turn). Anyone scraping the blockchain will just see signatures that look just like every other signature, and as long as nobody manages to hack you and get a copy of the adaptor signature or the private key, they cannot get the private key behind the public key (point) that the pointlocked branch needs (the prestige).
(Just to be clear, the public key you are getting the private key from, is distinct from the public key that the developemanufacturer will use for its funds. The activation key is different from the developer's onchain Bitcoin key, and it is the activation key whose private key you will be learning, not the developer's/manufacturer's onchain Bitcoin key).
So:
Taproot lets PTLCs exist onchain because they enable Schnorr, which is a requirement of PTLCs / Scriptless Script.
(technology-wise, take note that Scriptless Script works only for the "pointlocked" branch of the contract; you need normal Script, or a pre-signed nLockTimed transaction, for the "timelocked" branch. Since Taproot can embed a script, you can have the Taproot pubkey be a 2-of-2 to implement the Scriptless Script "pointlocked" branch, then have a hidden script that lets you recover the funds with an OP_CHECKLOCKTIMEVERIFY after the timeout if the seller does not claim the funds.)

Quantum Quibbles!

Now if you were really paying attention, you might have noticed this parenthetical:
(technical details: a Taproot output is 1 version byte + 32 byte public key, while a P2WPKH (bech32 singlesig) output is 1 version byte + 20 byte public key hash...)
So wait, Taproot uses raw 32-byte public keys, and not public key hashes? Isn't that more quantum-vulnerable??
Well, in theory yes. In practice, they probably are not.
It's not that hashes can be broken by quantum computes --- they're still not. Instead, you have to look at how you spend from a P2WPKH/P2PKH pay-to-public-key-hash.
When you spend from a P2PKH / P2WPKH, you have to reveal the public key. Then Bitcoin hashes it and checks if this matches with the public-key-hash, and only then actually validates the signature for that public key.
So an unconfirmed transaction, floating in the mempools of nodes globally, will show, in plain sight for everyone to see, your public key.
(public keys should be public, that's why they're called public keys, LOL)
And if quantum computers are fast enough to be of concern, then they are probably fast enough that, in the several minutes to several hours from broadcast to confirmation, they have already cracked the public key that is openly broadcast with your transaction. The owner of the quantum computer can now replace your unconfirmed transaction with one that pays the funds to itself. Even if you did not opt-in RBF, miners are still incentivized to support RBF on RBF-disabled transactions.
So the extra hash is not as significant a protection against quantum computers as you might think. Instead, the extra hash-and-compare needed is just extra validation effort.
Further, if you have ever, in the past, spent from the address, then there exists already a transaction indelibly stored on the blockchain, openly displaying the public key from which quantum computers can derive the private key. So those are still vulnerable to quantum computers.
For the most part, the cryptographers behind Taproot (and Bitcoin Core) are of the opinion that quantum computers capable of cracking Bitcoin pubkeys are unlikely to appear within a decade or two.
So:
For now, the homomorphic and linear properties of elliptic curve cryptography provide a lot of benefits --- particularly the linearity property is what enables Scriptless Script and simple multisignature (i.e. multisignatures that are just 1 signature onchain). So it might be a good idea to take advantage of them now while we are still fairly safe against quantum computers. It seems likely that quantum-safe signature schemes are nonlinear (thus losing these advantages).

Summary

I Wanna Be The Taprooter!

So, do you want to help activate Taproot? Here's what you, mister sovereign Bitcoin HODLer, can do!

But I Hate Taproot!!

That's fine!

Discussions About Taproot Activation

submitted by almkglor to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

[ Bitcoin ] Technical: Taproot: Why Activate?

Topic originally posted in Bitcoin by almkglor [link]
This is a follow-up on https://old.reddit.com/Bitcoin/comments/hqzp14/technical_the_path_to_taproot_activation/
Taproot! Everybody wants it!! But... you might ask yourself: sure, everybody else wants it, but why would I, sovereign Bitcoin HODLer, want it? Surely I can be better than everybody else because I swapped XXX fiat for Bitcoin unlike all those nocoiners?
And it is important for you to know the reasons why you, o sovereign Bitcoiner, would want Taproot activated. After all, your nodes (or the nodes your wallets use, which if you are SPV, you hopefully can pester to your wallet vendoimplementor about) need to be upgraded in order for Taproot activation to actually succeed instead of becoming a hot sticky mess.
First, let's consider some principles of Bitcoin.
I'm sure most of us here would agree that the above are very important principles of Bitcoin and that these are principles we would not be willing to remove. If anything, we would want those principles strengthened (especially the last one, financial privacy, which current Bitcoin is only sporadically strong with: you can get privacy, it just requires effort to do so).
So, how does Taproot affect those principles?

Taproot and Your /Coins

Most HODLers probably HODL their coins in singlesig addresses. Sadly, switching to Taproot would do very little for you (it gives a mild discount at spend time, at the cost of a mild increase in fee at receive time (paid by whoever sends to you, so if it's a self-send from a P2PKH or bech32 address, you pay for this); mostly a wash).
(technical details: a Taproot output is 1 version byte + 32 byte public key, while a P2WPKH (bech32 singlesig) output is 1 version byte + 20 byte public key hash, so the Taproot output spends 12 bytes more; spending from a P2WPKH requires revealing a 32-byte public key later, which is not needed with Taproot, and Taproot signatures are about 9 bytes smaller than P2WPKH signatures, but the 32 bytes plus 9 bytes is divided by 4 because of the witness discount, so it saves about 11 bytes; mostly a wash, it increases blockweight by about 1 virtual byte, 4 weight for each Taproot-output-input, compared to P2WPKH-output-input).
However, as your HODLings grow in value, you might start wondering if multisignature k-of-n setups might be better for the security of your savings. And it is in multisignature that Taproot starts to give benefits!
Taproot switches to using Schnorr signing scheme. Schnorr makes key aggregation -- constructing a single public key from multiple public keys -- almost as trivial as adding numbers together. "Almost" because it involves some fairly advanced math instead of simple boring number adding, but hey when was the last time you added up your grocery list prices by hand huh?
With current P2SH and P2WSH multisignature schemes, if you have a 2-of-3 setup, then to spend, you need to provide two different signatures from two different public keys. With Taproot, you can create, using special moon math, a single public key that represents your 2-of-3 setup. Then you just put two of your devices together, have them communicate to each other (this can be done airgapped, in theory, by sending QR codes: the software to do this is not even being built yet, but that's because Taproot hasn't activated yet!), and they will make a single signature to authorize any spend from your 2-of-3 address. That's 73 witness bytes -- 18.25 virtual bytes -- of signatures you save!
And if you decide that your current setup with 1-of-1 P2PKH / P2WPKH addresses is just fine as-is: well, that's the whole point of a softfork: backwards-compatibility; you can receive from Taproot users just fine, and once your wallet is updated for Taproot-sending support, you can send to Taproot users just fine as well!
(P2WPKH and P2WSH -- SegWit v0 -- addresses start with bc1q; Taproot -- SegWit v1 --- addresses start with bc1p, in case you wanted to know the difference; in bech32 q is 0, p is 1)
Now how about HODLers who keep all, or some, of their coins on custodial services? Well, any custodial service worth its salt would be doing at least 2-of-3, or probably something even bigger, like 11-of-15. So your custodial service, if it switched to using Taproot internally, could save a lot more (imagine an 11-of-15 getting reduced from 11 signatures to just 1!), which --- we can only hope! --- should translate to lower fees and better customer service from your custodial service!
So I think we can say, very accurately, that the Bitcoin principle --- that YOU are in control of your money --- can only be helped by Taproot (if you are doing multisignature), and, because P2PKH and P2WPKH remain validly-usable addresses in a Taproot future, will not be harmed by Taproot. Its benefit to this principle might be small (it mostly only benefits multisignature users) but since it has no drawbacks with this (i.e. singlesig users can continue to use P2WPKH and P2PKH still) this is still a nice, tidy win!
(even singlesig users get a minor benefit, in that multisig users will now reduce their blockchain space footprint, so that fees can be kept low for everybody; so for example even if you have your single set of private keys engraved on titanium plates sealed in an airtight box stored in a safe buried in a desert protected by angry nomads riding giant sandworms because you're the frickin' Kwisatz Haderach, you still gain some benefit from Taproot)
And here's the important part: if P2PKH/P2WPKH is working perfectly fine with you and you decide to never use Taproot yourself, Taproot will not affect you detrimentally. First do no harm!

Taproot and Your Contracts

No one is an island, no one lives alone. Give and you shall receive. You know: by trading with other people, you can gain expertise in some obscure little necessity of the world (and greatly increase your productivity in that little field), and then trade the products of your expertise for necessities other people have created, all of you thereby gaining gains from trade.
So, contracts, which are basically enforceable agreements that facilitate trading with people who you do not personally know and therefore might not trust.
Let's start with a simple example. You want to buy some gewgaws from somebody. But you don't know them personally. The seller wants the money, you want their gewgaws, but because of the lack of trust (you don't know them!! what if they're scammers??) neither of you can benefit from gains from trade.
However, suppose both of you know of some entity that both of you trust. That entity can act as a trusted escrow. The entity provides you security: this enables the trade, allowing both of you to get gains from trade.
In Bitcoin-land, this can be implemented as a 2-of-3 multisignature. The three signatories in the multisgnature would be you, the gewgaw seller, and the escrow. You put the payment for the gewgaws into this 2-of-3 multisignature address.
Now, suppose it turns out neither of you are scammers (whaaaat!). You receive the gewgaws just fine and you're willing to pay up for them. Then you and the gewgaw seller just sign a transaction --- you and the gewgaw seller are 2, sufficient to trigger the 2-of-3 --- that spends from the 2-of-3 address to a singlesig the gewgaw seller wants (or whatever address the gewgaw seller wants).
But suppose some problem arises. The seller gave you gawgews instead of gewgaws. Or you decided to keep the gewgaws but not sign the transaction to release the funds to the seller. In either case, the escrow is notified, and if it can sign with you to refund the funds back to you (if the seller was a scammer) or it can sign with the seller to forward the funds to the seller (if you were a scammer).
Taproot helps with this: like mentioned above, it allows multisignature setups to produce only one signature, reducing blockchain space usage, and thus making contracts --- which require multiple people, by definition, you don't make contracts with yourself --- is made cheaper (which we hope enables more of these setups to happen for more gains from trade for everyone, also, moon and lambos).
(technology-wise, it's easier to make an n-of-n than a k-of-n, making a k-of-n would require a complex setup involving a long ritual with many communication rounds between the n participants, but an n-of-n can be done trivially with some moon math. You can, however, make what is effectively a 2-of-3 by using a three-branch SCRIPT: either 2-of-2 of you and seller, OR 2-of-2 of you and escrow, OR 2-of-2 of escrow and seller. Fortunately, Taproot adds a facility to embed a SCRIPT inside a public key, so you can have a 2-of-2 Taprooted address (between you and seller) with a SCRIPT branch that can instead be spent with 2-of-2 (you + escrow) OR 2-of-2 (seller + escrow), which implements the three-branched SCRIPT above. If neither of you are scammers (hopefully the common case) then you both sign using your keys and never have to contact the escrow, since you are just using the escrow public key without coordinating with them (because n-of-n is trivial but k-of-n requires setup with communication rounds), so in the "best case" where both of you are honest traders, you also get a privacy boost, in that the escrow never learns you have been trading on gewgaws, I mean ewww, gawgews are much better than gewgaws and therefore I now judge you for being a gewgaw enthusiast, you filthy gewgawer).

Taproot and Your Contracts, Part 2: Cryptographic Boogaloo

Now suppose you want to buy some data instead of things. For example, maybe you have some closed-source software in trial mode installed, and want to pay the developer for the full version. You want to pay for an activation code.
This can be done, today, by using an HTLC. The developer tells you the hash of the activation code. You pay to an HTLC, paying out to the developer if it reveals the preimage (the activation code), or refunding the money back to you after a pre-agreed timeout. If the developer claims the funds, it has to reveal the preimage, which is the activation code, and you can now activate your software. If the developer does not claim the funds by the timeout, you get refunded.
And you can do that, with HTLCs, today.
Of course, HTLCs do have problems:
Fortunately, with Schnorr (which is enabled by Taproot), we can now use the Scriptless Script constuction by Andrew Poelstra. This Scriptless Script allows a new construction, the PTLC or Pointlocked Timelocked Contract. Instead of hashes and preimages, just replace "hash" with "point" and "preimage" with "scalar".
Or as you might know them: "point" is really "public key" and "scalar" is really a "private key". What a PTLC does is that, given a particular public key, the pointlocked branch can be spent only if the spender reveals the private key of the given private key to you.
Another nice thing with PTLCs is that they are deniable. What appears onchain is just a single 2-of-2 signature between you and the developemanufacturer. It's like a magic trick. This signature has no special watermarks, it's a perfectly normal signature (the pledge). However, from this signature, plus some datta given to you by the developemanufacturer (known as the adaptor signature) you can derive the private key of a particular public key you both agree on (the turn). Anyone scraping the blockchain will just see signatures that look just like every other signature, and as long as nobody manages to hack you and get a copy of the adaptor signature or the private key, they cannot get the private key behind the public key (point) that the pointlocked branch needs (the prestige).
(Just to be clear, the public key you are getting the private key from, is distinct from the public key that the developemanufacturer will use for its funds. The activation key is different from the developer's onchain Bitcoin key, and it is the activation key whose private key you will be learning, not the developer's/manufacturer's onchain Bitcoin key).
So:
Taproot lets PTLCs exist onchain because they enable Schnorr, which is a requirement of PTLCs / Scriptless Script.
(technology-wise, take note that Scriptless Script works only for the "pointlocked" branch of the contract; you need normal Script, or a pre-signed nLockTimed transaction, for the "timelocked" branch. Since Taproot can embed a script, you can have the Taproot pubkey be a 2-of-2 to implement the Scriptless Script "pointlocked" branch, then have a hidden script that lets you recover the funds with an OP_CHECKLOCKTIMEVERIFY after the timeout if the seller does not claim the funds.)

Quantum Quibbles!

Now if you were really paying attention, you might have noticed this parenthetical:
(technical details: a Taproot output is 1 version byte + 32 byte public key, while a P2WPKH (bech32 singlesig) output is 1 version byte + 20 byte public key hash...)
So wait, Taproot uses raw 32-byte public keys, and not public key hashes? Isn't that more quantum-vulnerable??
Well, in theory yes. In practice, they probably are not.
It's not that hashes can be broken by quantum computes --- they're still not. Instead, you have to look at how you spend from a P2WPKH/P2PKH pay-to-public-key-hash.
When you spend from a P2PKH / P2WPKH, you have to reveal the public key. Then Bitcoin hashes it and checks if this matches with the public-key-hash, and only then actually validates the signature for that public key.
So an unconfirmed transaction, floating in the mempools of nodes globally, will show, in plain sight for everyone to see, your public key.
(public keys should be public, that's why they're called public keys, LOL)
And if quantum computers are fast enough to be of concern, then they are probably fast enough that, in the several minutes to several hours from broadcast to confirmation, they have already cracked the public key that is openly broadcast with your transaction. The owner of the quantum computer can now replace your unconfirmed transaction with one that pays the funds to itself. Even if you did not opt-in RBF, miners are still incentivized to support RBF on RBF-disabled transactions.
So the extra hash is not as significant a protection against quantum computers as you might think. Instead, the extra hash-and-compare needed is just extra validation effort.
Further, if you have ever, in the past, spent from the address, then there exists already a transaction indelibly stored on the blockchain, openly displaying the public key from which quantum computers can derive the private key. So those are still vulnerable to quantum computers.
For the most part, the cryptographers behind Taproot (and Bitcoin Core) are of the opinion that quantum computers capable of cracking Bitcoin pubkeys are unlikely to appear within a decade or two.
So:
For now, the homomorphic and linear properties of elliptic curve cryptography provide a lot of benefits --- particularly the linearity property is what enables Scriptless Script and simple multisignature (i.e. multisignatures that are just 1 signature onchain). So it might be a good idea to take advantage of them now while we are still fairly safe against quantum computers. It seems likely that quantum-safe signature schemes are nonlinear (thus losing these advantages).

Summary

I Wanna Be The Taprooter!

So, do you want to help activate Taproot? Here's what you, mister sovereign Bitcoin HODLer, can do!

But I Hate Taproot!!

That's fine!

Discussions About Taproot Activation

almkglor your post has been copied because one or more comments in this topic have been removed. This copy will preserve unmoderated topic. If you would like to opt-out, please send a message using [this link].
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submitted by anticensor_bot to u/anticensor_bot [link] [comments]

BCH Unlimited 1.8.0 has just been released

Download the latest Bitcoin Cash compatible release of BCH Unlimited (1.8.0, April 17th, 2020) from:
 
https://www.bitcoinunlimited.info/download
https://github.com/BitcoinUnlimited/BitcoinUnlimited/releases/tag/BCHunlimited1.8.0.0
 
This is a major release of BCH Unlimited compatible with the upcoming protocol upgrade of the Bitcoin Cash network. You could find May 15th, 2020 upgrade specifications here:
This is list of the main changes that have been merged in this release:
 
Release notes:
https://github.com/BitcoinUnlimited/BitcoinUnlimited/blob/dev/doc/release-notes/release-notes-1.8.0.md
 
PS Ubuntu PPA repository is currently being updated to serve for 1.8.0.
edit: there is no support for the proposed IFP tax in this release.
submitted by s1ckpig to btc [link] [comments]

Wasabi says unspent coin is spent?

Sorry if someone's already answered this at some point! Searched the subreddit but didn't see any solutions in the results.
The past two days, my BTC was listed as unconfirmed following a CoinJoin and transfer to second wallet. Followed a recommendation about an hour ago to remove Transactions.dat in BitcoinStore > Main > Mempool and then reboot Wasabi. That did appear to work in getting some of my coin bits to show up confirmed, but now part of it shows up as 'spent' and is apparently still waiting on confirmation?
Should I just keep waiting, or is there any other recommendation that might fix the issue?
submitted by admingumbo to WasabiWallet [link] [comments]

Question about "Not enough funds" message I'm seeing in Electrum

Hi, I apologize if this is a question that comes up often but not sure why I'm getting a "Not enough funds" message in the lower left-hand corner of my Electrum window after I tried to send funds about an hour ago. I have Electrum 3.3.8. I have fees set to the lowest possible amount on this "Fee" scroll indicator in they have in Electrum (says "Target: Within 25 blocks" when I hover over it) and then I clicked "Max" which I figured would give me the maximum amount of bitcoin I could send accounting for the subtraction of a fee. I sent around .120 BTC and the fee was 0.00000494 BTC (2.6 sat/byte) - when I added the amount I wanted to send to the fee it came out to exactly the amount I had in my wallet so I clicked "Send" to send the money as I figured that meant I'd have enough to pay whatever fees. Shortly thereafter, I see a "Not enough funds" message in the lower-left hand corner of my Electrum window. Why am I receiving this message and will this be an issue (I've never seen this message before when trying to send bitcoin)? Sent just an hour or so ago but the funds are still listed as "unconfirmed". I am seeing in my preferences that I have the "Use Replace-By-Fee" option checked. Will I end up having to revise or recall this transaction somehow? Sorry, not much experience with Bitcoin and have never seen this issue before...
submitted by wardnine to Electrum [link] [comments]

BCH Unlimited 1.8.0 has just been released

Download the latest Bitcoin Cash compatible release of BCH Unlimited (1.8.0, April 17th, 2020) from:

 

https://www.bitcoinunlimited.info/download

https://github.com/BitcoinUnlimited/BitcoinUnlimited/releases/tag/BCHunlimited1.8.0.0

 

This is a major release of BCH Unlimited compatible with the upcoming protocol upgrade of the Bitcoin Cash network. You could find May 15th, 2020 upgrade specifications here:

- https://gitlab.com/bitcoin-cash-node/bchn-sw/bitcoincash-upgrade-specifications/-/blob/mastespec/2020-05-15-upgrade.md

This is list of the main changes that have been merged in this release:

- Project rebrand to BCH Unlimited
- Increase length of unconfirmed transaction to 500
- Drastically improve performance of mempool management
- OP_REVERSEBYTES implementation
- SigChecks implementation
- Failure recovery for Graphene
- Graphene improve block construction reliability
- Improve QA tests (both units and functional tests)
- Reduce resource requirement for Parallel Validation
- Fix datadir compatibility problem due to unspecified ABC parking/unparking chain concept
- Clean up and update the seeders list
- Various improvements to deadlock detectors
- Misc improvements to IBD
- Use ctor to improve fetching tx from disc (txindex=1)
- Add a priority queue for urgent message processing
- Documentation update and improvements
- Improve ElectrsCash integration
- Rewrite of the fee estimator

 

Release notes:
https://github.com/BitcoinUnlimited/BitcoinUnlimited/blob/dev/doc/release-notes/release-notes-1.8.0.md

 

PS Ubuntu PPA repository is currently being updated to serve for 1.8.0.
submitted by s1ckpig to Bitcoincash [link] [comments]

BCH Unlimited 1.8.0 has just been released

Download the latest Bitcoin Cash compatible release of BCH Unlimited (1.8.0, April 17th, 2020) from:
 
https://www.bitcoinunlimited.info/download
https://github.com/BitcoinUnlimited/BitcoinUnlimited/releases/tag/BCHunlimited1.8.0.0
 
This is a major release of BCH Unlimited compatible with the upcoming protocol upgrade of the Bitcoin Cash network. You could find May 15th, 2020 upgrade specifications here:
This is list of the main changes that have been merged in this release:
 
Release notes: https://github.com/BitcoinUnlimited/BitcoinUnlimited/blob/dev/doc/release-notes/release-notes-1.8.0.md
 
PS Ubuntu PPA repository is currently being updated to serve for 1.8.0.
submitted by s1ckpig to bitcoin_unlimited [link] [comments]

Groestlcoin 6th Anniversary Release

Introduction

Dear Groestlers, it goes without saying that 2020 has been a difficult time for millions of people worldwide. The groestlcoin team would like to take this opportunity to wish everyone our best to everyone coping with the direct and indirect effects of COVID-19. Let it bring out the best in us all and show that collectively, we can conquer anything.
The centralised banks and our national governments are facing unprecedented times with interest rates worldwide dropping to record lows in places. Rest assured that this can only strengthen the fundamentals of all decentralised cryptocurrencies and the vision that was seeded with Satoshi's Bitcoin whitepaper over 10 years ago. Despite everything that has been thrown at us this year, the show must go on and the team will still progress and advance to continue the momentum that we have developed over the past 6 years.
In addition to this, we'd like to remind you all that this is Groestlcoin's 6th Birthday release! In terms of price there have been some crazy highs and lows over the years (with highs of around $2.60 and lows of $0.000077!), but in terms of value– Groestlcoin just keeps getting more valuable! In these uncertain times, one thing remains clear – Groestlcoin will keep going and keep innovating regardless. On with what has been worked on and completed over the past few months.

UPDATED - Groestlcoin Core 2.18.2

This is a major release of Groestlcoin Core with many protocol level improvements and code optimizations, featuring the technical equivalent of Bitcoin v0.18.2 but with Groestlcoin-specific patches. On a general level, most of what is new is a new 'Groestlcoin-wallet' tool which is now distributed alongside Groestlcoin Core's other executables.
NOTE: The 'Account' API has been removed from this version which was typically used in some tip bots. Please ensure you check the release notes from 2.17.2 for details on replacing this functionality.

How to Upgrade?

Windows
If you are running an older version, shut it down. Wait until it has completely shut down (which might take a few minutes for older versions), then run the installer.
OSX
If you are running an older version, shut it down. Wait until it has completely shut down (which might take a few minutes for older versions), run the dmg and drag Groestlcoin Core to Applications.
Ubuntu
http://groestlcoin.org/forum/index.php?topic=441.0

Other Linux

http://groestlcoin.org/forum/index.php?topic=97.0

Download

Download the Windows Installer (64 bit) here
Download the Windows Installer (32 bit) here
Download the Windows binaries (64 bit) here
Download the Windows binaries (32 bit) here
Download the OSX Installer here
Download the OSX binaries here
Download the Linux binaries (64 bit) here
Download the Linux binaries (32 bit) here
Download the ARM Linux binaries (64 bit) here
Download the ARM Linux binaries (32 bit) here

Source

ALL NEW - Groestlcoin Moonshine iOS/Android Wallet

Built with React Native, Moonshine utilizes Electrum-GRS's JSON-RPC methods to interact with the Groestlcoin network.
GRS Moonshine's intended use is as a hot wallet. Meaning, your keys are only as safe as the device you install this wallet on. As with any hot wallet, please ensure that you keep only a small, responsible amount of Groestlcoin on it at any given time.

Features

Download

iOS
Android

Source

ALL NEW! – HODL GRS Android Wallet

HODL GRS connects directly to the Groestlcoin network using SPV mode and doesn't rely on servers that can be hacked or disabled.
HODL GRS utilizes AES hardware encryption, app sandboxing, and the latest security features to protect users from malware, browser security holes, and even physical theft. Private keys are stored only in the secure enclave of the user's phone, inaccessible to anyone other than the user.
Simplicity and ease-of-use is the core design principle of HODL GRS. A simple recovery phrase (which we call a Backup Recovery Key) is all that is needed to restore the user's wallet if they ever lose or replace their device. HODL GRS is deterministic, which means the user's balance and transaction history can be recovered just from the backup recovery key.

Features

Download

Main Release (Main Net)
Testnet Release

Source

ALL NEW! – GroestlcoinSeed Savior

Groestlcoin Seed Savior is a tool for recovering BIP39 seed phrases.
This tool is meant to help users with recovering a slightly incorrect Groestlcoin mnemonic phrase (AKA backup or seed). You can enter an existing BIP39 mnemonic and get derived addresses in various formats.
To find out if one of the suggested addresses is the right one, you can click on the suggested address to check the address' transaction history on a block explorer.

Features

Live Version (Not Recommended)

https://www.groestlcoin.org/recovery/

Download

https://github.com/Groestlcoin/mnemonic-recovery/archive/master.zip

Source

ALL NEW! – Vanity Search Vanity Address Generator

NOTE: NVidia GPU or any CPU only. AMD graphics cards will not work with this address generator.
VanitySearch is a command-line Segwit-capable vanity Groestlcoin address generator. Add unique flair when you tell people to send Groestlcoin. Alternatively, VanitySearch can be used to generate random addresses offline.
If you're tired of the random, cryptic addresses generated by regular groestlcoin clients, then VanitySearch is the right choice for you to create a more personalized address.
VanitySearch is a groestlcoin address prefix finder. If you want to generate safe private keys, use the -s option to enter your passphrase which will be used for generating a base key as for BIP38 standard (VanitySearch.exe -s "My PassPhrase" FXPref). You can also use VanitySearch.exe -ps "My PassPhrase" which will add a crypto secure seed to your passphrase.
VanitySearch may not compute a good grid size for your GPU, so try different values using -g option in order to get the best performances. If you want to use GPUs and CPUs together, you may have best performances by keeping one CPU core for handling GPU(s)/CPU exchanges (use -t option to set the number of CPU threads).

Features

Usage

https://github.com/Groestlcoin/VanitySearch#usage

Download

Source

ALL NEW! – Groestlcoin EasyVanity 2020

Groestlcoin EasyVanity 2020 is a windows app built from the ground-up and makes it easier than ever before to create your very own bespoke bech32 address(es) when whilst not connected to the internet.
If you're tired of the random, cryptic bech32 addresses generated by regular Groestlcoin clients, then Groestlcoin EasyVanity2020 is the right choice for you to create a more personalised bech32 address. This 2020 version uses the new VanitySearch to generate not only legacy addresses (F prefix) but also Bech32 addresses (grs1 prefix).

Features

Download

Source

Remastered! – Groestlcoin WPF Desktop Wallet (v2.19.0.18)

Groestlcoin WPF is an alternative full node client with optional lightweight 'thin-client' mode based on WPF. Windows Presentation Foundation (WPF) is one of Microsoft's latest approaches to a GUI framework, used with the .NET framework. Its main advantages over the original Groestlcoin client include support for exporting blockchain.dat and including a lite wallet mode.
This wallet was previously deprecated but has been brought back to life with modern standards.

Features

Remastered Improvements

Download

Source

ALL NEW! – BIP39 Key Tool

Groestlcoin BIP39 Key Tool is a GUI interface for generating Groestlcoin public and private keys. It is a standalone tool which can be used offline.

Features

Download

Windows
Linux :
 pip3 install -r requirements.txt python3 bip39\_gui.py 

Source

ALL NEW! – Electrum Personal Server

Groestlcoin Electrum Personal Server aims to make using Electrum Groestlcoin wallet more secure and more private. It makes it easy to connect your Electrum-GRS wallet to your own full node.
It is an implementation of the Electrum-grs server protocol which fulfils the specific need of using the Electrum-grs wallet backed by a full node, but without the heavyweight server backend, for a single user. It allows the user to benefit from all Groestlcoin Core's resource-saving features like pruning, blocks only and disabled txindex. All Electrum-GRS's feature-richness like hardware wallet integration, multi-signature wallets, offline signing, seed recovery phrases, coin control and so on can still be used, but connected only to the user's own full node.
Full node wallets are important in Groestlcoin because they are a big part of what makes the system be trust-less. No longer do people have to trust a financial institution like a bank or PayPal, they can run software on their own computers. If Groestlcoin is digital gold, then a full node wallet is your own personal goldsmith who checks for you that received payments are genuine.
Full node wallets are also important for privacy. Using Electrum-GRS under default configuration requires it to send (hashes of) all your Groestlcoin addresses to some server. That server can then easily spy on your transactions. Full node wallets like Groestlcoin Electrum Personal Server would download the entire blockchain and scan it for the user's own addresses, and therefore don't reveal to anyone else which Groestlcoin addresses they are interested in.
Groestlcoin Electrum Personal Server can also broadcast transactions through Tor which improves privacy by resisting traffic analysis for broadcasted transactions which can link the IP address of the user to the transaction. If enabled this would happen transparently whenever the user simply clicks "Send" on a transaction in Electrum-grs wallet.
Note: Currently Groestlcoin Electrum Personal Server can only accept one connection at a time.

Features

Download

Windows
Linux / OSX (Instructions)

Source

UPDATED – Android Wallet 7.38.1 - Main Net + Test Net

The app allows you to send and receive Groestlcoin on your device using QR codes and URI links.
When using this app, please back up your wallet and email them to yourself! This will save your wallet in a password protected file. Then your coins can be retrieved even if you lose your phone.

Changes

Download

Main Net
Main Net (FDroid)
Test Net

Source

UPDATED – Groestlcoin Sentinel 3.5.06 (Android)

Groestlcoin Sentinel is a great solution for anyone who wants the convenience and utility of a hot wallet for receiving payments directly into their cold storage (or hardware wallets).
Sentinel accepts XPUB's, YPUB'S, ZPUB's and individual Groestlcoin address. Once added you will be able to view balances, view transactions, and (in the case of XPUB's, YPUB's and ZPUB's) deterministically generate addresses for that wallet.
Groestlcoin Sentinel is a fork of Groestlcoin Samourai Wallet with all spending and transaction building code removed.

Changes

Download

Source

UPDATED – P2Pool Test Net

Changes

Download

Pre-Hosted Testnet P2Pool is available via http://testp2pool.groestlcoin.org:21330/static/

Source

submitted by Yokomoko_Saleen to groestlcoin [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Unlimited 1.7.0 has just been released

Download the latest Bitcoin Cash compatible release of Bitcoin Unlimited (1.7.0, October 11th, 2019) from:
 
https://www.bitcoinunlimited.info/download
https://github.com/BitcoinUnlimited/BitcoinUnlimited/releases/tag/bucash1.7.0.0
 
This is a major release of Bitcoin Unlimited compatible with the upcoming protocol upgrade of the Bitcoin Cash network. You could find November 15th, 2019 upgrade specifications here:
This is list of the main changes that have been merged in this release:
 
Release notes: https://github.com/BitcoinUnlimited/BitcoinUnlimited/blob/dev/doc/release-notes/release-notes-bucash1.7.0.md
 
PS Ubuntu PPA repository is currently being updated to serve for 1.7.0
(*) if you were using BU with -txindex, after the fist session after the upgrade the database where the index are stored will be upgraded to a new format. During this migration RPC command will return an error message saying the txindex is syncing. The lasting of the migration process depends on the machine where BU is installed.
submitted by s1ckpig to btc [link] [comments]

“December is going to be amazing for Litecoin and Bitcoin. This is almost insane.”

“December is going to be amazing for Litecoin and Bitcoin. This is almost insane.” submitted by EWFIV to litecoin [link] [comments]

Segwitcoin Mempool Increasing. Over 50,000 Transaction Backlog and Growing. Fees Rising to over $2.50 for a Transaction.

submitted by cryptorebel to btc [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Unlimited 1.7.0 has just been released

Download the latest Bitcoin Cash compatible release of Bitcoin Unlimited (1.7.0, October 11th, 2019) from:
 
https://www.bitcoinunlimited.info/download
https://github.com/BitcoinUnlimited/BitcoinUnlimited/releases/tag/bucash1.7.0.0
 
This is a major release of Bitcoin Unlimited compatible with the upcoming protocol upgrade of the Bitcoin Cash network. You could find November 15th, 2019 upgrade specifications here:
This is list of the main changes that have been merged in this release:
 
Release notes: https://github.com/BitcoinUnlimited/BitcoinUnlimited/blob/dev/doc/release-notes/release-notes-bucash1.7.0.md
 
PS Ubuntu PPA repository is currently being updated to serve for BUcash 1.7.0
submitted by s1ckpig to Bitcoincash [link] [comments]

I have tried (almost) every mobile wallet

I have tested just about every mobile wallet on Google play now. Here is how I test it: I download the app, back it up, load some coin into it and send it back out. What have I missed? Anything you can recommend? Here is why I don't like a single app so far in no particular order : Samurai: No usd conversion No notifications
Blockchain: Lagging VPN or mobile data Very slow to load walances even on wifi
Enjin : Must type pw every time No notifications Slow to show transactions
Mycelium: Ugly No notifications
Bitcoin.com: Promotes bch No notifications
Trust: No notifications Slow updates of balance
Lumi: Insanely slow loading No notifications
Exodus: Failed me big time (would not send txs at all had to reinstall) Fixed fees (they are reasonable though)
Guarda: Gives you aids using it Can't spend unconfirmed funds Gave me 3 of each wallet and trippled my balance (nope couldn't spend it) Does not let you sort coins No notifications Slow as hell Ass in general
Bitcoin wallet (from btc devs): No notifications No 12 word phrase back up
Bitpay: Slow to load Shady business practices No notifications
Atomic wallet Astronomically high fixed fees Slow to load Long unsortable list of coins
Edge: Slow No notifications
Greenaddress: Qr scanner opens randomly Buggy as hell No notifications
Coinomi: Must type a 10 digit pw every time you send No notifications
submitted by starkiller3373 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Day 2: I will repost this guide daily until available solutions like Segwit & order batching are adopted, the mempool is empty once again, and transaction fees are low. You can help. Take action today

Subhan Nadeem has pointed out that:
If every transaction in the Bitcoin network was a SegWit transaction today, blocks would contain up to 8,000 transactions, and the 138,000 unconfirmed transaction backlog would disappear instantly. Transaction fees would be almost non-existent once again.
A few thousand bitcoin users from /Bitcoin switching to making their next transactions Segwit transactions will help take pressure off the network now, and together we can encourage exchanges/wallets to rapidly deploy Segwit for everyone ASAP. Let's make it happen.
Exchanges: Find out if your exchange has deployed Segwit already. If not, politely request that they do so within 30-days or they will lose your business. Sign-up for an account with a Segwit deployed/ready exchange now
Full list: https://bitcoincore.org/en/segwit_adoption/
Wallets: Make sure you have a Segwit capable wallet installed and ready to use for your next bitcoin transaction
Hardware Wallets:
Desktop Wallets
iOS Wallets:
Android Wallets
FAQs
If I'm a HODLer, will it help to send my BTC to a Segwit address now?
  • No, just get ready now so that your NEXT transaction will be to a Segwit wallet.
Can you please tell me how to move my bitcoins to segwit address in Bitcoin core wallet? Does the sender or receiver matter?
  • The Bitcoin core wallet does not yet have a GUI for its Segwit functionality. Download Electrum v3.0.3 to generate a Segwit address.
    via HowToToken.com:
    A transaction between two SegWit addresses is a SegWit transaction.
    A transaction sent from a SegWit address to a non-SegWit address is a SegWit transaction.
    A transaction sent from a non-SegWit address to a SegWit address is NOT a SegWit transaction. You can send a Segwit Tx if the sending address is a Segwit address.
Is there a hardware wallet that does segwit addresses?
  • Yes, Trezor supports Segwit by default. Ledger Nano also has support.
What wallet are you using to "batch your sends"? And how can I do that?
  • Using Electrum, the "Tools" menu option: "Pay to many".
    Just enter your receive addresses and the amounts for each, and you can send multiple transactions for nearly the price of one.
Segwit blog guides
Previous Day's Threads
Edit: added FAQ's to the list, corrections, BitWallet
submitted by Bastiat to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Best Bitcoin Wallet hands down

I'd like to get some feedback on what YOU think is the best bitcoin wallet out there? Your personal favorite and why. BTW, I use Multibit, any opinions on it? The good, bad, the ugly?
submitted by tikaboo_peak to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Do Bitcoin transactions ever expire?

Transaction expiration is a common myth/misconception. Once a Bitcoin transaction is created, it never automatically expires. In theory, a transaction could be created, get stuck at 0 confirmations for some years, and then all of a sudden confirm.
Several wallets have the behavior of deleting outgoing transactions from their transaction list after a few days of being unconfirmed. This is insane, and could lead to losses. Consider the following example
  1. You send a transaction. It gets stuck due to having a too-low fee.
  2. Your wallet deletes the transaction after a number of days.
  3. You still want to send the transaction, so you create a new transaction with the same value but a higher fee. This confirms.
  4. The recipient uses child-pays-for-parent (CPFP) to get the first transaction to also confirm. You have now paid twice, losing BTC, even though the first transaction "expired".
It is possible to create two transactions that are mutually exclusive. For example, the proper way of increasing the fee in the above example would be to send another transaction that uses exactly the same coins as the first transaction. Since a single coin can't be spent more than once, only one of the transactions will ever confirm. Actual losses due to the insane expiration behavior of certain wallets are rare because wallets often accidentally use the same coins when recreating an "expired" transaction, but it is very reckless to rely on this.
This myth may have been started by Bitcoin Core's default behavior of removing transactions from its memory pool after 72 hours (later changed to 2 weeks). Due to this behavior, it became likely in most cases that a transaction would never confirm after it went 72 hours unconfirmed. However, just because most nodes will forget about a transaction doesn't mean that everyone must or will do so. You have to plan for the worst case, not the typical case.
submitted by alifkhalil469 to BtcNewz [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Unlimited 1.7.0 has just been released

Download the latest Bitcoin Cash compatible release of Bitcoin Unlimited (1.7.0, October 11th, 2019) from:
 
https://www.bitcoinunlimited.info/download
https://github.com/BitcoinUnlimited/BitcoinUnlimited/releases/tag/bucash1.7.0.0
 
This is a major release of Bitcoin Unlimited compatible with the upcoming protocol upgrade of the Bitcoin Cash network. You could find November 15th, 2019 upgrade specifications here:
This is list of the main changes that have been merged in this release:
 
Release notes: https://github.com/BitcoinUnlimited/BitcoinUnlimited/blob/dev/doc/release-notes/release-notes-bucash1.7.0.md
 
PS Ubuntu PPA repository is currently being updated to serve for 1.7.0
submitted by s1ckpig to bitcoin_unlimited [link] [comments]

Introducing SLP SDK v1!

SLP SDK V1.0.0 is live!
SLP SDK is a fully featured javascript framework powered by BITBOX. Everything you need to easily issue, spend or trade your own token.
Simple Ledger Protocol is simple, robust and extensible. All transactions are 100% on the blockchain for full auditability by any party. The first and currently only BCH token system to support light wallets. You can use multi signature addresses and other Bitcoin script features with SLP tokens.
SLP SDK is a superset of BITBOX SDK so you get 100% of the BITBOX functionality you're used to out of the box.
v1 includes
List tokens * List all tokens * List single token by token id
List Balances
* List all token balances for an address * List single balance for address by token id
Address * SLP addr Conversion * Cash addr Conversion * legacy addr Conversion * isLegacyAddress * isCashAddress * isSLPAddress * isMainnetAddress * isTestnetAddress * isP2PKHAddress * isP2SHAddress * detectAddressFormat * detectAddressNetwork * detectAddressType * details * utxo * unconfirmed * transactions
Create token * Create new token * Pass minting baton * Mint more tokens * Send tokens
Over 550 passing tests. Full documentation: https://developer.bitcoin.com/slp
TOKENIZE ALL THE THINGS
submitted by cgcardona to btc [link] [comments]

Blockchain Unconfirmed Transaction Script NEW UPDATE 100% WORKING 2020 Blockchain Unconfirmed transaction Hack,100% working Script 2020 New Blockchain unconfirmed transaction hack script 100% working updated june 2020 Bitcoin unconfirmed Transaction HACK  New Bitcoin Doubler site paying Unconfirmed Bitcoin Transaction Hack FREE 2020

What Does an Unconfirmed Bitcoin Transaction Mean? An unconfirmed transaction is one that hasn’t yet been picked up by a miner and processed into a block. There are a number of reasons your transaction may be unconfirmed. The network is congested and all transactions are taking longer than normal to be processed. Each transaction takes the The most popular and trusted block explorer and crypto transaction search engine. [ July 6, 2020 ] Bitcoin Rises in Line With Stocks After Dip Below $9K Crypto News Search for: Home Basics Of Bitcoin New Script 🔥 DSA.exe 2020 🔥 BlockChain TX Unconfirmed Transaction Hack Withdraw Proof LEGIT New Script 🔥 DSA.exe 2020 🔥 BlockChain TX Unconfirmed Transaction Hack Withdraw Proof LEGIT An unconfirmed transaction means that the transaction has not yet been included in a block and is thus uncompleted. Common reasons for unconfirmed transactions are: You have just made the transfer. The Bitcoin network needs at least 10 minutes, on average, to include the transaction in a block; The blockchain fee is too low or absent. 1. Choose any unconfirmed transaction. 2. Copy the Code of Script . 3. Right click on the mouse and Choose “inspect” (Ctrl+Shift+I). 4. Go in “Console” tab and paste the Script and press ENTER. 5. Copy your bitcoin address and paste on alert box to change the receiver address and press ENTER. 6. Wait a few seconds to complete the

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